Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Mark's Daily Apple

4 Feb

You Double Dipped that Chip!!!

dipCast your mind back to Sunday, when you crowded around the television with your best buds to watch a great game of football. Now cast your mind back to the eating habits of your friends. Were there any double dippers in your crew? If so, you might be interested in a new study by Clemson University researchers that suggests that double dipping can transfer as much as 10,000 bacteria from the offending eaters mouth to the otherwise innocent dip (and, if you imbibe, your mouth!)

For the study, which will be published later this year in the Journal of Food Safety, researchers instructed nine student volunteers to take a bite of a cracker and then re-dip the remaining portion for three seconds into a tablespoon of test dip. Test dips included sterile water with three different degrees of acidity (appetizing, huh?), a commercial salsa, a cheese dip, and chocolate syrup. The students were instructed to repeat the process with new crackers until they had conducted either three or six double dips per dip sample.

Keep reading…

1 Feb

Sisson’s Super Bowl Tips: Take 2

For the 22 players on the field this Sunday, the Super Bowl represents a time to showcase their strength, power, endurance, and – perhaps most importantly – will to win. It’s a chance to be the best, to score 365 days-worth of bragging rights, and to become the owner of a much-coveted Super Bowl ring (although at this point, I think it’s best to politely ignore the fact that they’re fighting for a splashy piece of jewelry!)

For the rest of us, Super Bowl Sunday is really not much more than an excuse to laze around on the couch and gorge on chips, dip, sub-par pizza and an endless supply of beer!

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1 Feb

Can the Super Bowl make you Super Sick?

footballA study published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that settling down to watch this weekend’s Super Bowl could be harmful to your health!

For the study, researchers from the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany recorded the number of heart attacks, cardiac arrests and other acute cardiac events reported in the greater Munich region when the nation’s soccer team played in the 2006 World Cup series.

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1 Feb

Big Pharma: Bad Science AND Bad Business

bitterAs promised, we’ve been hot on the trail of Big Pharma lately, passing along every bit of damning truth we can find. This Sunday’s LATimes carried an article we call an “essential read” for anyone who’s been following and cursing the industry’s exploitation of the American public.

The strategy that has made the pharmaceutical industry one of the wealthiest and most powerful on Earth is finally starting to betray it. Beginning in just a few weeks, and continuing over the next several years, some of the biggest-selling and most profitable drugs in history will lose their patent protection. …The real problem is that the industry’s scientists have hit a dry spell. They are not discovering enough new drugs to replace the aging standbys. Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved just 19 new medicines, according to preliminary data, the fewest since 1983. Lost in all the hand-wringing on Wall Street is a recognition of how the industry got itself into this fix in the first place. For 25 years, the drug industry has imitated the basic business model of Hollywood. Pharmaceutical executives, like movie moguls, have focused on creating blockbusters. …The strategy had a flaw that executives have long ignored: It required extraordinary amounts of promotion at the expense of scientific creativity. To make the strategy work, the drug industry put its marketers in charge; scientists were given a back seat. Is it any wonder that executives at many companies have watched their pipelines of new drugs slow to a trickle?

via LA Times

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31 Jan

The Role of Lean Muscle Mass and Organ Reserve in Aging

strongThere’s been a lot in the news lately about the question of longevity. This past week an article discussed the role of exercise in “biological aging,” the relative age of a person based on biomarkers (determined by telomere length in this study), rather than simple chronology.

To add to this discussion, I want to offer up a medically accepted dimension of biological aging that hasn’t gotten as much press lately. Lean muscle mass in happy tandem with organ reserve are two defining characteristics of both good health and longevity.

Have you ever heard someone say that a person died of “old age” or “natural causes”? Essentially, the person died as a result of the logical end of the aging process, the diminishment of organ reserve and corresponding muscle mass that supported his/her physical functioning.

Keep reading…

© 2014 Mark's Daily Apple

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