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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Recipes

Korean Tacos

Korean tacos are a culinary twist that’s been around for a while now, using a tortilla as the delivery system for the bold flavors of Korean cuisine. This Primal recipe for Korean tacos is intensely delicious and hits all the right notes: sweet, spicy, fresh, crunchy, meaty.

Let’s start with the ribs. They’re simmered in a sweet umami sauce made from tenderizing fruit (kiwi and pear) plus ginger, garlic, scallions, and coconut aminos. The meat is scooped onto a small tortilla and topped with refreshing daikon radish and carrot slaw. It only takes a few bites to devour these Korean tacos, and you’ll definitely want more than one, so put several on your plate.

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Cassava Flour Crepes

These are the real deal—crepes that are almost identical to regular crepes, with one simple difference: they’re made from gluten-free cassava flour. Stuff these buttery crepes with either sweet or savory fillings, and they’re a delicious treat for breakfast or brunch.

The great thing about cassava flour is that it’s a whole food that can be used to make gluten-free, grain-free, nut-free baked goods. Although cassava flour isn’t a perfect replacement for all-purpose flour, it’s pretty darn close. It’s fun to experiment in the kitchen with cassava flour, but also expensive. A 2-pound bag can set you back around $20.

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White Chicken Chili

White chili is called white chili for three reasons. One, it’s made with chicken, not beef. Two, it’s made with white beans. Three, it’s sometimes thickened with milk and flour, or cream.

Does white chili have a place at the Primal table? Absolutely. It’s easy to dispense with the milk and flour, since thickening the chili isn’t crucial to its flavor. What about the beans?  You can keep them in the chili if you like (although perhaps in smaller amounts than most recipes call for). Or, substitute cubes of celery root to provide a creamy but slightly firm texture that’s similar to beans. Like beans, celery root also has a neutral, but earthy flavor.

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Shrimp with Kimchi Mayo

Here we have the rare Primal recipe that tells you to forgo homemade and instead use three store-bought condiments: Korean gochujang, kimchi, and PRIMAL KITCHEN™ Mayo. With this trio of ingredients, you can whip up a wildly flavorful shrimp appetizer. Plus, you’ll get some beneficial probiotic bacteria with every bite.

To make this addictive recipe, you’ll marinate shrimp in Korean gochujang, a fermented chili paste with a spicy and slightly sweet flavor. On the side, finely chopped kimchi is blended with Primal Mayo to make a full-flavored, pungent and creamy sauce for dipping. Quick, easy and delicious!

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Buffalo Ranch Chicken Stuffed Jalapeños with Bacon

Today’s guest recipe was written by George Bryant, author of The Paleo Kitchen and founder of Civilized Caveman. 

I’m elated to share this recipe with you, but first let me introduce myself. I’m George Bryant, a.k.a. Civilized Caveman, and you can check me out at my home base, Civilized Caveman Cooking. My passion is helping people to achieve their goals and dreams and to live a life they love. I do this in our Hugs & Bacon Tribe, teaching people weight loss, fat loss, movement, mindset, and so much more.

But enough chit chat… Let’s talk about ranch dressing. Looking at this recipe, you might think it’s about the peppers or filling. It’s not! This recipe was created for one reason and one reason only: so I would have an excuse to eat more of this ranch dressing.

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Tapioca Crepes

Tapioca crepes are a popular food in Brazil that just happens to also be Primal and paleo friendly. Made from tapioca flour, these crepes are naturally gluten-free. They have a completely neutral flavor that works with both sweet and savory fillings. Often eaten for breakfast or for a snack, the crepes can be filled with scrambled eggs, shredded meat, avocado and lox, roasted vegetables and pesto, fresh berries, or melted dark chocolate.

Basically, tapioca crepes are an edible container for just about anything.
These crepes are thin and light with a chewy texture and crispy edges. The technique for making the crepes can take a little practice to perfect, but it’s very straightforward: moistened tapioca flour is sifted into a dry, hot pan and in less than a minute, the flour melds together into a crepe. Spreading salted butter onto the crepe as soon as it comes out of the pan adds more flavor, for both sweet and savory fillings.

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