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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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March 31, 2010

How Much Is Too Much?

By Mark Sisson
242 Comments

Although the Primal Blueprint leaves ample room for individual determination, I do try to offer folks a clear picture of the impact different dietary and lifestyle choices have on their overall health picture. At times I even offer specific recommendations or ranges that readers can tailor to their particular needs and situations. I’m often asked, however, about the upper ceilings I would set for various elements of the PB (fat, fish oil, etc.) I thought I’d take on those questions today and cover good ground by applying a rapid fire approach for several of the most common “excess” inquiries. Enjoy, and be sure to share your thoughts!

Protein

My general recommendation is one gram per pound of lean body mass on an average day. If you IF, it might weigh in at half that or less on your fasting days, whereas special occasions like Thanksgiving or your uncle’s annual steak fry might tip the intake scale at 1.5 grams per pound or so of lean mass. For the average active person, these amounts will be well utilized and fully sufficient. Any more than that, however, and you run the risk of excess protein being converted to glucose, which of course defeats the purpose of a low/lower carb diet. If you’re adequately hydrated (which doesn’t take much), eating an overall alkaline diet and ensuring adequate intake of bone supportive nutrients like magnesium, calcium and vitamins D and K, the common (but generally outdated) concerns about kidney load and osteoporosis aren’t significant issues.

Fat

Eating Primally will almost always mean that more than half of your calories will come from fat, and there’s no reason to be concerned about that – in fact it’s a reason to rejoice. Our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate at least that and, in some cases, considerably more. There isn’t really an upper limit for fat intake. For the vast majority of us, a useful way to approach the fat question is to first dial in your protein intake and then look at what carb intake you’re shooting for. (Check out the Primal Blueprint Carb Curve for a good summary of ranges.) You could potentially go zero carb – although the prospect is extremely impractical (and boring) for most people and must be well thought out and rather meticulously executed. After accounting for adequate protein and desired Primal carbs, you can fill out the rest of your caloric needs with fat, prioritizing the cleanest saturated fats you have financial and logistical access to, then monounsaturated fats and then healthy, intact polyunsaturated fats like certain nuts and fish oils.

Conveniently, that brings me to our next category in question….

Fish Oil

I generally recommend 1-3 grams of fish oil each day to counter inflammation and balance out dietary omega-6 content toward a healthier ratio approaching 1:1. The more Primal and clean you’re eating, the less you need. As for upper limits, it depends. More than three grams a day on an otherwise healthy diet (and/or in conjunction with certain medications/high alcohol intake) can thin your blood too much and impair its necessary clotting ability. Keep in mind not everyone is affected equally by a higher dose. Some people do fine with higher amounts. Other people notice excess thinning at well below three grams. For people with certain medical conditions, dosages above three grams have served as effective therapeutic treatment options. Of course, just because a certain dosage has been used in scientific studies doesn’t mean it’s necessary or advisable to take that much if you have a given condition. Talk to your doctor, and keep in mind that quality fish oil isn’t the cheapest thing in the world. One-three grams is nothing to sneeze at. It’s potent stuff. There’s no use taking more than you’ll fully benefit from. Better to take an adequate dose and spend the extra money on better quality food than to down megadoses of fish oil you don’t need.

Chocolate

I don’t want to rain too much on anyone’s parade here, chocolate lovers being a uniquely passionate lot. Nonetheless, I’ll be straight with you. First, there’s the obvious: carb content. (Check the sugar and total carb content on your respective package and decide how it will figure into your Primal plan.) Those of us who have a penchant for the highest cocoa contents (or even the raw nibs) have a longer leash so to speak. Less sugar equals fewer carbs equals more chance to enjoy more chocolate. Yes? Well, yes, but there’s a little more to the story. One small study found that cocoa powder elicited more insulin release than other flavorings – irrespective of the macronutrient breakdown of the food. Researchers didn’t know what to make of the results, but postulated that the Pavlovian principle may be at work here. (I’m seriously not making this up.) The more we love our chocolate, the more our bodies evidently betray us. Although it’s hardly enough to get me to forgo a good piece of chocolate, it does underscore the need for personally instituted moderation.

