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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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September 12, 2007

Homeopathy: Can We Please, As a Society, Let This One Go?

By Mark Sisson
97 Comments

You hear us rant almost daily about the ridiculous machinations of the modern medical establishment, namely the reliance on drugs and surgery to “fix” health issues that could often be better dealt with or eliminated with simple lifestyle changes. Modern medicine has become a bureaucratic, money-driven actuarial game wherein individual patient rights are routinely sacrificed for the greater good of large populations. And so you hear, “The operation was a success, but the patient died.” or, “We don’t care that you refuse to get vaccinated. You need to do it so the rest of us don’t die from an epidemic of this obscure disease.” Or “Despite debilitating side effects, this new drug appears to benefit 22% of patients who take it.”

For that reason I am a big fan of “integrated medicine,” which combines the best elements of conventional medical methods with some forms of complementary and alternative medicine – when research suggests that these alternatives might provide better benefits with fewer side effects or complications. A lot of doctors are now embracing this new vision of medicine which includes diet and lifestyle alterations, stress management techniques, biofeedback, and the use of certain vitamin regimens and herbal therapies when drugs or surgery just don’t seem ethical. Good for them and better for us. But often lumped in with that group is another specific “branch” of medicine I find ludicrous and which I need to explore with you, since many of my readers tend to assume it is a legitimate option within the “alternative” camp.

That branch is called homeopathy.

Ironically, many people willingly accept homeopathy as a legitimate form of medicine simply because no one has explained to them how silly it is…despite having been in existence for almost 200 years with no reputable studies to prove that it works. Many assume that homeopathy is equivalent to “herbal medicine” and that those little homeopathy pills or tinctures are just smaller versions of the research-proven herbal extracts that often do have real benefits. But nothing could be further from the truth.

The basic theory behind homeopathy involves stimulating the body’s ability to heal itself by providing minute doses of substances that in larger amounts would cause illness. It is often referred to as “like cures like” or “The Law of Similars”. Take a little of the “hair of the dog that bit you” (literally, in some cases). Now dilute it with water and shake vigorously. Now dilute it and shake it again, and again, until it is so dilute that only one part per billion remains. Sorry, it’s still not dilute enough. To make it even “stronger” we need to dilute it to parts per trillion or less! (This is known in homeopathy as the “Law of Infinitesimals” and in science as “officially nothing”). Under the theory of homeopathy, the substance being diluted confers some vibrational energy that remains in the water and which enables the body to heal itself…or at least deal with the symptoms of the condition, since homeopathy doesn’t seem to concern itself with the origin of the disease.

I am astounded that people today still believe that homeopathy has any place in modern medicine. It was developed in the early 1800s by a “physician” named Samuel Hahnemann on a misguided theory that he could restore the body’s “vital forces” using these diluted and vigorously shaken poisons to release “immaterial and spiritual powers.” Please. Almost more ridiculous is the fact that this theory hasn’t changed much in the ensuing 200 years and yet homeopathy is still practiced by otherwise knowledgeable “doctors”.

Homeopathy is even unofficially recognized by the FDA as a form of treatment. How, you ask, could our government condone such silly practices? Simply because there is no way anyone can be harmed by homeopathic remedies. Remember, the more “powerful” the homeopathic remedy is, the less of anything it contains. The FDA has its hands full trying to prevent myriad needless deaths from countless new drugs. They simply look the other way when a homeopathic remedy claims to treat a disease or condition because they know that no one will be hurt (unless by relying on the homeopathic cure, the patient forgoes more effective treatment). Since supplement manufacturers are not allowed to make disease claims, some unscrupulous supplement companies have even moved into the lucrative homeopathy business just to be able to legally claim their products treat disease.

So how is it that so many people swear by their homeopathic remedies and truly believe they work? There’s your answer right there: belief. Blind faith and the placebo effect. (Wasn’t that Ginger Baker’s third band?) The placebo effect occurs when a patient gets better simply as a result of his/her positive expectations that the treatment will work. Some studies show that 50% of people taking a placebo will experience significant improvement if they believe they were given a strong medicine. The mind is a very powerful tool in healing the body, as any Christian Scientist or Voodoo believer will tell you. And that’s all that’s happening in the case of homeopathy. Blind faith. And maybe there’s nothing wrong with that, except that it takes the focus away from the cause of your affliction.

