Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Mark's Daily Apple

4 Mar

More Chronic Cardio Talk

A few weeks back my Chronic Cardio post got a lot of response and initiated some great discussion. Since it’s one of the cornerstones of the Primal Blueprint philosophy (and an obviously popular one at that), I thought it was worth more time and tender loving attention.

And why wouldn’t anyone want to hear that real exercise doesn’t mean endless hours on that torturously boring treadmill? News like this is like sunlight bursting in, choirs of children singing, shackles collapsing open and crashing to the ground. Hordes of celebratory folk parade through the gym, penny whistles and fiddles playing, ale mugs in hand, goats and cows in the merry mix. Get off that treadmill and join us, for the love!

Keep reading…

4 Mar

Top 10 Reasons to Wriggle Out of a Workout

Sometimes you’ll do anything to get out of a workout. In fact, you’d rather spend 30 minutes making up a really good excuse; time that, if you think about it, you could have totally spent (begrudgingly of course) on a quick and simple workout.

So here at Mark’s Daily Apple we thought it was time to examine some of your best excuses:

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4 Mar

CDC Report Suggests Americans Get Too Little Sleep

A study released Thursday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that Americans are carving out too little time for sleep.

Published in the agency’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the study surveyed 19,589 adults living in Delaware, Hawaii, New York and Rhode Island about how many days in the prior month they had gotten insufficient rest or sleep. Researchers did not provide definitions to survey respondents about what was considered “sufficient” sleep and did not ask respondents to report how many hours they slept per night.

Among the respondents, 10% reported that they did not get enough rest or sleep every day in the past month, while 38% reported that they had not slept well seven or more days in the prior month.

Keep reading…

3 Mar

My Knee is Killing Me… No, Really.

One of the standard defenses uttered by those who desperately cling to the fast food and couch-potato lifestyle is, “why should I live like a hunter-gatherer? Their average lifespan was only 35 years.” Ipso fatso, if we clearly weren’t designed to live long, why make all those diet and exercise sacrifices?” This common faulty assumption that our hunter-gatherer ancestors lived “nasty, brutish and short” lives has always bugged me. Research suggests that Grok and his family were actually generally healthy (robust is the term), productive – and even so appreciative of their lives that they felt the need to express themselves through art. There are recent studies that suggest there may even have been a selective benefit within tribal units for grandparents – meaning that getting older may have actually had a selective benefit far past procreating. So, if they were so robust and if our genes truly evolved to allow us to live long lives, then why was the average lifespan relatively short? I had always assumed that it was things like deaths during childbirth, infections, accidental poisoning, even tribal warfare that brought the average lifespan down. But then I got a real-life experience of what might have affected the average more than anything else. And it’s really mundane, folks.

Keep reading…

3 Mar

Dear Mark: Vegetarian Protein Possibilities

In response to last week’s “Encore on Omegas” post, reader dunim asked this question about alternative protein sources:

Mark, how can an active person who doesn’t eat meat or fish and wants to eat minimum soy get good quality protein? Would you suggest whey supplements in case the protein requirements are not met? How much whey is too much?

As everyone and their grandmothers know, I strongly advise a meat and fish eating diet for the most complete nutrition. That said, I know that vegetarians won’t die of protein deprivation. However, they need to make more of a concerted effort to get the full “family” of amino acid building blocks. There are 22 amino acids that the human body uses to manufacture muscle and other vital tissue. Together, these 22 are essential for the body’s repair and regeneration needs. For vegetarians, getting enough of all 22 amino acids generally entails consuming more protein-containing carbohydrates and more calories to get the full amount of necessary protein.

Keep reading…

© 2015 Mark's Daily Apple

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