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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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January 25, 2010

Dear Mark: PUFAs

By Mark Sisson
184 Comments

In last week’s Dear Mark I took up a reader question about trans fats. While we’re on the fat subject, I figured it was a good time to keep the conversation going and cover an email I got last week about polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Thanks to Brent for this one.

I loved your posts on trans fats last week, but now you have me wondering about all the other truths I know but can’t explain. How about polyunsaturated fat? When I was reading the Definitive Guide to Oils, I was having a rough time remembering exactly why PUFAs aren’t recommended. Can you jog my memory, Mark?

Let me take this one apart – separate out the good PUFA from the bad from the downright ugly. We’re talking everything from grains to nuts, corn and canola oil to fish oil. When it comes to PUFAs, it truly is a mixed bag.

What Are They?

Chemically speaking, polyunsaturated fats have more than one (hence the “poly”) double bond in their carbon chain. They’re further determined by the position of these double bonds in relation to the end of the molecule. For example, omega-3s sport a double bond three “links” down from the “methyl” end of the molecule.

These double-bonded carbon links are in essence missing their hydrogen atoms. (As you recall, if all the links have their hydrogen, you’re looking at a fully saturated fat.) Because they’ve got multiple “incomplete” double bonds to their name, polyunsaturated fats are, as a class, chemically unstable and prone to oxidation.

What Do They Do?

PUFAs can be a real Jekyll and Hyde. On the one hand, PUFAs include the essential fatty acids, including our favorite omega-3s. But when oxidation comes into play, we’re looking at a whole different animal. Heating in particular sets a bad course in motion, but simply exposure to air, light and even moisture can incite the process. We’re now looking at lipid peroxides, which initiate a free radical free-for-all. The free radicals make their way through the body pillaging at every turn. Their damage takes a toll on everything from cell membranes, to DNA/RNA strands, to blood vessels (which can then lead to plaque accumulation). The harm adds up over time in the organs and systems of the body and can cause significant impact, including premature aging and skin disease, liver damage, immune dysfunction, and even cancer.

What’s a Good Primal Type To Do?

Grok – and even Grandma – got their fat intake mostly in saturated forms. (Who among us doesn’t love butter, lard, tallow, and the like?) These days, we drown ourselves in PUFAs with all the vegetable oils (typically corn, canola, soybean, sunflower and safflower) we use. It’s a completely unnecessary response to the saturated fat scare that CW has drummed up over the last several decades. Those clowns that think Canola oil, no matter how rancid it’s gotten sitting in a hot warehouse for 10 months, is somehow still preferable to Grandma’s fresh rendered lard.

On the other side of the spectrum, some strict paleo followers, for example, choose to forgo nuts and seeds and their oils. I agree that avoiding PUFAs in general is a good rule of thumb, but I straddle the line – with a little extra time and care – in order to take advantage of what I deem valuable nutrient (PUFA) sources.

I like my nut butter (which I make myself) and occasional seeds for my salads. I buy them raw and as fresh as possible from sources I research. I’m a stickler for proper storage. Opaque containers. Refrigeration. Although I enjoy some nut oils on salads or other dishes now and then, I rarely buy them because I don’t want the remainder going bad in my frig. (Besides, I’d rather eat the whole foods in most cases than bother with a lineup of oils that had to go through at least some processing. I keep a couple good bottles of great quality cold-pressed olive oil (which, as you’ll remember, is mostly monounsaturated anyway) around and use them up quickly. Look for the darkest bottles you can find. Dated products are even better.

As for fish oil, I use and suggest the same basic principles. Buy the freshest products you can find. Buying direct from a reputable manufacturer offers the advantage of minimizing storage and transport time/scenarios. Some research suggests that taking fish oil with vitamin E reduces oxidation within the body. Refrigerate fish oil supplements to prolong freshness, but use them up in a timely manner.

Finally, I make sure my diet is chock-full of antioxidants (including vitamin E) and minerals to counter any oxidative stress from PUFAs or any other source. As careful as I try to be with PUFAs, there’s nothing wrong with a little extra insurance.

Now it’s your turn. Let me know your take – and intake (or not) – of PUFAs. Thanks as always for the questions and comments, and keep ‘em coming!

TAGS:  is it primal?