Bottom line: if you are willing to suspend disbelief and are a sucker for placebos, then homeopathy is just what the doctor ordered. Otherwise, let’s see how eating well, exercising and controlling stress might better address the situation.

The Horse’s Mouth

Quackwatch

Further Reading at the Blog:

10 Dumbest Drugs Ever Invented

10 Worst Health Scams

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97 Comments on "Homeopathy: Can We Please, As a Society, Let This One Go?"

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Crystal
Crystal
9 years 15 days ago

Alternative, natural, herbal, homeopathic…
I think people are confused. I’m confused. Most people think it’s all the same.
In some situations, a placebo effect is a good thing!

Laurena
5 years 7 months ago
Honestly, just because you can’t explain it doesn’t mean it’s just a placebo effect. Not many people understand energy fields in the body. Once string theory becomes proven and published, you will better understand how something you can’t see can still exist. Check out Dr David Reilly. He went into homeopathic research to disprove it. Do his surprise, he couldn’t. And now he tests and tests and publishes his results in the Lancet. Here read this: http://www.amacf.org/2006/07/the_homeopathic.html Look, I don’t care if you believe it or not but why call people fools that have tried and get real benefits from… Read more »
Matthew Caton
4 years 6 months ago

One homeopathic treatment that I know has been proven to work is Zicam. I carry some with me wherever I am. I haven’t had a cold in over five years. Other cold remedies have never proven useful for me. Echinachea, and cold eeze have been flops.

Greg
Greg
4 years 6 months ago
Well, it supplies an absolutely tiny amount of zinc which I doubt has done anything to prevent your colds. ‘Homeopathic’ means that the ingredients are diluted with purified water until they no longer exist and only the water remains. The whole section in stores should be renamed ‘fraud’, ‘scam’, or ‘hydration’. The placebo effect is really strong. People get a stronger effect from 3 sugar pills instead of 1 sugar pill. Or an injection vs a pill. The brain plays tricks. Animals are not subject to the placebo effect though because they don’t understand what the medicine is supposed to… Read more »
Serena
2 years 2 months ago

Maybe hydration explains all reported homeopathic benefits. I know water can resolve some symptoms even when I don’t feel thirsty.

Richard Ahlquist
9 years 15 days ago
I suppose thats why allergy shots don’t work. I watched a documentary 2 years ago on some scientific triple blind testing done of homeopathic cures and the results were unreal, 63% success rate in treatment. Well above placebo effect. I’ll see if I can find the information. Keep in mind though; Hydrogen sulfide at 50-100 ppm leads to eye damage. Six parts per trillion estrogen added to a lake was enough to cause Male fish to grow Female tissue. http://addendumb.blogspot.com/2007/07/fetid-fatal-fish-flesh.html I dont think California would be lowering arsenic levels at huge costs to less than 3 parts per trillion if… Read more »
Trevor
Trevor
4 years 8 months ago
Background: I am a Water Resource Analyst at a utility in the Coachella Valley and I sit on the Water Quality Committee at the Association of California Water Agencies. I’m in charge of helping my organization prepare for a new Maximum Contaminant Level around chromium (VI) that is expected in CA and spend a lot of time dealing with parts per [x] of various constituents in our groundwater, so I think I’m somewhat qualified to comment here. You make a good point that trace levels of contaminants can be extraordinarily powerful, particularly the case of pharmaceuticals in our waterways and… Read more »
Molly Malone
Molly Malone
1 year 7 months ago

Trevor, if I had heroes you would be one of them! Thank you.

Eileen
10 months 23 days ago

Hmm, I guess homeopathy’s effect on my dog’s aural hematoma is my imagination, in that she still has the condition and my belief in homeopathy is making me too blind to see that her ear is still puffed up like a grapefruit. Surely it couldn’t be due to the placebo effect as there is no such thing (as least not documented) for animals.

