Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Recipes

Primal Furikake

Furikake is a Japanese seasoning made from dried fish (bonito), sesame seeds, dried seaweed, salt, sugar, and often msg. A Primal version is easy to make–simply drop the sugar and msg–and you have a versatile seasoning for just about everything.

The ratio of ingredients can be tailored to your own taste, so simply use this furikake recipe as a guide. This particular recipe adds plenty of nori, since you can’t go wrong with a lot of nori.

Lightly toasted sesame seeds add crunch and the bonito flakes add an irreplaceable salty, umami flavor. Most grocery stores these days sell bonito flakes, or it can be ordered online. Bonito is air-dried, aged, and shaved tuna.

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Duck Carnitas Tacos

Mexican carnitas are made from meat that’s been slow-cooked in fat. Usually, this means pork braised in lard. But duck legs covered in a thick layer of fatty skin are ideal for this sort of cooking. Not only do you end up with easy, really delicious duck carnitas, you’ll have a little extra rendered duck fat in the pot to use for future cooking.

The tender, shredded duck meat is fried briefly to crisp up the edges, then it’s tossed with a cabbage slaw made from red cabbage, radishes, jalapeno peppers and cilantro. This combination of ingredients makes the slaw a brightly colored, sulfur rich, Vitamin C packed powerhouse…but you don’t have to think about that while you’re eating it. Just focus on how delicious the cool, crunchy, spicy slaw tastes with rich, crispy morsels of duck.

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Cashew Turmeric Chicken Salad (Plus a Contest)

Cashew cream is a vegan obsession that can certainly have a place in a Primal kitchen. To make cashew cream, simply blend cashew nuts with water. A little bit of water makes thick, spreadable cream—and a lot of water turns cashew cream into cashew milk. Either way, the texture is smooth and creamy while the flavor is mild and slightly sweet.

The natural sweetness makes cashew cream an instant dessert. Try a spoonful right out of the blender—it’s like nutty whipped cream. It’s good. A little too good. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

Surprisingly, though, all it takes is a little salt, acidity, and spices to take cashew cream in a completely different direction. With those slight modifications, you’ll have yourself a savory dressing. Cashew cream is an obvious replacement for dairy, or, in this recipe, a stand-in for mayonnaise. Believe it or not, this mayonnaise-free chicken salad can easily compete against traditional chicken salad with mayo. The creamy, slightly tangy dressing coats the chicken nicely, and some celery and shallot add a little crunch.

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Artichoke Deviled Eggs with Capers

Today’s guest post is an original recipe from my eldest, Devyn Sisson! Devyn is hard at work writing her first cookbook, Kitchen Intuition. In the meantime, check her out on Instagram for more recipes and kitchen tips.

I’m Devyn, aka, The Intuitive Chef, aka, Ms. Kitchen Intuition. Whatever alias I go by, “Dev” is always a good fallback. I just received my Masters in Spiritual Psychology, started writing a cookbook called Kitchen Intuition, and recently completed an integrative nutrition program.

Although I’ve learned from cookbooks, the trusty Food Network, and amazing chefs along my journey, I’ve always trusted my intuition when it comes to cooking, paying close attention to my body and taste buds to create strange, delicious, new, exciting recipes that I get to test out on my brave friends and family. And I’d like to share one of those intuitive variations with you today.

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Oyster Po’ Boy Salad

An oyster po’ boy is a classic New Orleans sandwich made of oysters breaded in cornmeal and fried until crisp. Set on a white roll, slathered in mayo and topped with iceberg lettuce and tomatoes, it isn’t exactly health food. But if you ditch the white bread and cornmeal, the oyster po’ boy can be reincarnated as a salad that’s really good in its own right.

Fried oysters, it turns out, are a delicious salad topper. In this Primal version of an oyster po’ boy, the oysters are breaded in tapioca flour. Crunchy on the outside and juicy in the middle, they’re perfect tossed with cool iceberg lettuce, fresh tomatoes and a creamy, tangy dressing.

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Lasagna Meatloaf

Lasagna meatloaf has all the delicious flavor of lasagna, without the noodles. Cheese is optional, and although it adds creamy mozzarella flavor, the meatloaf is more than satisfying without it. Marinara sauce, basil and oregano, onion and garlic…this all-beef meatloaf has it all. Plus three ingredients that hold the loaf together perfectly: eggs, finely chopped mushrooms, and gelatin.

Eggs are always used to bind meatloaf. This recipe only uses two. Raw mushrooms, very finely chopped (use a food processor) look a lot like breadcrumbs and in this loaf, have a similar job. They help the meat bind together, while also adding flavor and moisture. Powdered gelatin is the final binding agent, helping to give the meatloaf a sliceable texture. This trio—eggs, mushrooms, and gelatin—can be used with any meatloaf recipe.

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