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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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January 23, 2008

Lap Bands and Type 2 Diabetes

By Mark Sisson
28 Comments

While caution is required in interpreting the longer-term benefits of surgery and weight loss, this study presents strong evidence to support the early consideration of surgically induced loss of weight in the treatment of obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

via Science Daily

I have to comment on this recent study that confirms, albeit circuitously, what we have said here for years: type 2 diabetes can be cured. In this case, the so-called medical solution falls under my Rube Goldberg term “Digging a hole to put the ladder in to wash the basement windows.” In this study we see that portion control – when rigorously enforced using risky lap-banding surgery – actually improves insulin sensitivity and, hence, returns blood sugar to more normal levels. Duh. And don’t you love this quote: “Type 2 diabetes is a disease that should aggressively be treated with surgery and not merely controlled with medications.”? Wow.

I have said for years that type 2 diabetes is both preventable and curable in 99% of cases. It’s a matter of appropriate exercise choices, portion control and the right mix of protein and healthy fats. Cutting sugars and simple carbs is critical to the process. It doesn’t require risky surgical procedures. Watch those people on “Biggest Loser.” No matter who they are, they ALL lose weight in a matter of weeks and they all experience big improvement in blood glucose metabolism. And they’re not even cutting the carbs as much as I would have them do!

This video is from last night’s broadcast of NBC Nightly News. Watch the whole thing if you would like but pay special attention to the quote at the 1:40 mark in the video. I am almost speechless.

On a related note:

High-risk morbidly obese patients who lose 5 to 10 percent of their excess body weight before undergoing gastric bypass surgery appear to have shorter hospital stays and more rapid postoperative weight loss, according to a report in the October issue of Archives of Surgery, a theme issue on bariatric surgery.

via Science Daily

People who undergo bariatric surgery are encouraged to lose 10% of their body weight before the surgery to improve their recovery! If they can lose 10% of their weight themselves in time for the weight-loss surgery, why are they having the surgery at all?

Hit me up with a comment!

Photo Source

Further Reading:

The Definitive Guide to Insulin, Blood Sugar & Type 2 Diabetes

Jimmy Moore: Woman Chooses Low-Carb Over Lap Band

My Carb Pyramid

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28 Comments on "Lap Bands and Type 2 Diabetes"

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Migraineur
8 years 8 months ago
I agree with much of what you’re saying here, but I think a blanket statement like “Type II diabetes is curable” is a little bit inaccurate. Whether it is curable or not depends in part on how much damage has been done to the pancreatic beta cells, which are responsible for producing insulin. If these cells are only beginning to quit, yes, I think Type II diabetes is probably curable. Or at least, it is possible to control it so tightly that it is as if one is cured. This would imply that early detection is key. However, according to… Read more »
Brian A
Brian A
8 years 8 months ago
Oh my God! Dr. George should be prosecuted for that comment and lose his license! What’s he do for a living, bariatric surgery? At least check his real estate investment portfolio, I’m sure a surgery center is in there somewhere. Before this, he was probably prescribing fen-phen. When doctors as a group become healthier than I am, or even if I find a single MD who is healthier than I am, I will listen to what they have to say. Was it Jack LaLanne who dropped out of medical school because he found it to be a load of crap… Read more »
Oxybeles
Oxybeles
8 years 8 months ago

Is this bariatric or barbaric surgery?

I believe a chnage to a Primal or Evolutionary Diet would be the better alternative.

I only can see what has happened to me without surgery.

Donna
Donna
8 years 8 months ago

When it comes down to “weight loss” i don’t believe in quick fixes. I believe that anyone CAN lose their desired weight if they just exercise and eat the right things. If they “believe” they CAN lose 10% of their body weight, why can’t they “believe” they CAN lose “ALL” their desired weight!!! I also believe that it’s wisdom if you want to lose weight to do it slowly which is the healthier way to do it. (Just my 2 cents)

Laurie
Laurie
4 years 7 months ago

Surgery is efficient yes, but not a fix. It takes a lot of hard work and dedication to lose it as well as keep it off. Some people feel overwhelmed with such high amounts to lose. Please try not to judge.

