Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Mark's Daily Apple

24 Aug

Fun Facts About Boring Fruits

Lunchbox staples like bananas are more interesting – and nutritious – than you might think. Even the apples have a special side. Wow your friends tonight with these scintillating factoids, friends:

Nugget 1: Apples

An apple a day keeps the doctor away. You’ve all heard it before, but here’s an interesting…slice…of knowledge that gives it further credence. A flavonoid called quercetin may protect the brain from damage that triggers neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. It turns out that apples (specifically the apple’s skin) contain higher levels of quercetin than almost every other fruit and veggie. Research continues to show that there is something to the age old adage after all.

Keep reading…

24 Aug

In Search of a Good Friday Stretch

yoga rash? uh oh!Hi gang! Here are a few cool facts about yoga and why simple stretching techniques are healthy for adults and the seedlings alike.

1. Lung Relief

Many of us never stretch our sides. Doing this is excellent for the lungs (and you don’t even have to say ommmmm). Stretching your sides also reduces stored tension in the chest cavity. By improving flexibility and expanding those ribs, you will breathe easier, which is always a wonderful way to restore a sense of relaxation. (Breathing from the base of the torso, rather than the upper chest, is an instant way to calm down.)

Keep reading…

23 Aug

The Other Egg

Reader Stephan emailed me earlier about some very smart fuel you might want to consider: duck eggs. Apparently duck eggs are incredibly rich in nutrition – 100% of your daily B12 (well, by government standards anyway). And apparently those who are allergic to chicken eggs can frequently still do well with duck eggs. Never tried ‘em myself, but I think I will. Anyone else tried them or any other unusual eggs?
Keep reading…

23 Aug

Early Humans Chewed Gum

ancient gumAnother amusing “primal” tidbit, everyone: early humans chewed gum. Archaeologists have found a 5,000-year-old piece of preserved tree gum with clearly imprinted neolithic teeth marks. The gum is birch bark tar, which exerts an antiseptic effect on tissues. It’s likely that early humans chewed the phenolic tar to stave off gum infections. Move over, Trident.

Keep reading…

© 2014 Mark's Daily Apple

Subscribe to the Newsletter and Get a Free Copy
of Mark Sisson's Fitness eBook and more!