Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Seafood

Fish Pie

Fish Pie is a classic English dish, probably one of those originally invented to use up fish that was less than fresh. Slathered in mashed potatoes, cheese, and a creamy white sauce, the idea was to cover up the fish, not make it the main focus.

This recipe for Primal fish pie takes a completely different approach. The dish is still covered in a buttery mashed potato crust, but underneath is a light and flavorful filling. Fresh salmon and cod are layered with leeks, zucchini and fresh herbs, and flavored with lemon and Dijon.

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Salmon with Pistachio Pesto

This dairy-free pesto is heavy on pistachio nuts and light on basil. Spiked with garlic and lemon zest and blended together with olive oil, this is a thick, rich sauce that’s more than a little addictive. It’s tempting to eat this pistachio pesto with a spoon, but it’s even better slathered over fatty, pan-seared salmon.

This recipe couldn’t be easier, and it magically transforms a simple salmon dinner into something extra special. Make this, and you’ll feel like a talented chef instead of a home cook who’s stuck in a rut of salmon dinners that are just ho-hum.

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Sardine Nicoise Salad

Salade nicoise might just be the original “Big Ass Salad”. A French classic, Salade nicoise is a rainbow of ingredients arranged on top of lettuce: green beans, purple potatoes, hardboiled eggs, tomatoes, olives, fresh herbs and, usually, tuna. This recipe follows the French preparation pretty closely—with once exception. Instead of opening a can of tuna, try sardines instead.

Although there’s nothing wrong with using tuna for this salad, it’s a good idea to balance your protein intake from different sources. What do sardines have to offer? Sardines are largely free of the heavy metals other, larger fish tend to accumulate (like tuna). They provide ample calcium, iron, protein, selenium, magnesium and omega-3s.

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Smoked Salmon and Avocado Caesar Salad

PRIMAL KITCHEN® Caesar Dressing is everything you want in Caesar salad dressing—creamy and garlicky with a punch of lemon and pepper. It’s the perfect dressing for a simple bowl of crisp romaine lettuce, but if you want to take your Caesar salad to the next level, you’ll toss in more flavor and nutrients with smoked salmon, avocado, and kale.

This salad can be plated at home like a regular salad, or cleverly brought to work in a glass jar. Layering the dressing and ingredients in a jar stores everything neatly (no salad dressing leaks!) and keeps the salad crisp and fresh. When it’s lunchtime, just shake the salad into a bowl. The dressing will pour out on top of the greens, avocado and salmon, instantly making a Caesar salad your coworkers will envy.

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Pad Thai Salad

Pad Thai is a favorite take-out dish for many, but when it arrives tasting too sweet, oily, and starchy it’s not worth the splurge. When ordering Pad Thai, you can ask restaurants to hold the peanuts, but you’ll have less luck asking them to leave out sugar, vegetable oil, or rice noodles. Especially rice noodles, since they make up most of the dish.

Although rice noodles aren’t the worst noodles out there, it’s possible to enjoy the sweet, funky flavor of Pad Thai without them. Made without noodles, refined oil, or too much sugar, this Pad Thai salad is a winner. Crunchy purple cabbage and bean sprouts are tossed with egg and shrimp and a bold dressing inspired by the flavors of traditional Pad Thai.
Still craving those noodles? Then go ahead and toss rice noodles into the salad, too.

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Coconut Milk Oyster Stew

Oysters are most often served raw, or smoked in a can, so it’s easy to forget about good ‘ol oyster stew. Not exactly chowder or bisque, oyster stew is an uncomplicated meal. It’s little more than oysters and milk (or cream) warmed in a pot. It’s perfect in its simplicity.

So why mess with perfection? Milk, that’s why. It’s not for everyone. If you’re one of those people, then you’ll be happy to know that oysters and coconut milk is not such a bad combination. In fact, it’s delicious.

This coconut milk oyster stew is briny, savory, buttery and slightly sweet from the coconut milk. Fresh chives and chunks of melting butter (or ghee) finish the dish, elevating it from good to amazing.

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