Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Mark's Daily Apple

21 Mar

Takin’ the Sting Out

Worker Bees’ Daily Bites:

Here’s the fresh mix, Apples! You sassy little things, you.

Food Police: Dangerously Close to a Sherlock Award

Since we’ve already so graciously awarded the CDC with our monthly MOTO, the food police have narrowly escaped with dignity intact – for this month. Fresh from the fryer: they’re warning us that Chinese food is unhealthy.

takeout

Stickerbandit Flickrstream

Hmm…is anyone really surprised to learn that a box of Chinese takeout is not the cornucopia of health we’d like it to be?

Everyone Loves a Good Bribe!

Did you know that doctors routinely accept rewards from pharmaceutical companies for pushing prescribing new drugs? Cheerful instant messages and pats on the back these rewards are not. We’re talking cold, hard cash, and lots of it. Best of all, most states don’t really have laws in place to make sure this bidness gets disclosed.

coinage

Hyperbolis Flickrstream

Myths of Health

And you were just getting your fillings replaced (someone call Ludacris, quick). Here are the web’s top health myths that manage to persist in spite of all good sense.

Listen Up, Ladies

Another reason to admit that veggies are ‘licious.

bellpepperparty

Tasty Tip

Here’s an important, and easy, health tip for keeping your weight loss goals on track.

food police, Chinese food, health myths, vegetables, cancer prevention, pharmaceutical

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21 Mar

The Fuming Fuji Says No to Cheese and Crackers

FUJ

The Fuming Fuji is outraged at the marketing of toxic food, especially when it is aimed at the small fry. This week, the Fuming Fuji has decided to have a serious problem with cheese and crackers.

Oh, Fuming Fuji, you say, I can’t believe you would have a problem with this healthy, natural snack! Maybe you should get your blood pressure checked, Fuji.

The Fuming Fuji says no!

The claim: Cheese and crackers provide calcium, protein, and fiber to children! I thought cheese and crackers were healthy for kids. What’s not to love?

The catch: Yes, Fuji agrees, the two most processed foods on earth are a wonderful combination for children everywhere. In fact, here is another great one: how about pepperoni slices on potato chips?

The comeback: That sounds kind of good, actually.

The conclusion: The Fuji did not just hear this! Cheese is reformed baby cow food. In fact, if the Fuji thinks about it too much, bad things will surely happen. Beware, oh ye lovers of blubber & biscuits, beware. Slapping cheddar curd cakes atop dead ground grain squares is not a wise or nutritious practice. The Fuji admits it is probably fun, though (but not as fun as fuming, which surpasses all other verbs).

The catchphrase: Cheese & Cracker conglomerate may squash the Fuji, but he still got the juice!

Disclaimer: Mark Sisson and the Worker Bees do not necessarily endorse the views of the Fuming Fuji. We are appropriately dazzled, however.

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21 Mar

Reduce Stress, Like, Yesterday

We’ve all heard (and don’t forget experienced!) that major life changes like getting married, giving birth, moving or starting a new job can be unbearably stressful. But it isn’t always the big transitions that take the heftiest health toll. Day-to-day stress – the kind you ignore that accumulates over time – can create detrimental health effects on your body.

So, the next time you begrudgingly roll out of bed at 6 a.m. because you’ve got two kids to feed and drop off at school before you head into the fray of congested traffic and board meetings, think about taking time to undo all the pent-up tension with some of the terrific tips that can be found at the following handy websites. 20 minutes a day of “love insurance” (as in lovin’ your own life!) makes all the difference!

My favorite suggestions from around the web this week:

“Talk to yourself.”

15 Tips to Cope with a Demanding Life

“Attempt to Control Absolutely Everything.” (They’re kidding, of course.)

5 Ideas for Stressful Living

“Enjoy Life’s Little Luxuries”

Fight Stress! (Who’s biased?)

“Be passionate – About how your work improves people’s lives.”

A Clear Eye

“Be Mindful”

Your Brain on Multi-Tasking

stress

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20 Mar

Healthy Buzz

Worker Bees’ Daily Bites:

Here’s the sugar-free wrap up!

Run, Don’t Walk, to This Commentary

A terrific and compelling post that neatly sums up the arrogance and bias that is problematic in scientific research. Be sure to read it.

How Do Doctors Think?

Well, it turns out…pretty much like the rest of us. They are humans, after all, and they make plenty of mistakes. That shouldn’t be too alarming (though it’s certainly ringing bells around the web). It’s just further evidence that you need to get second opinions, do your research, and have confidence in your ability to take responsibility for your own health. Health doesn’t happen on autopilot.
steth

Raising Healthy Kids

And it doesn’t include Nutripals. Catch this excellent and personal piece on the intersection of vegetarianism, fear-o-fat (a national pastime?), and raising truly healthy kids.

What’s Going to Replace the 5-a-Day Campaign?

A juggler.

juggler

That’s right, this festive medieval friend will now be showing up on anything that has a serving of fruits or veggies in it – including (drum roll please) processed foods. It’s all part of the new “More Matters” campaign. Hey, it beats Labelman. The idea is that marketing anything with fruits or veggies in it will work better if there is a brand identity attached. Like Nike, but not really.

Our take is that this is just one more way for processed food manufacturers to make misleading health claims. We debunked another meaningless marketing measure back in January – click it out and scroll to the bottom to find out what the U.S. government defines as “lean”.

Think about it: do we really need a juggler on a bag of apples, or a pack of lettuce? Of course not – people know this is produce. And evidence shows people already know they aren’t eating enough of it, and while they’re not getting enough – yet – there has been some modest improvement (an insightful comment on part of the problem: how we define the data affects how we interpret it).

So, why replace the ol’ fiver campaign with a simple icon, if not to give food manufacturers one more way to shill their processed faux food nuggets? Does anyone think the juggler is for the orange growers of Florida, or the onion farmers of Walla Walla? Or is it for the juice and popsicle and snack slingers? (As long as they keep the product’s sodium and fat under reasonable control, all bets are off.)

Sounds like a nice idea, but like the pretty, newish food pyramid, it’s so vague and high-concept, it’s meaningless.

prettygood

More Matters, 5-a-Day, How Doctors Think

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20 Mar

Mark’s Daily Apple Wins Bloggy Award!

How neat is that? Thanks, Bloggy Awards! They gave us so many positive comments, we’re all blushing over here! They also offered a helpful piece of constructive criticism: shorten up some of the posts (ahem).

What do you think, Apples? And what would you like to see more of?
You can check out the entire review here. Now please excuse us while we bask in the glow…

© 2014 Mark's Daily Apple

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