Bacon

There’s no such thing as too much bacon.

Butter

Ditto.

Fruit

The above principle applies here as well. Fruit can play a healthy role in the PB, but too much can backfire. This is one area to watch – especially if you’re trying to lose weight. Tailor your fruit intake to your desired Primal carb intake. As luck would have it, higher ORAC level fruits also tend to be lower on the glycemic scale. Berries and cherries generally offer the most antioxidant bang with the least carb buck. Check out this carb chart (PDF) for useful carbohydrate estimates on all your favorites.

Alcohol

I say none is best. However, research generally supports the health benefits of 1-2 drinks a day (1 for the average woman and 2 for the average man). More than that, and the benefits begin to plummet pretty quickly. Certain alcohols can be reasonable Primal indulgences, and some like red wine can offer unique and potentially therapeutic health benefits. That said, moderation is key. That extra indulgent Saturday night at your cousin’s wedding won’t do much harm beyond that splitting headache the next day, but making a habit of it won’t do you any favors. (Think impaired brain and liver functioning.)

Sleep

The Definitive Guide last week got people talking about the suggested ceiling for sleep. A number of studies connect several downsides, including higher obesity and diabetes risk, to longer sleep duration (9-10 hours or more). The consensus seems to support the average of 7-8 hours a night as optimal. However, people have legitimate differences in sleep need. The vast majority of folks probably fall into the average need range, but there are always outliers. If you keep a healthy lifestyle and a genuinely good sleep schedule, but have to drag yourself through the day with less than nine hours of shut eye, you’re likely in this group. I think the key here is quality over quantity. Remember that college roommate who slept through his classes until noon or later? He was likely up well past midnight (doing who knows what). When you miss out on those early hours of deep sleep, it’s tempting for the body to stay in bed and try to make up for the deficiency. If you’re healthy and consistently in tune with your circadian rhythm, you’re likely in tune with what your body really needs.

Thanks for reading, and let me know what you think. What are your upper limits for the above – and other – Primal matters? What logic and experiences tell you how much is too much?

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242 Comments on "How Much Is Too Much?"

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Eric
6 years 5 months ago

“There’s no such thing as too much bacon.”

I love this quote.

Lillian
Lillian
6 years 5 months ago

ditto 🙂

Clay
6 years 5 months ago
Perfect timing for this “too much” subject. I was just having an internal argument with myself over having extra bacon with my morning omelette. While still not letting the calories run wild, the extra bacon seems to prolong my energy further throughout the day. Glad to hear, more bacon can be OK. As for chocolate, my 85% plus (especially Godiva %85) keeps me on track with just 2 small pieces almost daily. Maybe it is the psychological benefit or the “mood chemicals” in the chocolate that help. Sleep – I bet we could all get a bit more to get… Read more »
Mike
Mike
6 years 5 months ago

Hey careful on the Yogurt, most still have plenty of carbs and even the ‘plain’ yogurt sometimes will have sugars added. Look for ‘Icelandic’ style. It’s super thick, but only six carbs, no added sugars, and SEVENTEEN grams of protien!

Frank
Frank
6 years 5 months ago

Down from 244 to 212 as of Jan. 2010. Keep it up man, I love this stuff.

Angelina
Angelina
6 years 5 months ago

Yes, me too. I have bacon every day as well. I am glad to hear that I do not need to cut back 🙂

mAnton
mAnton
3 years 7 months ago

i believe the bacon and butter amount was sarcasm. Use common sense.

gwen
gwen
6 years 5 months ago

try putting frozen berries in a small amount of coconut milk..awesome

fixed gear
6 years 5 months ago

Me too! …but there is such thing as too much sodium nitrates, so be careful… A bacon-heavy meal on an empty stomach first thing in the morning could potentially make you very ill. …not the pork, the nitrates they cure it with. Nitrate free? Then carry on!