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184 Comments on "Dear Mark: PUFAs"

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Biglee
Biglee
6 years 7 months ago

So much to know about the almighty fat,
Where does it end!

mhikl
mhikl
2 years 7 months ago
It can be easy. Paleo diets foster fresh, nutritiously uncomplicated animal fats- bovine, lamb, pork, chicken (some), wild salmon, sea food, elk etc; it’s all there. Fresh nuts that have been soaked 24+ hours to get rid of enzyme inhibitors, water changed three times getting clearer with each rinse, then dried, adds to variety. Low calorie veg (if you must) some wild berries and Bob’s your uncle, life becomes so simple. Worst bugaboo? The idea that eating is supposed to be full of variety, exciting and entertaining. There is so much more to entertainment than a meal with dishes (work)… Read more »
Liz Paul
Liz Paul
1 year 10 months ago

I am fed up with the whole hype concerning good/bad oils!

I try to keep an open mind. I started using Coconut Oil in place of my usual Virgin Olive Oil, which I have used forever, I am 74.

The next thing I know. I had to get the plumber in, sink was blocked with …yes …you’ve guessed …coconut oil residue! Olive oil can’t do that!

How ayone can recommend something, which returns to solid when it cools beats me. I should have listened to my instinct.

Back to Virgin Olive Oil for me….Best of Luck in your searching.

Rick
Rick
1 year 8 months ago
Coconut oil turns to liquid in the mid 80’s F. Fortunately our body temperature is in the upper 90’s. All you can take from your experience is that since pipes generally run below room temperature, coconut oil will clog them. What you’re saying is akin to saying that we shouldn’t eat salt because it causes snails to dissolve. If you were to cut the fat off of your midsection and put it in the fridge, it would turn solid just like the fat on the side of a cut of steak. Please continue to keep an open mind. Ponder this-… Read more »
Rick
Rick
1 year 8 months ago
One more thing, Olive oil is primarily Omega 9. Your body can make all the O9 it needs so using Olive oil is only providing you with energy. If you just need more calories that’s a fine way to get them, but olive oil is really a lesser of evils. Your body can make all the fat it needs as long as you provide AL and ALA (omega 6 and omega 3). See if you can look for sources of AL and ALA that aren’t rancid or hydrogenated and your body will take care of the rest.
Viola
Viola
1 year 3 months ago

Stop pouring it down the drain!! What a misguided reason to stop using a very healthy oil. I use a paper towel to remove any left over oil before washing in the sink or dishwasher. You might have more challenges than not knowing how to keep oil out of the sink.

Simon
Simon
1 year 1 month ago

are you worried about your sink or your arteries? fats are saturated or unsaturated depending on the temperature of the organism, humans are warm, so we are made of saturates, which are the most stable fat for our body temperature,

KetoMan
KetoMan
10 months 13 days ago

Coconut oil is terrific for sauteing. It has a high smoke point, and is therefore ideal (it’s also great straight from the container!). I use it every night to pan-fry my favorite provisional meats. But why throw the left-over oil down the drain? I always consume (yes…I literally drink) the coconut oil, and natural fat that gets rendered from the meats I saute. Nothing goes to waste.

Jake
Jake
8 months 23 days ago

I use a hair dryer to warm up the u bend in the pipes and then I can usually clear the blockage by using a toilet plunger.

jamiebelle
jamiebelle
6 years 7 months ago

The book The Coconut Oil Miracle does a really great job of explaining fatty acids and why the bad ones are bad and the good ones are good. 🙂

Anthony
6 years 7 months ago

Videos with Bruce Fife, author of The Coconut Oil Miracle: http://www.ihealthtube.com/aspx/search.aspx?sp=BRUCE++FIFE&displayType=videos

Ez
Ez
5 years 14 days ago

Thanks for the video links. I read his book years ago and was turned onto coconut oil. It’s nice to hear the info playing while I research other sites!

Jim Purdy
6 years 7 months ago

It’s all too complicated, Mark.

You need to write your own book of food rules. like Michael Pollan’s, with these changes:.

1. Have food rules
2. Mostly simple rules
3. Not too many (like 10)

“Mark’s 10 Food Commandments,” maybe?

The 50 Best Health Blogs

Cameron
Cameron
6 years 7 months ago

I’m not much of a multivitamin person – I just know that they have a TON of ingredients. Do most of the name brands (like Centrum) have enough antioxidants in them to be useful, or we better off taking something more specific?

einstein
einstein
4 years 5 months ago

multivitamins are downright harmful, avoid taking them. fish oil, vitamin B12 (1000mg/week and D3 (5000IU/day) are the only ones that can and should be taken.

