Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

Tell Me More
Stay Connected
August 11, 2012

Primal Chilaquiles

By Worker Bee
33 Comments

Chilaquiles are a traditional breakfast made from last night’s feast. Leftover salsa and stale tortillas are heated up with a few eggs and any other leftovers you want to throw in the pan. Basically, it’s a scramble but one with spicy, fresh, lively flavor.

Luckily, stale tortillas don’t make or break the dish. Chilaquiles are plenty delicious with just eggs, homemade salsa, jalapenos and cilantro. If you like, slice up some homemade Primal tortillas and serve them on the side. You can also add meat, sour cream, cheese, green onions, avocado and any other ingredients you might usually put in a taco or burrito. Those who love traditional chilaquiles, however, will skip all that and just stick with a big plate of soft scrambled eggs drowning in sauce.

The sauce for chilaquiles can be green salsa or red. In this recipe, it’s red: a quick and easy homemade salsa that has the robust flavor of roasted tomatoes and garlic. The salsa is mild; it’s the sliced and sautéed jalapenos that kick up the spiciness of this dish. Add as many as you can handle. Then scramble up some eggs, mix it all together and you’ll have a breakfast you won’t soon forget.

Servings: 2-4

Ingredients:

  • 2 large or 4 smaller tomatoes
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 2 heaping tablespoons (30mL) finely chopped yellow onion
  • A few tablespoons of oil
  • 1 jalapeno (or more) sliced into rounds
  • 4 eggs, whisked with a little salt
  • Handful of cilantro, roughly chopped

Instructions:

Place the tomatoes on a rimmed baking sheet several inches under an oven broiler on high. Roast the tomatoes for about 5 minutes on each side until the skin blackens and peels back. Let the tomatoes cool to the touch then peel the skin off, discarding both the skin and any juice that gathers.

While the tomatoes cook, toast the garlic clove (peel still on) by putting it in a hot, dry skillet over medium heat until it’s blackened on both sides. Pressing down on the clove to flatten it a little bit will help the skin blacken faster.

Peel the toasted garlic clove and put it in a food processor or blender with the onion, pulsing a few times to chop as much as possible. Add the tomatoes and pulse until you reach your desired salsa texture. Add salt to taste. (If you want a spicy salsa, add some hot sauce, serrano chiles or jalapeno).

Drizzle a tablespoon or so of oil in a pan and heat. Add the jalapenos. Saute a few minutes until lightly browned. Add the eggs and stir as they cook. Just before the eggs are set, add the salsa and cook until heated.

Transfer eggs and salsa to a plate and top with cilantro. Serve slices of Primal tortillas on the side.


dcab_640x80
honey_640x80
fuel_640x80
mayo_640x80
clmayo_640x80
greek_640x80
evao_640x80

Subscribe to the Newsletter

If you'd like to add an avatar to all of your comments click here!

Leave a Reply

33 Comments on "Primal Chilaquiles"

avatar

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Marissa
4 years 1 month ago

couldn’t wait to see what the primal tortillas were. great idea! must try this!

yoolieboolie
yoolieboolie
4 years 1 month ago

Chilaquiles have been on my “most wanted comfort food” list for a while, but I never thought I’d get the chamce, being scared off by the corn tortillas. (a year ago anything made with masa was on my “favorite” list. Now one bite and I have to take tylenol just so I can sleep.)

This is a dream come true! And just as I am ramping up to salsa canning season, woohoo!

Max Ungar
4 years 1 month ago

yoolieboolie, Not sure what kind of training you are doing, but I believe I heard Robb Wolf say something about how he eats corn tortillas sometimes because he finds that his tolderance is actually okay. I think you can actually use corn tortillas as some sort of a post workout meal or something like that. Might be interesting for you to look into if your really into them

Mary
Mary
4 years 1 month ago

I love, love your recipes & gorgeous photos. Can’t wait to try this one & to test the tortillas. I’m finding coconut flour very dry when trying to use it as a flour substitute. With that said, it is very filling (a good thing) and from what I’ve read, very healthful, so I’ll keep experimenting. But as you mentioned, this dish would be fine without the “tortillas” – will be making for breakfast tomorrow.

Theresa in Mérida
4 years 1 month ago

I am totally excited by the primal tortilla recipe and the chilaquiles! I have an annual Christmas day open house and chilaquiles with salsa verde have always been on the menu. I was wondering what I would make to replace them this year! Now I don’t need to wonder anymore. I was toying with just making them anyway since the nixtamalization process makes corn tortillas decreases the carbs. Yeah, I realize that I am justifying.
Now if you could just come up with a Primal version of sopes!
regards,
Theresa

Brian Carr
4 years 1 month ago

Can’t wait to try this out. I’ve been looking for Paleo mexican/southwestern type recipes so this looks like it’s really going to hit the spot!

Max Ungar
4 years 1 month ago

Great looking recipe. I don’t know why, but sometimes I feel like mexican food is under used too many times in the paleo/primal world. Mexican food has some really great ingredients and flavors in it. I love making taco meat with some guac or something like that as an entree. Hopefully I will get a chance to give this one a try.

Paleo Bon Rurgundy
4 years 1 month ago

cacoa!

Ricardo Lopez
Ricardo Lopez
4 years 1 month ago

I’m gonna have to disagree, with the whole “tortillas don’t make or break the dish.” I’ve actually never seen chilaquiles made with eggs, and if you take out the tortillas and just have eggs and salsa its called huevos rancheros.

Love the site, and love recipes but chilaquiles is one of my favorite dishes and there is no replacement for my mom’s chilaquiles my heart 😛

RenegadeRN
RenegadeRN
4 years 1 month ago

Afraid I have to agree Ricardo.
I eat eggs scrambled with salsa and sometimes bacon or sausage and veggies a lot. NOT chilaquiles to me!