Ashley Mason
5 years 11 months ago
Nitrate free bacon is actually WORSE than cured bacon. Cook’s Illustrated paid for the test: Nitrite has long been a controversial food additive, with studies showing it forms carcinogenic compounds called nitrosamines when heated in the presence of proteins, like those in bacon. Regular bacon is cured with nitrite (NO?) or a virtually identical chemical, nitrate (NO?), both of which act as preservatives, though only nitrite has the potential to form potentially harmful nitrosamines. Bacon labeled “nitrate- or nitrite-free,” on the other hand, is brined with salt, a bacterial lactic acid starter culture, and celery juice (sometimes listed as “natural… Read more »
Ez
Ez
4 years 2 months ago

Thanks for the info, Ashley.
Funny that few are commenting on this important information about bacon and marketing phrases.

mgarrett
mgarrett
3 years 4 months ago

Mark has actually written about the nitrates and nitrites in bacon. He didn’t say uncured was worse, but he did say that buying one or the other doesn’t make a significant difference unless you care about the taste. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/a-quick-guide-to-bacon/#axzz2T2SMD0mM

Personally, I don’t think the potential gain in flavor would be worth doubling my bacon costs, and with your mini-study now… I’m definitely sticking to my regularly cured bacon.

shepherd
6 years 5 months ago

Double ditto. And was hoping this was the answer! Yay Bacon!

Steve
6 years 5 months ago

Ditto!!! LOL! U da man! 🙂

CJ
CJ
6 years 5 months ago

“Bacon: There’s no such thing as too much bacon.”

Can I get that on a T-shirt please?

Kat
6 years 5 months ago

T Shirt- Bacon on the front, butter on the back? I’d buy it

piano-doctor-lady
piano-doctor-lady
6 years 5 months ago

Butter on the front, side pork on the back

Kat
6 years 5 months ago

butter on the front
side pork on the side
back bacon on the back
All around awesome tshirt

(Please make them available in x-small?)

Joy
Joy
6 years 5 months ago

Yes me too please, that would b a great t- shirt:))
Loved this Article.. Thanks Mark

Todd
6 years 5 months ago

Mark,

We all want a “There’s no such thing as too much bacon” t-shirt. So, make one!

DThalman
DThalman
6 years 5 months ago

yes please

Lee Edwards
Lee Edwards
6 years 5 months ago

I want 2!

MsNetMonster
MsNetMonster
6 years 5 months ago

“There’s no such thing as too much bacon.”

I love you for this.

Kev
Kev
6 years 5 months ago

Bacon, it is not just for breakfast anymore. Think I’ll cook some for Dinner.

Aaron Curl
6 years 5 months ago

GOT BACON? lots of great t-shirt ideas. Great article as always Mark.

skeedaddy
skeedaddy
5 years 2 months ago

Primal shopping….”I need to run to the store for some more bacon!”

Organic Gabe
6 years 5 months ago

Long live the Fat 🙂

Nicole
Nicole
4 years 2 months ago

Such a short phrase, but it made me laugh. There is such joy behind those words….thank you!

Ryan
Ryan
6 years 5 months ago

In regards to sleep, Lights Out: Sleep Sugar and Survival recommends 9.5 hrs a night for 7 months of the year (fall/winter) as that is what our ancestors did up until 70 yrs ago when the lightbulb came into widespread use. Any thoughts on this? Also, won’t the fat in most bacon be high in omega 6 thus we want to limit intake somewhat? Thanks and love the website/book

Gina Worley
Gina Worley
6 years 5 months ago

Ha! The bacon line was my FAVE too! Everything tastes better with a little bacon.

AJ
6 years 5 months ago

Awesome article! I’m a chocolate lover myself so that’s hard to swallow. 🙂 The 80/20 rule would also be helpful here:

http://www.nutritionize.net/2009/09/the-8020-rule.html

KestrelSF
6 years 5 months ago

“You have to have had too much to know how much enough is”

Kristin J
Kristin J
6 years 5 months ago

Hey Mark, will the cook book have a section dedicated to bacon? If it doesn’t, it should.