Rich
3 years 1 month ago

Vitamin D is rat poison and without proper Vit K is suspected as causing arterial calcification. Vit D kills rats by mobilizing calcium in the body. This is why people ingest it, but the notion that it magically put it into your bones is bad science.

Vitamin D is produced by the skin (actually pre-vitamin D) but vitamin D is never ingested orally in large amounts. Most food contains absolutely 0 vitamin D except fish oil and mushrooms.

Get your vitamin D from the sun.

Dave
Dave
2 years 8 months ago

Not sure where your sources come from but Vit D DEFICIENCY causes hardening of arteries.

If you’re eating a cup of kale or spinach a day (and you should be), you’re covered fro Vitamin K.

Dave
Dave
2 years 8 months ago

But having said that, 5000 UI seems like overkill.

neeters
neeters
1 year 6 months ago

when you live in Northern Canada and only have sunshine 6 weeks a year and below zero temps for the rest it’s impossible to get vitamin D from the sun. I personally had to take 50 000 units vitamin D weekly for several months and now am prescribed 5000 per day. After two years of supplements my levels are normal and I’m finally beginning to feel better. Not everyone in the world lives in warm sunny climates!

Simon
Simon
1 year 1 month ago

centrum contains iron, only take it if you’re menstruating or have a large parasite burden

Kishore
Kishore
6 years 7 months ago
Good info Mark! A few things that come to my mind: 1. Two most important things to buy organic are coffee and butter. These are the two most chemically laden foods you can buy if you don’t choose organic. 2. There’s more olive oil sold today than is produced, the additive? Seems to be soy oil. To test if your olive oil is pure, leave it in the fridge overnight. There should be sediments at the bottom and a slight cloudy texture in the middle of the bottle (I haven’t tried it yet). 4. Do not eat Peanut Butter, even… Read more »
Gina
6 years 7 months ago

and remember the peanut is a legume 🙂

Tara tootie
6 years 7 months ago

I just decanted my fish oil from a large bottle to smaller one for ease of use since it was getting low. Thing is, it still smelled fishy but a little bit rancid too??? I spent a lot of money on this fish oil (!) and have kept it 100% propely stored. Is it possible it went bad? OR, should I just use it b/c its not a concern???

Kishore
Kishore
6 years 7 months ago

What fish oil product did you buy?

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[…] Original post by Mark Sisson […]

Elizabeth
6 years 7 months ago
I’m just going to comment with a quote from another comment I made on a similar post about vegeteble oils: “I do think people forget animal fat is NOT 100% saturated – not even close. Even if you ate only animal fats you’d still be getting in a good deal of monounsaturated and some polyunsaturated fats. There’s really no need to go out of your way to eat any other kind of oil, besides a little omega-3 supplementation if you think you need it.” In fact, animal fats from grass-fed/pastured have an excellent omega 6:3 ratio. I don’t think eating… Read more »
Kishore
Kishore
6 years 7 months ago

Grass fed beef only has 25mg of omega-3 per ounce while corn-fed has about 10-12mg. Either way, beef is not a great source of omega-3, you need a solid fish oil supplement. Good reasons to eat organic grass-fed beef? CLA content,low pesticide load, humanely finished (lower levels of adrenaline in the cow while slaughtered) and no hormones (eventhough there is some debate that animal hormones degrade as low as 135-150F, so if you cook your meat enough, no worries).

Jimmy Hays Nelson
6 years 7 months ago

So what would the Udo’s 3-6-9 be? I started using that on my salad when I started reading the Primal Blueprint- instead of just normal Olive Oil.
Thoughts?

Courtney
Courtney
1 year 6 months ago
Omega 9 is literally olive oil. It contains oleic acid which is found in olive oil and canola oil. Don’t bother wasting your money on supplements that sound fancy. Omega 3’s are from fatty fish or from EPA and DHA supplements, while omega 6 is found pretty regulary in most diets: corn oil, soybean oil, cottonseed, and safflower oils. Omega 6 is used in a lot of processed and fried foods, so normally people should be more concerned with their Omega 3’s. Either eat fatty fish at least 2x a week or take a EPA and DHA supplement. I would… Read more »
Luc
Luc
6 years 7 months ago

Dear Mark,
great post, as always.
I was reading this article recently, on antioxydant, which indicates that they could in fact be detrimental to metabolic changes after exercice – I was wondering was is your take on this?
Luc
http://www.pnas.org/content/106/21/8665.long

Mark Sisson
6 years 7 months ago

Luc, that’s a very unconvincing study, in my opinion. There are twenty years of study results favoring antioxidants and exercise. They need to do a whole lot more in this area to even begin to convince me to change my regimen.

