Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Mark's Daily Apple

4 Jan

Clickativity

101 Great Anti-Aging Tips

ChanceAgrella
4 Jan

Parkinson’s Politics = Pressure Cooker

Here is a razor-sharp example of excellent, detailed, honest medical research reporting. Unfortunately, with words like ergot and agonist, it’s also as relentlessly boring as a Del Monte fruit cup without the little pink “cherries”. No wonder people are confused about the latest medical findings! Where are the resources to interpret this jargon?

Oh yeah, here, that’s where! Whew.

And here. (An anonymous MD’s personal take on medical practice. Often quite interesting.)

And here. (Ok, so this one’s a little dry, but you can scope where we review studies.)

Anyway, this example in particular found that certain types of Parkinson’s drugs may cause major heart problems in certain types of patients. The good news is that a more effective Parkinson’s drug appears to be near completion thanks to the KDI breakthrough from last year (KDI is a protein that appears to play a role in preventing certain neurological problems). KDI treatment may even help prevent ALS and strokes.

There’s another huge issue surrounding Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases that I want to draw particular attention to, because it’s infuriating. According to this article, scientists are having a hard time effectively researching potential causes and cures because industry lawsuits – from chemical companies to welding groups – jump all over medical studies that link environmental causes to these diseases. This is something you can personally help to change with this clickativity. It will take about 45 seconds. I think it’s more than worth it.

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3 Jan

Wednesday Wrap

Worker Bees’ Daily Bites

1) Wash Those Hands, Honey!

Bird flu and mad cow may be glamorously scary, but what should be making more headlines is the newest, ugliest superbug crawling around gyms, daycares and door handles. Fortunately, it’s easy to stop if you wash your hands after hanging around public places. Clickativity.

verserk

2) What’s that? You Frolicked in Acid?

Speak up, would ya! Folic acid is good for your ears. We’re impressed with this nice little study, which was long-term, placebo-controlled, and looked at both men and women. Very well done, Annals, very well done. And well done is actually quite…rare. (Come on, you know you’re smiling.)

pillllllls

Check out a great way to get folic acid here.

3) Harvard Doesn’t Like Uncle Sam’s Food Pyramid, Either

Harvard has released an alternative food pyramid and nutrition guide. It’s a really great way to spend 16 bucks because, although the US pyramid is both free and pretty, the Harvard version flat-out rocks. Harvard oh-so-politely counters the so-called “balanced diet” approach as being totally meaningless (which it is). Seriously, are things like “try to eat more whole grains” and “avoid fat” the best recommendations our government can come up with? Evidently so. (Although the FDA does have that nifty new Labelman tutorial online to help you understand nutrition labels and feel like a five-year-old simultaneously.)

Instead, with the Harvard guide, specific foods are recommended. How cool is that? Things like good fats (because they lower bad cholesterol and raise good cholesterol), veggies rich in antioxidants (because they may prevent cancer and they fight inflammation and stress), and lots of lean protein. Yum!

In fact, Harvard makes a very convincing case that a high-protein diet is not only safe for the cardiovascular-concerned crowd, but that sensible high-protein diets (no baconfests, people) are actually better for the heart than bran muffins and bread machines. Which is what Mark has been espousing all along – pretty interesting stuff!

We really recommend purchasing the guide if you can. Kudos to Harvard for having the gumption to address real nutrition with real science and real recommendations. Although, colorful stripes are fun. We’re very impressed with the FDA for staying inside the lines so well.

pyramid2
3 Jan

Stop Plumbing the Depths of My Heart

Here’s an excellent interview with Dr. South Beach Diet about the need to prevent heart problems instead of digging around in people’s arteries like they’re rusty pipes. The invasive world of stents and scrapes is expensive, dangerous, and just unnecessary.

You can prevent heart problems with some easy lifestyle choices:

– Eat vegetables at every meal.

– Go easy on anything starchy, pale, processed or sweet (or better yet, avoid altogether).

– Get cardiovascular exercise at least 90 minutes a week:

jog, walk, swim, run or play a sport

– Don’t smoke.

– Drink in moderation.

– Minimize physical and emotional stress.

– Watch the sodium!

– Cut out fast food and junk food completely.

heart
3 Jan

Healthy Eating 101

gwlogonew

Regardless of whether you are taking a comprehensive multi-vitamin that provides you with full spectrum nutrient support; it is always important to eat a well-rounded diet as you can’t expect vitamins to completely make up for poor eating habits. So which foods should you incorporate into your eating plan? A good place to start is the World’s Healthiest Foods website. This site has compiled a list of select vegetables, fruits, beans, meats and grains they consider to be at the top of the nutrition ladder. Each item on the list has a detailed profile describing its health benefits, nutrient information, and how it is best stored and enjoyed. The site also offers over a hundred recipes using these foods and provides a recipe assistant to help find the dish that is right for you. If you would like in-depth information about anything from bell peppers to flaxseed, as well as suggestions on how to integrate them into your diet, check out this comprehensive resource.

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