Nic kirkland
Nic kirkland
6 years 5 months ago

How about exercise? We know about chronic cardio, but how about those short, intense workouts that combine lifting heavy things with sprinting(CrossFit for me)?

Ben
Ben
6 years 5 months ago

This was brilliant. Thanks, Mark. Here’s a question though: How do you calculate your lean body mass? How do you compensate for other componenets of you body (i.e. bone, organs, brain etc.)?

Mike
Mike
6 years 5 months ago

I was just thinking that same thing.

Ben
Ben
6 years 5 months ago

Weird.

Nic kirkland
Nic kirkland
6 years 5 months ago

Lean body mass is traditionally everything that’s not fat. So (1-BF%)*weight. There are several simple methods for estimating body fat percentage.

Jack
Jack
6 years 5 months ago

Maybe the bacon kid from wifeswap USA had a point……..

I possibly think that is the greatest quote on this website!

Meghan Waldeck
6 years 5 months ago

OK, as much as I love “there’s no such thing as too much bacon” I would really love to clarify something. it’s not a concern for me but I always get into this discussion with my fiance who has high blood pressure. Is the sodium content of bacon a concern, or are you generally okay as long as you’re getting pastured, nitrate free bacon. We can kill a package on a Saturday morning so this is kind of crucial, haha. And if there’s a resource, please point me to it!

piano-doctor-lady
piano-doctor-lady
6 years 5 months ago

One word (oops, two words)

Side Pork

Bacon without the brine and sugar, from pastured pigs. Use promptly, no preservatives. But if you can get through a package of bacon at a sitting, you can finish side pork fast enough.

Sodium seems to make my muscle aches worse, so I keep a lid on it as well as I can. That eliminates salami and other cold cuts, except as a very occasional treat, also a lot of canned fish like sardines.

Robin
Robin
5 years 5 months ago

I too have discovered the awesomeness that is side pork 🙂 Love it!

Sue
Sue
6 years 5 months ago

Cutting sodium doesn’t drop your blood pressure by much. Low carb diet will see a big fall in blood pressure.

Ashley Mason
5 years 11 months ago
Nitrite has long been a controversial food additive, with studies showing it forms carcinogenic compounds called nitrosamines when heated in the presence of proteins, like those in bacon. Regular bacon is cured with nitrite (NO?) or a virtually identical chemical, nitrate (NO?), both of which act as preservatives, though only nitrite has the potential to form potentially harmful nitrosamines. Bacon labeled “nitrate- or nitrite-free,” on the other hand, is brined with salt, a bacterial lactic acid starter culture, and celery juice (sometimes listed as “natural flavor”). But here’s the catch: Celery juice naturally contains a high level of organic nitrate,… Read more »
Michelle
4 years 3 months ago

I know I’m a little late for the discussion! But that was a really interesting bit of information about bacon, I didn’t realize celery juice contained appreciable levels of nitrates. You say our saliva can break this down into nitrites, does this also mean that when I eat celery with any other meat I might be getting nitrosamines?! Just kidding, ha, I think there probably has to be heat involved in that reaction. But I would be curious in knowing how the nitrosamine levels in any cooked bacon might compare to the TSNAs in tobacco products.

nicknick
nicknick
6 years 5 months ago

Obesity and diabetes connected to lots of sleep? Sounds like the classic correlation vs. causality problem. I wouldn’t be surprised if the lack of energy associated with obesity results in increased sleep, and we all know about diabetes and obesity by now.

Like bacon, there is no such thing as too much sleep–you’ll eventually wake up.

gcb
gcb
6 years 5 months ago

there is no such thing as too much sleep–you’ll eventually wake up

Usually… 🙂

Holly J.
Holly J.
6 years 5 months ago

Or maybe if you have a sluggish thyroid you’re prone to longer sleeping jags. I guess the same could be true if you have an overactive thyroid; need more sleep… It might be a sign that there is something wrong internally if you require more (or maybe less) sleep.