Per
6 years 7 months ago

“Grok – and even Grandma – got their fat intake mostly in saturated forms.”

Don’t forget the fat from nuts, almonds, seeds, wild olives, fish and shellfish!

bfaber87
6 years 7 months ago

I like to keep it simple…

-Coconut oil or ghee (homemade) for high heat cooking. Perfect oils for cooking a steak on the stove or making a stir-fry.

-Olive oil to dress my salads and give them flavor. I will only eat olive oil raw, no heating.

-I take fish oil daily.

I don’t have access to local, grass-fed lard or tallow, but the research makes me believe they are very good to use for cooking.

redcatbicycliste
redcatbicycliste
6 years 7 months ago
Most vitamin E oil [capsules] is made from soy oil. I take fermented cod liver oil daily. Because of oxidation, I take it with red palm oil, which is naturally high in full-spectrum vitamin E oil and saturated fat. A few years ago The New Yorker magazine did a story on [imported] olive oil (perhaps the article is on-line). Because demand is greater than supply, many of the producers/companies add soy bean oil to it. So, you have to be really, really careful that the olive oil you purchased (particularly, from Spain) is 100% olive oil. I’m lucky, in that… Read more »
Aaron Blaisdell
6 years 7 months ago

Yup, that’s why I’ve switched to using olive oil only from California sources. I can even get it at the local farmer’s market.

I also use fermented high-vitamin CLO. I could be wrong, but I was under the impression that the fermentation process actually preserved and protected the oil from oxidation. I still consume it within about two months of opening the bottle, but I store it at room temp to make it easier to poor into the spoon. If kept in the fridge it gets very cloudy and viscous.

Jen
6 years 7 months ago

Great article Mark! Awesome info! There are just so many kinds of fats: good fats and bad fats! I take my fish oil. Antioxidants are so good for us. I liked what you said about getting the freshest products. That will help! Enjoyed the article, thanks!

Jen

Laura
Laura
5 years 7 months ago

If oxygen radicals are so bad, why is exercise so good? Think about it. We need occasional intense oxidative stress to keep our endogenous production of antioxidants in top shape.

Scotti
Scotti
3 years 5 months ago
Late to the party, I know, but since this is highly read I thought I’d answer: Laura, the most oxidative forms of exercise (marathon running, heavy lifting, etc.) are actually NOT good for you. That is to say, regular practitioners of extreme exercise do not live longer than the general population and it is precisely because of oxidative stress. Those who exercise moderately (brisk walk, casual cycling, etc.) show the greatest life extension benefits as well as quality of life). Regular, but not frequent, moderate lifting (or push/pull ups) and even less frequent exertion (sprinting, hard cycling) for very short… Read more »
Katelyn
Katelyn
6 years 7 months ago

There is enough minimal PUFA in meat (beef, pork, etc.) to give you all that is required. I would not touch vegetable oils or nuts.

Jack
Jack
6 years 7 months ago

An interesting article you may want to check out if youre taking fish oil http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/fishoil.shtml

chris
chris
11 months 12 days ago

A bit late on commenting here….but YES I read this ray peat article recently too. And it seriously makes me question the use of any PUFA or Fish Oils!! Sounds to me like fish oils are all just a bunch of rancid and toxic fats and also that Essential fatty acids are a total con! Not ‘essential’ at all. It just gets repeated over and over and over that EFA’s and DHA are so good for our health but are they really??? I would love to hear Mark’s opinion of this ray peat article?

Marie
Marie
6 years 7 months ago

So which side of the fence do you come down on for Sunbutter?

Pikaia
Pikaia
6 years 7 months ago

I researched this online, and found that there’s about three times as much PUFA as MUFA or saturated fat in sunflower seeds. And of the PUFA, it is almost all omega-6; there’s only trace omega-3. So sunflower seed butter wouldn’t rank too highly. Most commercially produced sunbutter has a ton of sugar in it anyway.

Alex
Alex
6 years 7 months ago

No natural fat is exclusively made up of saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids but some permutation of all three.

You could just eat animal sources of fat (no nuts or seeds) and get plenty of polyunsaturated fats – including the omega-3s from fatty/oily fish like salmon.

This is the direction I take.