Trevor
Trevor
10 months 21 days ago
Glad your doggy is feeling better! It always breaks my heart when pets are suffering. Your story is a compelling anecdote, but it doesn’t prove a causal relationship, and it doesn’t change the mathematics of chemistry. I believe that you treated your dog, and that she recovered. Great! The only part you’re imagining is that her recovery was due to a biological mechanism caused by homeopathy. There are too many variables to determine causality from one instance, and besides, most hematomas heal in a few days to weeks naturally. http://www.sw.org/HealthLibrary?page=Hematoma As for the “no placebo effect in dogs”…quite the contrary.… Read more »
kkh369
kkh369
7 months 15 days ago

venomous? THERES NOTHING IN IT!!!

Ryan
Ryan
9 years 15 days ago

Despite how silly the concept is, researchers tend to get strong results when studying homoepathy. You shouldn’t discount it just because it doesn’t seem logical. The placebo effect doesn’t really make sense to me but I can’t deny that it happens.

Pelikan
Pelikan
9 years 15 days ago

There is another effect than the placebo effect: “search and you shill find”. Maybe the illness would have gone away anyway. An insect bite doesn’t last more than a day or two without treatment, but if a homeopathic ointment is used, the curing can be seen as an effect of the “treatment”. Man want to find cause-effect relationships, our brain is built that way.

I say “bullshit” to homeopathy, but not too loudly; both my mother-in-law and my husband are believers… Homeopathy is big in France (and Germany, I think).

Mark
Mark
9 years 15 days ago
Richard, I don’t get that you were sarcastic at all. No need to apologize. I love these numbers games…and that’s certainly what homeopathy is all about. The cases you cite are a little off topic: 1) the article on male fish/estrogen actually suggests that 1 ppt in water will equate to many parts per billion up the food chain. That would be 10,000 or more parts per billion inthe actual fish, 2) We all know how reactionary California is. The EPA allows aresenic at 10 parts per billion (which equals 10,000 parts per trillion) of arsenic which is a naturally… Read more »
jonathan spencer
9 years 15 days ago

this is an interesting link to research on homeopathy and subsequent links to sites that report this research:

http://www.healinginealing.com/homeopathyresearch.php

Nancy
Nancy
9 years 15 days ago

I assume then that the research currently being done involving peanut allergy and giving those who react to peanuts minute/trace amounts of the nut and then gradually increasing it is not considered homeopathy? I don’t have any reference to link to, but I saw a news story about this. Now if only they can do this for the things my ds is allergic to, though they aren’t life threatening so I have little hope.

McFly
McFly
9 years 15 days ago

I wonder if this works for music. If I listen to one country song out of every billion rock songs I listen to, will I eventually stop wearing a cowboy hat?

Mark
Mark
9 years 15 days ago

Nancy,t hat is absolutely NOT homeopathy.

McFly, only if you want to stop wearing a cowboy hat. In this case a “beret” is considered a placebo. Try it. We still may have to do an intervention.

Ann
Ann
9 years 15 days ago

I really don’t understand all the fuss about homeopathy.

If its Rx are only diluted solutions, how is it going to hurt anyone? Why do we need a campaign to remove it from society? If you don’t like it, go elsewhere for treatments. There’s enough warnings around to make people wary about depending any alternative therapies in general. So, why focus on homeopathy?

However way you want to look at, homeopathy is still quite popular from England to Argentina.

kkh369
kkh369
7 months 15 days ago

all the FUSS is about the fact that companies charge 15, 20, 30 dollars and up for a 2oz vial of WATER. a 1oz bottle of LACTOSE. these are the modern day “snake oil salesmen”. they are charging ungodly amounts of money for NOTHIING. complete and total ripoffs. and maybe they sell someone something that claims to “cure” something, when that patient should go to an actual doctor!!! if you are cool with paying 20 bucks for a 1oz vial of water, i guess thats your prerogative. UGH

P.Wagle
9 years 15 days ago
The argument against Homoeopathy itself appears to be silly. Do you think lakhs and lakhs of people across the globe are fools and stake their lives to please Homoeopaths ? Not at all . If somebody can not understand the Homoeopathic theory and philosophy , if some one fails to see the truth how Homoeopathy has actually cured a host of conditions including those requiring surgery it is not the problem with the system or the patients. By saying that even the cured patients had blind faith in the placebo – then it just questioning their intellectual capability and honesty… Read more »
kkh369
kkh369
7 months 15 days ago

at least big pharma actually sells SOMETHING. if you are ok with paying 20 bucks for a 1oz vial of sugar pills, then be my guest. theres a sucker born every minute as they say.

