Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Mark's Daily Apple

24 Apr

The Fuming Fuji Says No to Little Einsteins Cereal

FUJ

The Fuming Fuji is outraged at the marketing of toxic food, especially when it is aimed at the small fry. This week, the Fuji has decided to have a serious problem with Little Einsteins cereal from General Mills.

But, Fuming Fuji, you say, kids need whole grain and calcium!

The Fuming Fuji says no!

The claim: Fuji, your blasphemous true colors have been revealed. Who would say no to whole grain and calcium? 1 in 10 children don’t get enough grain in their diet. General Mills says cereal is a great way to change this!

The catch: Fuji admits you have caught me in a semantic trap. Good for you. But, I do not say no to fiber and calcium. I say no to these not-genius-at-all candy nuggets that belong in a black hole…known as the trash can.

Who said kids need grains? Why the obsession with obesity-inducing starch for fiber? Only 1 in 10 children get “enough” whole grains? Wonderful! If only that number were zero!

The comeback: Well. A little vehement, don’t you think, Fuji? Look, kids need to eat more grains. Otherwise the corn, soy and wheat industries will fail. Is that really what you want, you bitter little apple? Plus, if you eat these Einstein “nuggets” with milk, you get 10% of your DV of calcium, and that’s why GM can claim to be a “good source of calcium”. Aren’t you guys always talking about the need for fiber and vitamins?

The conclusion: All right, I am really about to fume very hard now. Beware. The Fuji is very much in favor of fiber and vitamins, as stated before. But if you think that cereal made from dehydrated old cheap grains is the brainiest source of fiber, or that 10% of the DV of calcium (added only from Big Moo, not the cereal!) is a “good source”, then the Fuji does not think you would qualify for Mensa at all. But maybe the FDA.

The catchphrase: Little Einsteins cereal? Relativity, all right.

Disclaimer: Mark Sisson and the Worker Bees do not necessarily endorse the views of the Fuming Fuji. No geniuses were harmed in the publishing of this post.

Source: Food Processing, Again

More Fuming Fuji

Technorati Tags: , , ,

23 Apr

Quick Clicks

Worker Bees’ Daily Bites:

Before you call it a day, check out these links:

It’s a Bad Day for the American Diet

Michael Pollan (of the best-selling Omnivore’s Dilemma) explains why cheap food makes us fat.

Getting on the Nerves

A new link is discovered between bowel disease and nerves.

Fast Food Isn’t Healthy?!

A new study finds that fast food causes high blood pressure. Study participants who ate low-fat, high-sugar meals (like Fruit Loops and Sunny D) didn’t see their blood pressure spike the way that participants who ate burgers and fries did. The study concludes that it must be the fat in the food causing the immediate dangerous spike in blood pressure. It’s “food for thought” (sorry), but we’d be very curious to know if the researchers also measured blood sugar levels immediately following the meals. We’re willing to bet that both groups, but especially the low-fat group, saw a big blood sugar roller coaster after tucking into the 800+ calorie meals.

mcds

You all know we are seriously pro-fat around here. We don’t espouse the popular 90s trend of low-fat everything, generally because low-fat foods are often very high in sugar, which is devastating to health. Fat is good for you. We’re not saying fat needs to be your BFF*, but without natural fats in your diet, you’re at risk for stress, depression, anxiety, unhealthy skin, Alzheimer’s, improper nutrient absorption…well, it goes on and on! However, there’s a world of difference between natural, essential fats and processed, refined greasy fast food, as this study shows.

Trans Fat Trickery! (Why you should avoid processed foods, period.)

*Best Friend Forever

23 Apr

‘Seasoning’ Your Meals

April means the warmth of spring is upon us (well, any day now…). And that means new fruits and vegetables to enjoy! If you like to eat seasonally, be sure to check out this handy clickativity that provides a monthly guide to what’s in season. Though we can’t speak for cockles.

rosemary

This is Anethelna’s Flickr Photo

23 Apr

School of Athens

“Excess is oppressive.” – Aristotle

Usually on a Sunday night, I like to relax with a movie or a lightweight nonfiction read, but the Nicomachean Ethics stared out at me from the bookshelf last night. (Guaranteed way to a great night’s sleep: just start reading your old philosophy textbooks from college.)

The book fell open to a section on shame, excess and pleasure. I have long admired Aristotle’s views on shame, something many people secretly struggle with like so many weighted bags on the soul. Essentially (and philosophy experts please correct me – I’m a biology man) Aristotle argued that a virtuous, good person should never really feel shame. This gets to the big guy’s distinction between feelings and character. Aristotle felt that feelings were useful for children, who are ignorant and inexperienced, but adults are rational and ought to have sufficiently developed characters (doesn’t mean we repress our feelings; just that they are not always useful for growth). Shame is only a feeling, not a character trait. Your character is such that you would hopefully never do anything deserving of the feeling of shame, because you are steadfastly true to yourself. Shame comes from excess, which is really just dishonesty with yourself. This opens up a big can of philosophical worms, of course!

Then came the quote: “Excess is oppressive.” And it’s really true. I think many times, it is excess that burdens the soul with shame. This means things like exaggerating a story, boasting in hopes of attention, or being too self-deprecating and humble (for this too is a form of excess). In essence, these excesses are dishonest representations of your true self – and that is why they can become oppressive and collect like heavy sandbags of shame on the heart. But, as Aristotle said, we are adults, with no useful need for a feeling like shame. We ought to be sufficiently developed to guide our actions so they are in line with our characters.

Excess is a common way of life in Western culture. We are encouraged, through media, advertising and comparisons with others, to consume. Sometimes I think we’ve become a culture in pursuit of nothing more than “stuff”. When it comes to emotional, physical and mental health, I think part of what is so painful about being unwell in these areas is the underlying shame. That’s terribly unhealthy for a rational, virtuous adult, as I think most people are capable of being and work to be. I am not implying that any case of unwell is always one’s fault – there are all sorts of genetic and external factors that can affect your health, and may be out of your initial control. However, when it comes to issues like fitness, sleep, stress, weight and disease prevention, I think it’s important to avoid the trap of excess. Restaurants tempt us to overeat. There is always something more to do instead of exercise. Consumption breeds debt, which breeds stress and trouble sleeping peacefully. And so on.

Excess is painfully oppressive because it is so insidiously subtle. Excess is encouraged everywhere you look – in talk, in actions, in food, in material goods, in stimulation and entertainment. It not only harms our physical health; it harms the soul of the virtuous adult who seeks emotional health, wellness and balance. Excess tamps us down and oppresses. Simplicity and truthfulness with ourselves, on the other hand, set us free. I think good physical health and wellness cannot help but to follow.

23 Apr

Mi Blog Es Su Blog

This week’s challenge is a piece of cake, Apples. (Hmm. We’ve gotta get a better metaphor going than “cake”. What’s with the carb cliches? Cake, toast, bread. I can think of many things that are greater than sliced bread. But I digess.)

I challenge you to tell me what you’d like to see more of here at the blog. Fitness tips? Information about a particular supplement? Helpful information for a specific nutritional interest? We’re always searching the headlines and journals for the latest nutrition, health and wellness information you can benefit from. I get emails from dozens of you every day with excellent health questions and suggestions (my apologies if it takes me a few days to respond!). If you haven’t spoken up yet, and there’s a health issue you’d really like to see covered, I’d be happy to answer it. Just click on “Comments” below. You’ll be directed to sign in to the forum, where you can quickly and easily post your request. Getting to know my customers better, as well as hundreds of new friends from around the web, has been incredibly rewarding. I look forward to talking to you!

© 2014 Mark's Daily Apple