Icarus
Icarus
6 years 7 months ago
As do I. I don’t even think eating fish is strictly necessary as long as your sources for mammal/poultry meat are pastured, since pastured meat typically has a good ratio of omega-6 fats to omega-3s in the first place. It’s also arguable that the genus Homo evolved in the grasslands of central, eastern, and southern Africa, as did our predecessors, the Australopithecines, and so would not have had much access to fish anyway. They were, however, evidently big ruminant eaters, which is one reason why I like to base my diet on beef and lamb (nothing to do with those… Read more »
frank
frank
6 years 7 months ago

nothign!

Julot
6 years 7 months ago
QUITTING fish oil was one of the best health decisions I took lately. Heavy metals, lowered immunity, disturbed glycemia were my primary reasons for trying it. To ensure a proper supply of intact PUFA in my diet, I get a tablespoon of freshly grinded flaxseed and a teaspoon of a sunflower/evening primrose oil mix in my cottage cheese every morning (all organic and cold press). The list of benefits over a few weeks are spectacular — especially in terms of weight and appetite control, mood stabilization, stamina, stopped gum bleeding, and relief of all sort of aches. This convinced me… Read more »
Alex
Alex
6 years 7 months ago

I agree – just because omega-3’s were the ‘darling’ of the moment in health & fitness circles, everyone seemed to think the more the better! We only need them in very small amounts daily – the same with omega-6.

Another thing that annoys me is this striving for a 2:1 or 1:1 ratio between omega-3 and omega-6. If you look at which EFA is required for (and contained within) which tissues and cells in the entire body, you will find we have a requirement for around four times the omega-6 to omega-3! So a ratio of 4:1 is more realistic.

Tanya
Tanya
1 year 7 months ago

What exactly did the fish oil do to you that you didn’t like? Or what clued you in to the idea that it wasn’t for you? I’m taking (what I think is) high-quality fish oil and I’m gaining weight. Haven’t changed my (paleo-style) eating habits.

Tanya
Tanya
1 year 7 months ago

PS my question was for Julot but can be for anyone who quit fish oil (weight issues, or reasons ??)

Marc Simonson
Marc Simonson
6 years 7 months ago
HI MARK, IT’S THE INDIVIDUAL’S GENETICS AND THE FOOD ENVIRONMENT THE GENETICS EVOLVED IN, THAT IS THE KEY TO OPTIMUM HEALTH. DR. JARVIS COMMENTED ABOUT THIS IN HIS 1958 BOOK (STILL IN PRINT) CALLED “FOLK MEDICINE”. HE EXAMPLE WAS, THAT AS YOU MOVE FROM THE MEDITERRANEAN AREA NORTH THROUGH EUROPE UP TO THE NORDIC AREA, THE GOWING SEASONS BECOME SHORTER, AND THUS THERE IS LESS VARIETY AND DIFFERENT FOODS THAT GROW IN EACH AREA. I CALL IT “LATITUDINAL NUTRITIONAL GENETICS”. GENES DON’T CHANGE FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS, BUT YOU CAN MOVE A BODY’S (GENES) ALL OVER THE WORLD, BUT YOU… Read more »
Jennifer Cote
3 years 4 months ago

Marc, that would help explain why what works for one person may not work for another. I had thought of how we might genetically be predisposed to a certain diet as ideal, but I hadn’t thought of how we humans can now so readily move wherever we want. Our jeans can arrive anywhere, but our genes might be slow to catch up, haha…

Mark Sisson
6 years 7 months ago

Marc, no need to shout…The reason you don’t see this taken into account is because most of my readers live in parts of the world where DNA has mixed so thoroughly that we/they have become one giant international DNA mosaic retaining little, if any, of the possible localized genetic adaptions to a region in which ALL prior 300 generations lived and ate. That’s an example (one of many, actually) of why blood-type diets fail.

Alex
Alex
6 years 7 months ago

I agree – humans are the most homogeneous species on the planet. There is very little genetic difference between races, so little in fact that on a genetic level we are all one race – the human race.

What people mistake for genetic differences are actually epigenetic (how our environment influences which genes are expressed or not depending on where we live and what we eat). This can be passed down from generation to generation but can be altered relatively quickly, unlike actual genetic changes.

Jennifer Cote
3 years 4 months ago

Oh, yeah… that makes sense, Mark!