Bradford
Bradford
9 years 14 days ago
Ann and Wagle, The diluted solutions certainly aren’t going to hurt anyone. What hurts people is when they ignore effective medical cures for a homeopathic alternative (i.e. mom gives kid homeopathic medicine to treat leukemia, kid dies). Wagle, you bring up a good point that Big Pharma isn’t always out to tell us what is good for us. In fact, often it is in their best interest to keep us sick in order to keep selling us medicine. However, this is the EXACT same case for companies producing homeopathic medicines, they are just as money driven as big pharma (prove… Read more »
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[…] body via your computer. What will they come up with next? See Mark’s scathing breakdown of homeopathy – or, more accurately, of bad […]

Ricky Common Misbelive of Homeopathy
Ricky Common Misbelive of Homeopathy
8 years 11 months ago
Number 1 misbelieve about homeopathy is it heals diseases. It never heals any disease or symptoms rather it creates aggravation. I had night false problem 10 years back( my semen used to fall once or twice in a week at night) When I took homeopathy medicine and it aggravated and became 6-7 days in a week and soon I became impotent. The homeopath gave different medicine like nux Acid phos and some other , I remained impotent for 4-5 years this is nothing but aggravation. One day I bought a homeopathy book and found that I felt the symptoms exactly… Read more »
Lisa
Lisa
8 years 10 months ago

Excellent piece! (Criticizing homeopathy got me kicked out of naturopathy college.)

Just look at the research. When the patient and doctor both know who’s getting what, homeopathy works. When the doctor (but not the patient) knows, homeopathy works. When it’s subjected to double-blind tests, it fails.

trackback

[…] claiming anything along those lines, that is a red flag. But what many of these products do – and homeopathic remedies do not fall into this category as they’re completely worthless – is simply boost your immune […]

Kevin Kane, MD
8 years 10 months ago
Homeopathy was started around the same time medicine was still using leeches! There were no anesthetics or antibiotics, let alone modern sanitation. At that time medicine may have hurt just as many people as it helped. In this setting, a new form of treatment, homeopathy, was born and thrived. It is likely that neither form of treatment helped much, but at least homeopathy didn’t hurt people. Fast forward 200 years and we’ve learned a lot about mechanisms of many diseases, as well as defense and treatment of them. No one (with a clear head) would discount that a myriad of… Read more »
kkh369
kkh369
7 months 15 days ago

i know this is old, but you sir are AWESOME!

VeeJay
13 days 21 hours ago

I’m not really advocating homeopathy here, but leeches are starting to be used again from time to time even in modern medicine. Just not very often and in REALLY specific cases.

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[…] Homeopathy Is an Unscientific Scam […]

Clinton
8 years 10 months ago

There are well documented cases of cures through homeopathy where “modern medicine” has failed constantly.

Kevin Kane: the notion that we have made incredible advancements in medicine is largely hogwash. Yes, we sterilize today… and yes, we certainly do make a pile more cash, but do we solve any more than we did fifty years ago?

Craproo to you… hogwash.

🙂

I would rather try homeopathy than go to an allopath. Surgery, surgery, surgery… and so on.

all hogwash…

Witch doctor
Witch doctor
3 years 2 months ago

You are delusional 😀
Is there a homeopathic cure for that? Datura?

Christopher Black
Christopher Black
3 years 2 months ago

Youre right pal everything is the same as it was 200 years ago! I still see my Doctor Barber for surgery once a month.

I am sure everyone of you has a family member living today ONLY thanks to “allopathy”

kkh369
kkh369
7 months 15 days ago

enjoy your very expensive sugar pills.

yah
yah
8 years 8 months ago

homeopathy is absolute bullshit

Why? “The more you distill the remedy, the stronger it gets”

That is their mantra, and they believe in vibrations of plants and the spirit of the plant getting into the water.