LabRat
8 years 8 months ago
Of the few people I actually have any knowledge of (in this case brother of a friend) who had bariatric surgery, he ate himself back up to his pre-surgery weight even with the limitation… which meant eating until he puked, then eating again, and basically eating around the clock. That doesn’t say lack of education or lousy Western diet to me. That says deep psychological issue. I wouldn’t be surprised if many of the people desperate enough to undergo the pain and inconvenience suffer from a similar problem- they’re looking for a way to stop themselves, not a quick fix… Read more »
Laurie
Laurie
4 years 7 months ago

What you don’t have, is a comparison of people who had the surgery and DIDN’T gain it back. We are the ones that you encounter on the street or at the gym, of a normal size, who you had no clue had surgery.

Also, the type of surgery makes a big difference. Lap band has a much lower success rate than gastric bypass. And yes, if friends brother wasn’t compliant with the program, he’d gain. Thats why its only a tool, not a cure

Mark Sisson
8 years 8 months ago
Migraineur, I understand your concerns here about my blanket statement. I’ve made it many times before, because I hear so many docs say “once a diabetic, always a diabetic.” They are so wrong. Type 2 is really a lifestyle condition defined by blood numbers (fasting glucose, A1C, insulin, etc) and brought on by bad diet and lack of exercise. One day you’re not a diabetic – the next day you are. It’s all about the numbers according to the medical industry. But the truth is, we all are pre-diabetic and we all live on a continuum of numbers based on… Read more »
Kevin
Kevin
3 years 10 months ago
Mark, As a former type II diabetic, I absolutely agree. It is curable for 99% and to refine your blanket statement, let’s stipulate that if you’re fasting glucose is less than 200 then it’s 100%. Mine was in the 110-120 range. After a while I was prescribed Metformin. It worked to control sugar via increased glucose tolerance. Eating was the problem, as I already exercised and lifted weights jumped rope, surfed, SUP, etc. However I noticed that if I just jumped rope for 4 minutes Tabata style or did 50 body weight squats after eating my blood sugar would get… Read more »
Cindy Moore
8 years 8 months ago

I’d like to see a comparison of people following a low carb or paleo diet vs those having surgery.

MK Stover
8 years 8 months ago
I’m appalled that surgery is about to become the instant ‘fix’ for diabetes. However, I’m not surprised. With the wealth of misinformation available for diabetics, it’s really no wonder that the cure rate for the diet and exercise group is as low as 13%. I wonder how that would compare to a ‘caveman’ type diet, even taking into consideration noncompliance (which would be comparable to the study that uses the currently approved diabetic diet)? Mark, I agree that most cases of Type 2 diabetes would be curable given the right information; I’m not sure the rate is as high as… Read more »
Dr. J
Dr. J
8 years 8 months ago

“if I find a single MD who is healthier than I am, I will listen to what they have to say.”
Start paying attention, Brian A

http://calorielab.com/news/categories/dr-j-will-see-you-now/

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Vasyu
8 years 1 month ago

uUnfjZ Vasyu testit vasyu.net

Fixed Gear
7 years 4 months ago
Half the people getting the surgery are gluttonous fat slobs, who eat for taste rather than health. Nothing you can really do for them; they will ALWAYS make the wrong choice. But the other half I really feel for. Because they are TRYING to do the right thing, but they are being LIED to!! Look at the ADA recommendations. Look at all the carbs they TELL DIABETICS TO KEEP EATING! It’s unreal. People TRUST something called the “American Diabetes Association” and think they have their best interest in mind but they don’t. And those same sheep will think lap band… Read more »
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Alexandra
Alexandra
7 years 1 month ago

I had lapband surgery in march 2006. I was basically a “healthy” overweight person – but I believe I was with suffering Syndrome X type problems. My blood sugars were so screwed up that it got to the point where it really didn’t seem to matter what I ate – my body was messed up – thanks for the “fat gluttonous slob” comment there Fixed Gear! :-/