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[…] Polyunsaturated Fat […]

Raine
6 years 7 months ago
Here are the oils and fats I use: Extra virgin coconut oil and olive oil a small amount of cold-pressed Grapeseed oil Real butter from pasture-raised cattle Tallow – from pastured cattle Lard – from pastured hogs Green Pastures Blue Ice Royal Fermented Cod Liver Oil and Butter Oil mixture – it’s fabulous and completely digestible, even for people who have compromised immune/digestion (which applies to many people in developed countries and those who eat the Standard American Diet). Here’s a link to this wonderful product – best I know of on the market: http://www.greenpasture.org/retail/?t=products&a=line&i=royal Here’s an article I wrote… Read more »
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[…] Article courtesy of Mark’s Daily Apple I loved your posts on trans fats last week, but now you have me wondering about all the other truths I know but can’t explain. How about polyunsaturated fat? When I was reading the Definitive Guide to Oils, I was having a rough time remembering exactly why PUFAs aren’t recommended. Can you jog my memory, Mark? […]

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Jon Rigney
Jon Rigney
6 years 1 month ago

How about pinenut oil? Is it healthy?

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[…] PUFAs: Vegetable Oil. Ick. […]

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[…] Pace). I suspect that their reliance on real food and low intakes of processed and high omega-6 PUFA seed oils also contribute to their metabolic […]

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[…] Pace). I suspect that their reliance on real food and low intakes of processed and high omega-6 PUFA seed oils also contribute to their metabolic […]

Vince N.
Vince N.
5 years 8 months ago
“4. Do not eat Peanut Butter, even the natural kind; it contains a mould that has phyto-estrogens in it.” Then you should also drop a lot of other food deemed healthy… Table 1. Foods high in phytoestrogen content. Phytoestrogen food sources Phytoestrogen content (?g/100g) Flax seed 379380 Soy beans 103920 Tofu 27150.1 Soy yogurt 10275 Sesame seed 8008.1 Flax bread 7540 Multigrain bread 4798.7 Soy milk 2957.2 Hummus 993 Garlic 603.6 Mung bean sprouts 495.1 Dried apricots 444.5 Alfalfa sprouts 441.4 Dried dates 329.5 Sunflower seed 216 Chestnuts 210.2 Olive oil 180.7 Almonds 131.1 Green bean 105.8 Peanuts 34.5 Onion… Read more »
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[…] in the body. Hmm. Even if I trusted their claim that these new fats would act just like normal PUFAs, only without the oxidation, I’d still pass. Heck, the main problem is that we get too much […]

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[…] given ad libitum access to standard rat chow (which usually resembles the SAD: a disgusting mix of vegetable oils and sucrose). While caloric intake did not change between groups, the rats given non-caloric […]

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[…] given ad libitum access to standard rat chow (which usually resembles the SAD: a disgusting mix of vegetable oils and sucrose). While caloric intake did not change between groups, the rats given non-caloric […]

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[…] three weeks before trying it. That means getting rid of all excess sugar, grains, legumes, and vegetable oils, all of which conflict with satiety, metabolic function, and insulin signaling. If you are […]

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[…] figured that the more people saw that they weren’t alone in avoiding grains, legumes, sugar, vegetable oils, shoes, treadmills, and faulty Conventional Wisdom, the more they’d realize that going Primal […]

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[…] Two tablespoons of the average stuff gives you about 2.8 grams of linoleic acid. That’s less omega-6 than most lard and poultry fat, if you’re counting, especially if you use it sparingly as a […]

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[…] predicament: We haven’t sleuthed out any mechanism that could explain why DHA (but not other polyunsaturated fats) promotes rapid tumor growth. Nor do we know of any way trans fats could save a prostate from […]

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[…] predicament: We haven’t sleuthed out any mechanism that could explain why DHA (but not other polyunsaturated fats) promotes rapid tumor growth. Nor do we know of any way trans fats could save a prostate from […]

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[…] Mark Sisson, author of The Primal Blueprint, explains why SaFa are healthy and why PUFa are unhealthy. […]

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[…] Heat unstable, prone to oxidation inside and outside of the body – Polyunsaturated fats are prone to oxidative damage when exposed to heat, air, and/or light. The PUFAs we eat are often […]

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[…] […]

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[…] Primal (no vegetable oils, low sugar, no grains or legumes) is perfectly safe.  Avoiding PUFAS, gluten and excessive lectins will help decrease inflammation. Reducing sugar intake by avoiding […]

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[…] (if you care about such things) increases the saturated fat, the omega-3s, and cuts down on those very controversial polys & omega-6s. Next time around I am going to try coconut oil in place of the olive oil, still […]

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