If you’re otherwise following PB, I think you could use the guidelines as a way to make sure you are healthy internally. If your needs are different, it could be used start a conversation with your doctor.

robert
robert
4 years 2 months ago

Except for the last time….

Venkat
Venkat
6 years 5 months ago

Mark,

Have you mentioned the same limits for coffee? I take 2 cups everyday…

Thanks

Venkat

Steven R. McEvoy
6 years 5 months ago

Excellent overview Mark. Thanks again.

Primalchild
Primalchild
6 years 5 months ago

I am wary of the sodium content, as well, since I have one kidney. I was a bit dismayed to plug some foods into fitday and find that my 5 slices of thick bacon give me about 1.6 grams of sodium. Granted, I buy my bacon from a rural butcher so it might not have quite that much in it, but I’m still concerned.

piano-doctor-lady
piano-doctor-lady
6 years 5 months ago

Can you get hold of side pork?

Equally delicious, no sodium added. Maybe your rural butcher can save some aside for you instead of curing it for bacon.

Kalene
Kalene
3 years 7 months ago

PrimalChild,
I am about to start PB. I too, have one kidney. Any issues? I would love to know or get any advice. Thank you!
K

ccarrigan
6 years 5 months ago

Bacon is right up there on my awesome list with espresso, red wine and sex… that’s right, I said it…

wd
wd
6 years 5 months ago

Espresso isn’t so taboo any longer, the little West has become more westernized, slowly catching up pace. Sex, sure… Red wine, don’t be Un-‘merican!

GAT
GAT
6 years 5 months ago

Sex with bacon yum 🙂

TexasPrimalSurfWahine
6 years 5 months ago

To quote http://www.baconfreak.com : “Bacon is Meat Candy”.
But even more so it is BUTTER that leads to nirvana for me!

trackback

[…] (1) By Michael Carney VN:F [1.8.6_1065]Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)From Marks’ Daily Apple: How Much is Too Much?: I’m often asked, however, about the upper ceilings I would set for various elements of the […]

shastagirl
shastagirl
6 years 5 months ago

ah bacon: the candy bar of meats.

tooround
tooround
6 years 5 months ago

I’m very grateful for this. Nice and concise way to explain it to my friends.

Matt F
Matt F
6 years 5 months ago

Bacon bacon bacon!!! Went to a Brazilian Grill this weekend and two items wrapped in bacon kept ending up on my plate. BTW nothing gives a more Primal feel to a meal than meat on a spit.

Dusty
Dusty
6 years 5 months ago

There is no such thing as too much bacon…My dog wrote that for you didn’t she? LOL

biglee
biglee
6 years 5 months ago

“There’s no such thing as too much bacon” I’ve said this for years, now its official! Thanks Mark

Austin
6 years 5 months ago

In regards to protein intake; how do you calculate your lean body mass, it can’t just simply be your weight can it? I weigh 160 lbs so doe that mean my diet throughout the day encompass 160 grams of protein?

Any enlightement from you guys to clarify my confusion would be great.

thanks, steven

Mark
Mark
6 years 5 months ago

Do a search on how to calculate your BMI (body mass index). It will tell you what percentage of your body is fat. The rest of your body is lean body mass (muscle, bone, cartilage, water, etc). For example, a 160lb man who has a BMI of 25% has a lean body mass of 120lbs (160 * .75).

A simple calculator for LBM is at http://www.healthstatus.com/cgi-bin/calc/calculator.cgi . These are simple numbers and estimates, so take them with a grain of bacon…

Austin
6 years 5 months ago

Thanks for the info; it was extremely helpfull

Ed
Ed
6 years 5 months ago

Hi Mark. I think you’re confusing body mass index (BMI) with % bodyfat. BMI is simply weight in kg divided by the square of the height in meters. BMI does not measure % bodyfat, although in general a higher BMI means higher bodyfat, unless you have a lot of muscle mass.

