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Dear Mark: I Hate to Exercise

Posted By Mark Sisson On May 28, 2012 @ 8:00 am In Dear Mark,Fitness | 184 Comments

Many of us enjoy exercise, probably more just tolerate it, but have you ever known someone to detest it with every fiber of their being? Today, we have a question from a reader with precisely that issue. She hates exercise, and even feels near to tears when she has to do it. Moreover, she doesn’t get the “high [7]” that many of us – even the ones who would rather be doing something else – enjoy after a workout. Well, she’s not alone. Regular exercise is a major stumbling block [8] for many of us, so let’s take a look at some general strategies those that hate exercise can employ, as well as new ways to think about and approach exercise. I don’t have any end all, be all answers, but I do have some good ideas. First, the question:

I think I saw this concern addressed on your blog, but I am not sure. I hate to exercise. There is something in me that just makes me want to cry when I have to do it. I never feel good after I do it. What is the answer? Desperately wanting to exercise, but just can’t.

Thanks,

Mary

Unfortunately, there is no easy answer. There is no one supplement [9] to take. There’s no one exercise that works for everyone, everywhere, under any circumstance. That you’re “desperately wanting to exercise,” however, is a good start. Here are my suggestions for getting started and making it stick. Oh, and – most importantly – enjoying it!

Get a Workout Partner

More importantly than just finding someone who will workout with you, make a series of pacts with your buddy. First, if one person doesn’t show or backs out, the other person must also back out. Second, pledge to keep training until the other person stops. Research suggests [10] that if someone else’s workout depends on yours, you will be more likely to exercise, so as not to disappoint or let down the other person. Drill sergeants have been doing essentially this for millennia – making the group suffer for the mistake of one in order to compel the one to shape up.

Tinker with Your Neural Reward System

Normally, the release of dopamine makes us feel good about completing a goal. That goal could be finishing a tough work assignment, winning a game of chess, or completing a hard workout. And the dopamine release, if it happens reliably enough, also helps us form (good and bad) habits [11]. Is there something you love and enjoy every time you experience or obtain it? Maybe it’s an episode of your favorite TV show. Maybe it’s a long hot bath. Whatever it is, indulge yourself with a healthy reward every single time you work out. If you’ve ever trained a dog [12] to do anything, this will be familiar. You might even feel a little silly, but don’t. We’re all animals [13], and we all respond to reward in similar ways. It’s just that some of us have already learned to associate exercise with neural reward. You probably haven’t, so you need to do a bit of formal entrainment [14]. Eventually, you won’t need the reward anymore. Like a good dog no longer needs a treat in order to sit, stay, or come, you’ll come to associate exercise with its own inherent reward – especially after seeing the results.

Make Your Short Workouts Shorter and More Intense

I say this a lot, and for good reason: acute bouts of ultra-intense training is more effective and, unsurprisingly, more neurally rewarding [15]. What does this mean, in real world terms? Increase the intensity and reduce the volume. Lift more weight [16], not more reps. Run (or bike, or crawl, or swim) as fast as you can for a short period of time, not pretty fast for a long period of time.

Just Move and Play

You say you hate “exercise.” That’s fine; lots of people hate it. But what about movement in general? Is there any physical activity you can bear? Walking? Gardening? Hiking? Rock climbing? Playing catch? Frisbee? I refuse to believe that any and all types of physical undertaking make you miserable. If you can find the will to get up out of bed and walk to the kitchen for breakfast in the morning without crying, you can walk a little farther – say, around the block several times – as well. Don’t worry about calories or reps or weight or the next guy. Just move and play.

Relearn the Meaning of Exercise

While I’ve always been active, there was a time when I hated – truly hated – what I considered to be the optimal form of exercise. Back when I was an endurance athlete, running marathons and then competing in triathlons, I began to hate my training. I was fit and active and thought I was doing the best thing I could for my body, but I really dreaded working out. Eventually, I realized that not only was my training unpleasant and miserable, it was also extremely unhealthy. That revelation forced me to relearn the meaning of exercise. I had to move, I had to train somehow, but I couldn’t continue on my current trajectory. I had to start all over and accept that maybe, just maybe it would be okay to take it easy and lift some weights, move really fast for short periods of time, and take actual rest days. Once I accepted that exercise didn’t have to miserable to be effective, everything fell into place.

Examine Your Past

Your disdain for exercise may be long-held and deep-seated. Perhaps your gym classes as a kid were particularly brutal and unforgiving, and you just learned to associate exercise with misery. I felt that way, early on in my school career. But amidst all the wedgies and purple nurples and teasing, I learned to love exercise by finding something I loved to do (and something I was already doing on my own as a kid): running. Ironically, I hate running distance nowadays, but my love for movement in general has never waned. Look back to and face down a precipitating event – if one indeed exists. Identifying it may be enough to start the road to recovery.

Try Different Modalities

Some need more regimentation, direction, and structure to their exercise. Some need more freedom, randomization, and boundlessness. Many people do better at the gym and laze around at home; others never quite get over their self-consciousness and instead prefer working out solitarily, whether that’s in the garage or at a secluded spot in the park. I’m a big fan of both slow-moving high intensity training, a la Body By Science [17], as well as something as seemingly intuitive but sneakily periodized and systematic as MovNat [18]. If you dislike training and want it to be over with as quickly as possible while remaining effective, try Body by Science, explained here in a guest post [19] by Dr. Doug McGuff (its creator). If you hate training but want to love it, try a MovNat 1-day class [20] (described here [21] by a Worker Bee who attended one). I challenge you to try MovNat and not want to move often and move well.

This will sound cliche, but you need to broaden your horizons. You may end up hating each and every one of the workout modalities you try, but you cannot know that until you actually try one. Good luck! And remember, you just have to move!

Feel free, folks, to chime in with whatever worked for you. Specific movements, training regimens, strategies, different ways to think about exercise, that sort of thing. Oftentimes the best stuff comes up in the comment section, and I hope this time is no different!


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[7] high: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/dear-mark-matcha-tea-runners-high-stress-and-weight-gain-and-fasting-for-teens/

[8] stumbling block: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-to-deal-with-common-primal-stumbling-blocks/

[9] supplement: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/definitive-guide-to-primal-supplementation/

[10] Research suggests: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22576339

[11] helps us form (good and bad) habits: http://www.cell.com/neuron/abstract/S0896-6273(11)00931-7

[12] dog: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/dogs-teach-tricks-too/#axzz1w5jA1Y2V

[13] animals: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-human-animal-connection/

[14] entrainment: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/circadian-rhythms-zeitgebers-entrainment-and-non-photic-stimuli/

[15] more neurally rewarding: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22029953

[16] Lift more weight: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/strength-training-women/#axzz1w5jYwKnM

[17] Body By Science: http://www.bodybyscience.net/home.html/

[18] MovNat: http://movnat.com/

[19] here in a guest post: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/setting-yourself-up-to-win-a-body-by-science-approach/#axzz1vwXHp9WZ

[20] MovNat 1-day class: http://movnat.com/train-with-us/1-day-2-day-workshops-overview/north-american-schedule-booking/

[21] described here: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/movnat-review/#axzz1vwYV0mhR

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