Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Mark's Daily Apple

20 Apr

Weekend Link Love

weekend link love2I am about halfway through the writing of Primal Endurance, a breakthrough book that will change the way we look at endurance training and competition. The main emphasis is on low-carb and/or ketogenic diets and training strategies. I am looking for Success Stories that exemplify this approach. If you compete in any event and have had success training and racing on a low-carb or ketogenic diet, I would love to hear details and maybe even feature your story in the book. Please submit your story here. Thanks!

Episode #15 of The Primal Blueprint Podcast is now live. It’s another great reader question roundup.

A new Paleo documentary – “We Love Paleo” – is in production. Donate to the cause and see the important message disseminated.

Keep reading…

19 Apr

Grilled Broccoli and Shrimp Salad

GrilledSalad2After grilling broccoli once, you’re going to wonder why you’ve never thought of cooking it this way before. Charred and crispy around the edges, tender with just a little bit of crunch, grilling brings out the best in broccoli. Toss grilled broccoli in a big bowl with lime and chili grilled shrimp and you’ve got one amazing salad.

Grilled broccoli doesn’t taste all that much different than broccoli roasted in a high-heat oven, but it cooks faster. The bright green color and a bit of crunch remain intact. Plus, who wants to crank the oven to 450 ºF in the summer?

Keep reading…

18 Apr

Failure Isn’t a Setback, It’s a Catalyst for Change

It’s Friday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. I’ll continue to publish these each Friday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading!

real life stories stories 1 2Growing up in Orange County I was always active. As a kid I was always at the beach, on my bike, or on my skateboard. Summers I’d be outdoors from sunup to sundown and usually hot and sweaty from all the activity. My family didn’t have a lot of money so unlike a lot of my peers I grew up without an Atari, Nintendo, Sega, or Gameboy. When we went on drives, I actually looked out the windows and observed the world around me. I was always tan and can’t remember ever being overweight. In high school I ran cross country and track. I didn’t set any records, but I was always in the top percentages. I ran Mt. SAC all four years of high school and I remember my senior year it was raining so bad that it was shoe-sucking-mud the entire 5K. Add a few obstacles into the equation and you had the equivalent of a Marine Corps Mud Run. There were no records set that day by anyone, but I did manage to finish the race first, only because I had spent the previous 3 months running sand dunes. I thoroughly enjoyed the outdoors. All through high school and until I was about 23 I’d hike Big Bear and Lake Arrowhead and the famous Bridge to Nowhere outside of Asuza. I was either hiking or backpacking at least one weekend a month for many, many years.

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17 Apr

You Are What You (Think You) Eat

eatLast week’s post on marketing took me in an interesting turn this week. I stumbled on an article on NPR highlighting a past but very provocative study that I’ve been toying with for a couple of days now. Having spent years researching the placebo effect, Alia Crum, a clinical psychologist and researcher for Columbia Business School, was intrigued by the possibility that food could also be subject to certain physical placebo-generated outcomes. She wondered if our beliefs about a food or drink could influence the effects it physically elicited in us. After all, if what we believed about a sugar pill could make a measurable difference in our physiological functioning, why would a food product be any different? And on that note, weren’t we all being constantly fed (pardon the pun) elaborate messages about the food we bought? Did the variety of labels and claims somehow weave themselves in our mental fabric enough to not only impact our consumer behavior but maybe our body’s responses themselves?

Keep reading…

16 Apr

4 Foods That Have Surprising Medicinal Benefits

bittermelon“Let food be thy medicine,” said some old Roman guy, I think. Whoever he was, he was right. Food is the foundation for preventive medicine. It’s the first thing we examine when figuring out a health issue, and successful changes to what we eat usually have the most profound effect on our health. If we don’t eat well, we won’t be healthy – simple as that.

But what if food literally was medicine? What if certain foods had specific, established pharmacological effects that rivaled certain pharmaceuticals?

Keep reading…

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