Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Seafood

Pad Thai Salad

Pad Thai is a favorite take-out dish for many, but when it arrives tasting too sweet, oily, and starchy it’s not worth the splurge. When ordering Pad Thai, you can ask restaurants to hold the peanuts, but you’ll have less luck asking them to leave out sugar, vegetable oil, or rice noodles. Especially rice noodles, since they make up most of the dish.

Although rice noodles aren’t the worst noodles out there, it’s possible to enjoy the sweet, funky flavor of Pad Thai without them. Made without noodles, refined oil, or too much sugar, this Pad Thai salad is a winner. Crunchy purple cabbage and bean sprouts are tossed with egg and shrimp and a bold dressing inspired by the flavors of traditional Pad Thai.
Still craving those noodles? Then go ahead and toss rice noodles into the salad, too.

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Coconut Milk Oyster Stew

Oysters are most often served raw, or smoked in a can, so it’s easy to forget about good ‘ol oyster stew. Not exactly chowder or bisque, oyster stew is an uncomplicated meal. It’s little more than oysters and milk (or cream) warmed in a pot. It’s perfect in its simplicity.

So why mess with perfection? Milk, that’s why. It’s not for everyone. If you’re one of those people, then you’ll be happy to know that oysters and coconut milk is not such a bad combination. In fact, it’s delicious.

This coconut milk oyster stew is briny, savory, buttery and slightly sweet from the coconut milk. Fresh chives and chunks of melting butter (or ghee) finish the dish, elevating it from good to amazing.

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Shrimp with Kimchi Mayo

Here we have the rare Primal recipe that tells you to forgo homemade and instead use three store-bought condiments: Korean gochujang, kimchi, and PRIMAL KITCHEN™ Mayo. With this trio of ingredients, you can whip up a wildly flavorful shrimp appetizer. Plus, you’ll get some beneficial probiotic bacteria with every bite.

To make this addictive recipe, you’ll marinate shrimp in Korean gochujang, a fermented chili paste with a spicy and slightly sweet flavor. On the side, finely chopped kimchi is blended with Primal Mayo to make a full-flavored, pungent and creamy sauce for dipping. Quick, easy and delicious!

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Cajun Salmon Burgers

A blend of Cajun spices coat these salmon burgers, adding gentle heat to the flavorful, crispy blackened crust. These are pure salmon—no eggs, breadcrumbs or other fillers are needed to hold the juicy burgers together.

When looking for a new way to prepare salmon, don’t forget about burgers. Salmon burgers don’t take much longer to make than a salmon fillet, especially since the cooking time for burgers is only about 5 minutes. Served over salad greens with your favorite dressing, or a dollop of mayonnaise on the side, salmon burgers are a tasty way to get your omega-3s.

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Zucchini Crepes

Is it a crepe? A wrap? A tortilla? You can call them anything you want and wrap them around whatever you’d like. The result is always the same: delicious.

Zucchini and thyme flavor these light but durable wrappers that can hold an array of savory fillings. In this version, a combination of fluffy scrambled eggs, lox, and chives make a winning breakfast crepe.

Other tasty fillings include sautéed mushrooms, grilled shrimp, bacon, and ground meat. Or, skip the fillings and stack up a few zucchini crepes on your plate, top with crème fraiche, and think of them as savory pancakes.

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Fish Head Broth

Fish broth isn’t as versatile as chicken or beef broth, but it’s a special thing, nevertheless. It’s delicate and savory with the appetizing flavor of seafood.

Is this the type of broth you’ll sip straight from a mug? There’s no reason not to if you like fish. Plus, you’ll get a healthy dose of omega-3s, fat-soluble vitamins, selenium, iodine, and other minerals. Enough gelatin can be extracted from a few pounds of fish parts to give your broth a gelatin-rich texture that turns to jelly when refrigerated. The most important fish part to use is the head. In fact, you can make broth entirely from fish heads, although the spine and other bones can be added as well.

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