Kelda
6 years 5 months ago

If you know your bodyfat percentage (from scales or caliper tests etc) the balance of your weight is lean mass.

I’m 125 lbs with around 20% bodyfat so my lean mass is 80& of 125 lbs = 100 lbs of lean mass.

Hope that helps.

I love bacon too, and a month ago I was a card carrying vegetarian LOL, Grok on!

golfgirl1227
golfgirl1227
6 years 5 months ago

I’m obviously not Mark- but here’s how I do it.

I take body fat percentage and subtract it from 100 to get LBM percentage and multiply that by total weight.

100-25% body fat = 75% LBM percentage.

150 pounds x .75 = 112.5 pounds of LBM

Lee Edwards
Lee Edwards
6 years 5 months ago

Since muscle affects the BMI, I think it particularly screws up the results of the BMI calculations/charts for women with muscles. The BMI charts are based on average, and on average, most women don’t have much muscle.

Jay
Jay
6 years 5 months ago

Good article.

However, the alcohol link is broken. “Page not found”.

Peggy
Peggy
6 years 5 months ago

They do make a chocolate bar with bacon in it now, btw (I found it at Cost Plus so far). NOW we’re talkin’

FrankOcean
FrankOcean
6 years 5 months ago

Om nom nom nom nom Baconnn…

Alex
Alex
6 years 5 months ago

Sacrilege though it may be, any bacon is too much for me. Not because of the fat or the sodium; I simply don’t care for it. My personal “ad libitum” food happens to be eggs. It helps that I get them from a local farm for $1 a dozen, of course.

Dave
Dave
6 years 5 months ago

I had to laugh when I saw “There’s no such thing as too much bacon.”

Actually I remember when I was in Boy Scouts on a camping trip we cooked up tons of bacon which I consumed to my heart’s content. Unfortunately the effect it had on me prevented me for several years from even being able to think about bacon without wanting to throw up. Fortunately I eventually overcame my repulsion and eat it two or three times a week now, but in moderation.

luc
luc
6 years 5 months ago

No concerns about the sodium nitrite in most types of bacon?

gcb
gcb
6 years 5 months ago

I seem to recall that you get more nitrite from saliva than you do from bacon, although I don’t have a reference handy…

primalpatty
6 years 5 months ago

Oh, no, does that mean no kissing?

dakota
dakota
3 years 3 months ago

i love bacon, and having more is a good idea. but i worry because even many uncured bacon brands have “flavors” as an ingredient. maybe it’s a bit to soon to go wild on the bacon unless you explicitly know the source and ingredients.

i bet homemade bacon far surpasses to store bought flavors. i personally love Beelers brand bacon. http://www.beelerspurepork.com/ but i don’t over do it.

Angelo
Angelo
6 years 5 months ago

Just one question: how about all the salt in bacon? Or is it something else that makes it taste salty?

trackback

[…] Original post by Mark Sisson […]

Allison
Allison
6 years 5 months ago

Ive been eating primal with no counting calories, just lots of reading and learning and feeling good. But how do you figure what your cal’s are when cooking with fats. I don’t measure, should I? what about the meat juices? I know Ive lost a bit of weight, I do workout and get ravenous, but I think regardless of eating primal, how do I know if Im over doing it? Any trial and error suggestions, I feel good.

A2Joe
A2Joe
6 years 5 months ago

“The quarterly Meatpaper was founded by a couple of vegetarians who made the conversion to meat eating a few years back. (The founders say that when vegetarians cross over to the meat-eating dark side, bacon is the most common conversion food.)” From Dr. Michael Eades blog http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/good-eating/schmaltz-and-soy/

Jamie
Jamie
6 years 5 months ago

Threadless.com has an awesome shirt:
“Bacon: the gateway meat”

barehard
barehard
6 years 5 months ago

2 Questions.

1) Does the upper ceiling of protein still apply when trying to gain mass?

