Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Recipes

Moroccan-Inspired Grilled Quail with Sauteed Kale and Grilled Lemons

If you’re someone who has wondered if cooking a bird as small as a quail is worth the time and effort, let us remind you that good things do indeed come in small packages. As far as time and effort goes, it requires very little of either to serve quail. Its small size means that it takes just a sprinkle of seasoning or a brief amount of time in a marinade to add tons of extra flavor. Not that you need to; even with just a dash of salt, quail meat is tender and succulent. And quail cooks very quickly – 10 minutes or so on the grill and dinner is ready.

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Curry Spiced Kangaroo Loin with Savory Coconut Cauliflower

There might be some of you out there who can’t imagine eating a kangaroo because of something called the “cute factor.” It’s true that most advertisements promoting tourism Down Under feature kangaroos so cuddly-looking that the last thing on your mind is throwing one on the barbie. Most people just want to catch a glimpse of a kangaroo hopping around in its natural habitat. The odds of this are pretty good; kangaroos are year-round, prolific breeders. In fact, there are so many kangaroos hopping around in Australia that commercial harvesting of the species is necessary to keep the ecosystem in balance. Given these circumstances it makes sense to eat the meat rather than letting it go to waste – luckily, it’s tastier than you might imagine.

Rich and slightly sweet with only a hint of gaminess, high in protein, zinc and iron and always free range (there is no farming of kangaroos in Australia) kangaroo meat is becoming more and more popular within Australia and beyond. Although eating kangaroo may be new to many people, it is nothing out of the ordinary for Australia’s Indigenous peoples, who have hunted kangaroos for thousands of years.

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Pan-Seared Venison Chops in a Spiced Marinade

Some people don’t like to eat game because it’s too, well, gamey. Others prize wild meat for exactly this quality. Lack of gaminess, one might argue, is lack of any real flavor in meat. When we bought venison this week, we found tons of recipes that claimed to mask the gamey flavor, but this seemed to defeat the whole purpose of eating venison. Isn’t trying to take the gaminess out of venison like trying to take the beefiness out of beef?

Meat from grass-fed animals has more flavor than meat from animals fed only grain, so it just makes sense that meat from animals feasting in the wild on everything from ragweed to wild clover to dandelions has the most flavor of all. In venison, this flavor comes across as slightly sweet and very rich, with a bit of a grassy, herbal quality to it. Truly wild venison has a stronger, more nuanced flavor than most venison sold in butcher shops, since much of the venison on the market is farm or ranch raised. “Venison” can be meat from deer, elk, moose, caribou or antelope, but most typically refers to deer. The name of the specific animal must be specified on the package label when the meat is sold. According to the USDA, farm raised deer live in a somewhat confined outdoor area and can be fed grains such as wheat, alfalfa, or corn. Ranch raised deer are allowed to roam over hundreds of acres and forage in a fairly natural setting. Some ranch-raised deer are also harvested in the field, rather than rounded up and butchered in a processing plant. Short of hunting your own deer meat, ranch-raised game is the next best option.

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Grilled Ostrich Smothered in Garlic Herb Butter

Ostriches are a true oddity. First, there’s the whole 8-foot tall thing, the freakishly long neck and the large wings that have no flight capabilities whatsoever. Then there’s the fact that the meat does not remotely resemble meat from more commonly eaten birds like chicken, turkey or quail. In fact ostrich meat is similar to beef. Like beef, ostrich is sold in cuts such as filets, medallions, roasts and burgers. Unlike beef, ostrich meat is not rippled with fat. While some people think the low fat content of ostrich is its biggest selling point, we see this as a slight downside. We’re willing to overlook this minor quibble because we like the mild, meaty flavor. And we take things into our own hands anyway and add a little fat back into the equation by serving ostrich with a favorite savory topping: garlic herb butter.

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Double-Pork Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Vegetables certainly have their place at the Primal table and we eat them often in every season. But man (and woman) cannot survive on vegetables alone. Or, rather, they can and do, but in our opinion it’s a much less tasty (and nutritious) way to live. Nothing lures us in and satisfies our hunger like the savory aroma of meat dripping with juices and glistening with lip-smacking fat.

In our never-ending quest to enjoy all the butcher shop has to offer, we’re turning our attention this week to a cut of meat we rarely buy. Not because it’s exotic or adventurous, quite the opposite actually. In fact, it might just be the least adventurous cut of meat out there. That’s right, we’re talking about the boneless, skinless chicken breast.

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Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes with Chives

Now here’s a vegetable that doesn’t have it easy. The Jerusalem artichoke is neither an artichoke nor is it from Jerusalem. It’s no beauty either; the knobby, brown exterior doesn’t exactly whet the appetite. Perhaps worst of all, however, is its reputation for causing a bit of, well, there’s really no delicate way to say this… gas.

So why do Jerusalem Artichokes have a devoted foodie fan base? A unique but delicate flavor, for starters. Secondly, it’s a vegetable that’s really easy to cook in a variety of ways. Last but definitely not least, we appreciate this low-starch tuber for its prebiotic fiber and think that in moderation it can add healthy variety to your diet.

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