South Texans are a bit picky about such things…

I sometimes forget Mexican food is not universally eaten. Breakfast tacos are the hardest for me. INEED a tortilla or some refried pinto beans now and then.

Catalina
Catalina
4 years 1 month ago

Agreed. But these do look yummy in their own right.

WildGrok
WildGrok
4 years 1 month ago

Huevos rancheros … yummy … that is a staple in WildGrok’s cave …
I confess to using canned tomato sauce, now I am inspired to use the home made sauce

WarreNacho
WarreNacho
4 years 1 month ago

I have eaten chilaquiles both in the U.S. and Mexico made all different ways. I’ve found that the only constant thing with Mexican food is that it’s regional and almost no cook makes things exactly the same as another.

My dad is from central Mexico and makes his chilaquiles casserole-style with beaten eggs, cheese, onions, and mushrooms mixed in. I am inspired to re-create Dad’s recipe – with a primal twist, of course!

TB
TB
4 years 1 month ago

Chilaquiles are awesome substituting good pork rinds for the tortillas; maybe not authentic, but delicious, nonetheless.

WarreNacho
WarreNacho
4 years 1 month ago

Chicharrones en salsa AKA chicharrones guisados. Delicious AND traditional. Yum!

Jenell
Jenell
3 years 7 months ago

Pork rinds! I am SO trying this tonight! Thanks!

trackback
4 years 1 month ago

[…] Mark’s Daily Apple Related Posts:Taco Bowl with Crispy Kale ChipsRoasted Cactus Salad with ShrimpBalsamic-Glazed DrumsticksPrimal Moussaka Health Chilaquiles, Primal […]

Steph
Steph
4 years 1 month ago

Weeeeird. I had chilaquiles yesterday (20%!) before reading this post, and was pondering this morning how you’d make them primal. Then I open my browser and see this. Stop reading my mind, MDA!

Freddie
Freddie
4 years 1 month ago
Nothing that you eat is remotely “primal” or “paleo.” Actual paleolithic man ate bark, insects, rodents, pre-agricultural plants, and yes, grains, such as potatoes, sorghum, and wild corn. The diet that you eat consists of meats and vegetables that have undergone millenia of selective breeding and agriculture. The meat you eat is absolutely nothing like the meat eaten by paleolithic humans. The tomatoes and onions in this recipe are also the result of hundreds or thousands of years of selective breeding and are nothing like the vegetables eaten in the paleolithic diet. You want to cut out starchy grains and… Read more »
Jim W
Jim W
4 years 1 month ago

Wow, what a buzz kill, Freddie! You sound like the kind of guy who’d demand a bacteria count on the milk of human kindness. I’d like to see your recipe book… Roach and Rat Rancheros. Yummy! I’m sure you’d get thousands of people to modify their diet in a healthy way, oh, and don’t forget to include a fantastic system of staying in shape with minimal effort, as well. If you have a better recipe for wellness, I’m sure we’d all love to be clued in…

MarkA
MarkA
4 years 1 month ago
They didn’t have computers or books either, so even communicating a good food and exercise plan via these media is decidedly un-paleo. So, score one for yourself for being technically correct. In fact, I was eating broccoli last night and my wife mentioned that there’s no way paleolithic man would have had anything like it. Even basic leafy cruciform vegetables that were probably available evolved to be not eaten – very bitter flavor and loads of toxins when eaten raw. It’s a good thing homo sapiens evolved the ability to use metaphors, so that we can use the eating habits… Read more »
Gene
Gene
4 years 1 month ago

“Actual paleolithic man ate bark, insects, rodents, pre-agricultural plants, and yes, grains, such as potatoes, sorghum, and wild corn.”

And megafauna… I bet those would’ve tasted really good with modern tomato and onion salsa.

Margareth
4 years 1 month ago

Looks really good, loook like u are a good cook, home-made is the best 🙂 try some home made parmesan chips on the side next time.. crunchy and tasty 🙂

trackback
4 years 1 month ago

[…] Primal Chilaquiles  […]

trackback

[…] BLOG: FOOD Share this:FacebookTwitterEmailLike this:LikeBe the first to like […]

Dennis Blair
4 years 1 month ago

Thanks for sharing such a nice recipe I had eaten one of these chilaquiles at my friend’s house and now I will be making one of my own.It really looks delicious.

Jake
Jake
4 years 1 month ago

I believe you are just calling an omelette a chilaquile.

trackback
4 years 1 month ago

[…] Primal Chilaquiles        […]

trackback

[…] article: the missing link – getting enough sleep *another must read* recipe: primal chilaquiles […]

trackback

[…] that. Instead, pour this earthy, smoky, moderately spicy gravy over ground beef, scrambled eggs, chilaquiles, grilled steak or chicken. Or use it (un-thickened) as a braising or poaching liquid for beef, pork […]

trackback
2 years 4 months ago

[…] that. Instead, pour this earthy, smoky, moderately spicy gravy over ground beef, scrambled eggs, chilaquiles, grilled steak or chicken. Or use it (un-thickened) as a braising or poaching liquid for beef, pork […]

trackback

[…] all that. Instead, pour this earthy, smoky, moderately spicy gravy over ground beef, scrambled eggs,chilaquiles, grilled steak or chicken. Or use it (un-thickened) as a braising or poaching liquid for beef, pork […]

trackback

[…] how else can you use this addictive (and convenient) condiment? Fish, salmon cakes, steak and chilaquiles immediately come to […]

wpDiscuz