2) What does 3 grams of omega 3 look like in real life. I buy the liquid.

gcb
gcb
6 years 5 months ago

2) What does 3 grams of omega 3 look like in real life. I buy the liquid.

That would be around 3.5 milliliters of pure oil, or just under three quarters of a teaspoon full. Obviously it would depend on how pure your oil is though…

Dave
Dave
6 years 5 months ago

I frequently have dinners that consist of nothing but 3-4 strips of bacon and a glass of Sangria

Aaron Curl
6 years 5 months ago

I do the same….except multiply the quantity of bacon by 3 or 4.

CJ
CJ
6 years 5 months ago

Since I’m eating more of the stuff now than ever before, I’ve switched to non-cured bacon as to avoid the nitrates. IMO, it’s not quite as good as the chemical-laden stuff, but hell: it’s still bacon.

chris
chris
6 years 5 months ago

Dr. Eades states in his latest comments section:

“Actually nitrites are a health food so you needn’t spend the time trying to get rid of it. 80 percent of the nitrates and nitrites in the diet come from vegetables sources – processed meats account for little.”

G2baker
G2baker
6 years 5 months ago

I eat thick slice nitrate free bacon, and it’s much better than the thin sliced. Went to a restaurant the other day and had their thick sliced bacon, gag! It was so salty I could hardly eat it.

Noturningback
Noturningback
6 years 5 months ago

Mod er a tion…..Choco late..

Do not compute! ;P

Julie
6 years 5 months ago
Mmmm….bacon is Meat Candy! 🙂 This is a great read Mark, and timely for me as well. I’ve been primal for about two weeks now (a newbie!) and I’ve been wondering about a lot of this. As far as the food items go (vegetables, fruit, animal proteins, fats, and bacon!) I’ve been going with trying to develop an intuitive sense of how much I need, but not trying to limit myself too much, especially since I guess I’m in “transition mode” and am feeling a little tired and maybe a carby hunger pang or two. I’ve managed to stave those… Read more »
Mike
Mike
6 years 5 months ago

Hey wonderful paintings BTW. I’m a portrait painter myself 🙂

Julie
6 years 5 months ago

Thanks Mike!

brian
brian
6 years 5 months ago

What a great post. This makes for a very useful summary. It’s easy to know what types of things can (and should) be eaten but eminently practical to know their limits. Thanks, Mark!

barehard
barehard
6 years 5 months ago

Oh my god. I’ve grossly overestimated my omega 3 requirement. I’ve been necking about 2 TABLEspoons with every meal!!! Whoops.

kat
6 years 5 months ago

I hear you! After some reading I was under the impression that I needed 10-15g daily! Took that much for a few days, ended up with extreme headaches and just had a CT scan (negative). Scary stuff. I think I’ll cut it down regardless of what I’ve heard. And talking to MD’s about this stuff most just pooh-pooh it anyway.

James
James
6 years 5 months ago

Depending on the quality of your fish oil, you may need 2 Tablespoons. The values you should be looking for on the back of your bottle of fish oil is the amount of DHA & EPA (omega3’s) that each serving contains. That might end up being quite a bit if the product you’re using isn’t as pure.

Mike
Mike
6 years 5 months ago

My wife and I make a bacon soup with the ‘pieces and ends,’ it’s soooo good! Anyone wants the recipe hit me up.

primalpatty
6 years 5 months ago

hit

Holly J.
Holly J.
6 years 5 months ago

Send it this way! (Cheetah_812002@yahoo.com)

I keep cooked bacon in the fridge (along with other food) for my son to snack on after school… I try to limit it only when we’re going to eat dinner soon.