Alexandra
Alexandra
7 years 1 month ago
(oops posted before I’d finished!) Once I had the surgery, such is the nature of the beast – very little went down. I had experimented with low-carb diets in the past and they had worked for me – to a degree. The gastric band meant that I lived for 2 years on around 500 calories a day. I did lose weight – but I was far from healthy. Last summer I had the band loosened because I was lucky enough to have had the psychological counselling needed to fix myself – nobody gets “that fat” in the first place without… Read more »
Fixed gear
7 years 1 month ago
“My blood sugars were so screwed up that it got to the point where it really didn’t seem to matter what I ate.” Uhhhh. Yes it DOES matter. I bet you never tried a low carb, high veggie, moderate fat primal diet and REALLY stuck to it. Had you done that with 100% compliance for a week your blood sugar would even out like mine has. I was a 200 pound pre-diabetic “fat gluttonous slob” myself. After going primal for 6 months I’m 171 and stronger. With virtually NO cardio. It really IS all diet. Keep reading; buy Mark’s book.… Read more »
Alexandra
Alexandra
7 years 30 days ago

I am not looking to argue with you “Fixed Gear”. As I explained in my post there were deep underlying issues and I also used a low-carb method, not a “no-carb” method. Perhaps you can read my post again. I’m sorry you felt you were a glutinous slob – that’s not a very nice way to view yourself. 🙂

Laurie
Laurie
4 years 7 months ago
Wow, I know this post is over three years old, but I just can’t help but respond!! First of all, those who claimed that people who had weight loss surgery are lazy slobs- wow, judge a little? The nasty things I could reply back would not make me a better person, so I will refrain. Full disclosure, I had gastric bypass on 10/25/10. I am a 5’11” female who weighed 330lbs at my highest. I was a former athlete who usually weighed around 180-200lbs. I am now down to 200lbs, and am so grateful for the surgery. I too, was… Read more »
Kat
Kat
4 years 7 months ago
Thanks for the thoughtful post, Laurie. I’m currently in my 6month pre-surgery weight loss period, going Primal and seeing if I still want to go through with it after 6 months of feeling healthier. Like you said, the post surgery diet is fairly primal, though the intolerance for fats is definitely a concern. The surgery is really a compliance tool, and having just had a majorly noncompliant dinner last night while on vacation, the idea of it simply not being possible is a good one. If I can stick to it with few excursions, I hope to not feel the… Read more »
Terri
Terri
4 years 1 month ago
From someone who has tried all of the above, including changing lifestyle choices, low carb, paleo, HCG, etc. etc. and has succeeded in maintaining a non-obese weight as a result, with a lot of continued daily hard work, please don’t judge! Surgery is not the “easy out” you characterize it as. It involves losing 10% first, then the risk of surgery, then eating only liquids for a month. Anyone who is at the point where they’re willing to do that has most likely tried a lot of other less-invasive ways first without success. They have also most likely already worked… Read more »
dana pallessen
dana pallessen
3 years 11 months ago
i just found out my sister has diabetes, parkinson disease and weighs 233 pounds. she just told me she was thinking of try the lap band. i have turned her on to this website, gnolls.org and to keep strack and do some research livestrong.com. i told her to use her self-discipline, perserverance, will and eating like this webswite indicates to regain her health. she was a jock in school. i live on the other side of the country and have since 1972. my visual image of her is 5’10” 125 , not 5’10” and 233. i was heavy at puberty… Read more »
dana pallessen
dana pallessen
3 years 11 months ago

i miswrote, she weighs 333, not 233. no time like the present to regain her health.

Dawby
Dawby
3 years 10 months ago
Hi all I am a female, 5’6″ turning 70 yrs of age, Dec 2012. As a child I was normal size and was a gymnast and a “jockette”. Had a brief weight problem at age 16, where I went from 110-115 lbs to 172+ lbs. within about half a year, because I started eating everything in sight, and in large quantities, while stopping sportsand exercise except for long walks. At that time,I went on a “Water Fast” and lost tall of the excess weight, and my eating habits became normal again after that for many decades to come. I never… Read more »
shrimp4me
shrimp4me
3 years 4 months ago
Bariatric surgery does not cure the desire to overstuff w/food—I bought a lap band for my (now estranged) husband in Apr of 2007 who was 6’2” and weighed as much as 500 lbs because frankly he was dying from his own gluttony. He followed his program quite well for about 18 mos and lost almost 200 lbs, especially when his band was tightened down. However, he started to have problems including stomach bleeding so after he had his band loosened up again the stuffing resumed. As of Feb 2013 he is back up to 380 lbs even after having had… Read more »
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