Although the look on his face usually tells me that he doesn’t want to ruin his (bacon) snack with dinner. 😀

Aaron Curl
6 years 5 months ago

I love this….a bacon lovers support group….lol. I keep cooked bacon (at least 4 packs a week) in the fridge at all times also. I precook almost all my food in one day (usually sunday)because it saves so much time and I’m single and don’t need “hot prepared meals”. I lead a very simplistic life now thanks to living primal.

TammyB
TammyB
6 years 5 months ago
Aaron – I’m with you. I’m a mother of 2 and have a hubby too. I cook about 8 meals every Friday night. This lasts through the week. Typical fares can be 5lbs of bacon. 9lbs of chicken and other meats. I prepare many meals and have them in the fridge all week. This keeps the guessing out of ‘what’s for dinner’ as well as keeps us on the primal straight and narrow. There’s no question that what’s in the fridge is good for you. Bacon becomes a great snack. My son even bought me some bacon flavored dental floss… Read more »
Mike
Mike
6 years 5 months ago
Okay, Get the stock pot hot like a skillet and throw about a pound of bacon ends in, cook till done. Remove the bacon, save till the end. Do NOT remove the bacon fat. Add about a quart of Turkey stock, or chicken and half or 3/4’s cup turkey fat to deglaze the pan. ( This was initially a leftover night recipe) and 2 cups water. Add a half to whole yellow onion (depending on your taste, I like the whole thing) Add two carrots, chopped. Add 2 tbl spoons celery seeds. 2 tbl spoons ground pepper 1 tbl spoon… Read more »
CJ
CJ
6 years 5 months ago

Seriously? The rendered fat from a pound of bacon, 3/4 cup of poultry fat, and a half stick of butter?

I am sure this tastes great, but dang… it makes the roof of my mouth greasy just thinking about it.

Kevin
Kevin
6 years 5 months ago

What about eggs?

I was eating three a day for breakfast (omega-3 boosted), then read a comment by Mark about allergy buildup, so I’ve cut back.

Any concept of what the daily/weekly egg limit would be?

Thanks,
KJ

Bobby G
Bobby G
6 years 5 months ago

KJ

Allergy to cooked eggs is very common. The heat changes the entire composition and nutrients of eggs. I have been eating eggs neary every day for a few years . The best way to consume them is raw (like Grok). I have never had an issue with salmonella either. Get the highest quality eggs you can buy (organic, cage free-AAA even better) and make a protien shake blending the eggs as little as possible at the end. You should not have allergy problems eating your eggs this way.

Good luck

Daniel Merk
6 years 5 months ago
Spot on with bacon, however where are most of you getting truly pastured bacon that is nitrate/nitrite free? Several big brands on the market selling “Nitrate free, vegetarian fed, non-hormone” pork bacon has much blood on their hands with this false claim. Since bacon is usually fat, I would guess that the Omega6s are 20:1 to 3’s because of what they are actually fed. “Vegetarian fed” simply means that they were not fed meat. In pig farming, ONLY does grain apply here. As a matter of fact, I’ve not been able to locate on a mass market level a bacon… Read more »
chris
chris
6 years 5 months ago

Dr. Eades states in his latest comments section:

“Actually nitrites are a health food so you needn’t spend the time trying to get rid of it. 80 percent of the nitrates and nitrites in the diet come from vegetables sources – processed meats account for little.”

Classic
Classic
6 years 5 months ago

I get the best bacon and pork products from Thundering Hooves farm (located in Walla Walla Washinton. They also do mail order I believe.

Karla
Karla
6 years 5 months ago

Thanks Classic! Live in western WA and have a really hard time finding pastured, grass finished anything. If anyone knows of any on the Kitsap Peninsula area, I would greatly appreciate the info. I have signed up for a couple sites on the internet, but have not received any interest in selling to this area.

Classic
Classic
6 years 5 months ago

Karla,
TH delivers all over the state. Check out there website. For some reason I cannot add that here but you can google for it.

Mike Morgan
Mike Morgan
6 years 5 months ago
Classic
Classic
6 years 5 months ago

website for Thundering Hooves is
http://www.thunderinghooves.net/

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