All you’re drinking is alcohol and sulfites, it’s potential lethal.

Christine Sutherland
8 years 6 months ago
Hi Mark When you wrote “Just look at the research. When the patient and doctor both know who’s getting what, homeopathy works. When the doctor (but not the patient) knows, homeopathy works. When it’s subjected to double-blind tests, it fails.” you summed up the whole argument. Homeopathy doesn’t work. But the therapist-client liaison may work, and suggestion may work. My complaint is against therapists who use smoke and mirrors in treatment instead of proven strategies. When we use proven strategies within a good therapist-client liaison, the outcomes are much better. Why settle for snake oil? And I’d really like to… Read more »
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zach
zach
8 years 3 months ago

Of course you’ve heard about the patient who forgot to take his homeopathic medicine and died of an overdose?

trackback
8 years 2 months ago

Jim Kathy Stull…

I cringe every time I hear so called“ health experts” recommend restriction of dietary fat, claiming that a low- fat diet is the key to good health, weight loss, and prevention of degenerative diseases. Restriction of any one macronutrient (protein, ca…

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[…] Homeopathy: Can’t We Please, As a Society, Let This One Go? […]

Ailu
Ailu
7 years 9 months ago

ZACH# May 30th, 2008 at 3:34 pm

“Of course you’ve heard about the patient who forgot to take his homeopathic medicine and died of an overdose?”

BWAHAHAHAHAHA!! Good’un, Zach! 😀

trackback
7 years 9 months ago

[…] Homeopathy: Can’t We Please, As a Society, Let This One Go? […]

Alicia
Alicia
7 years 9 months ago
How do you respond to products like Native Remedies, http://www.nativeremedies.com They provide much research and references to back up their products. I personally used one for my son and even the teacher at school noticed a difference. Take a look. I’d love to hear WHY it won’t work and how you fault all the findings they cite. Also, what about allergy shots? That is the philosophy behind those and those made a remarkable difference in my life. I went from using my inhaler several times daily (allergen and exercise induced asthma)to not even having an inhaler. It took about a… Read more »
kkh369
kkh369
7 months 15 days ago

native remedies sells herbal medicines. herbal medicines actually have HERBS IN THEM!! homeopathy is WATER AND SUGAR PILLS. sorry, but its true.

MikeL
MikeL
7 years 9 months ago

The Principle of Homeopathy: the less substantive a theory, the greater its predictive power.

trackback
7 years 9 months ago

[…] Homeopathy? […]

PB
PB
7 years 2 months ago

My 3 year old girl’s glue ear got treated successfully only through homeopathy after our NHS GP gave up.

Placebo? On a three year old girl? Yeah, right.

Mark, sorry but in this article you sounded precisely like those nutritionists who claim grains are good.

You want to win arguments? Sure, go ahead. I know who I’ll call next time my girl has glue ear again.

Greg
Greg
4 years 6 months ago

90% of cases resolve themselves in 3 months.

kkh369
kkh369
7 months 15 days ago

hopefully for your daughter, an ear doctor.

Ailu
Ailu
7 years 2 months ago

Sorry to disappoint, PB, but the “homeopathic” treatments for ear glue that actually work are at 6X, a dilution that still has a small amount of the original herbal still left in it. True homeopathy would be at a 60X solution. Trouble is, they don’t work at this dilution. Homeopathic believers had to lower their dilutions in order to pass double-blind studies. Your daughter benefited from herbal medicine, not homeopathy.

PB
PB
7 years 2 months ago

Ailu
You win. I lose. Happy?

MacDog
MacDog
7 years 1 month ago

Ailu: it’s not anywhere near so personal as you received that. You are not your point. 🙂

Also, why wouldn’t placebos work on a person who believes nigh anything their parent tells them? It stands to reason it’d have more of an effect than normal.

Ailu
Ailu
7 years 1 month ago

MacDog, based on the context, I’m thinking your comments may have been directed at PB and not me. Correct me if I am wrong.

PB, my goal is not to win, but to share information on an issue that might not have taken into consideration. Sorry if I offended you in the process, that was not my intention. I will work to frame my posts in a kinder way.

kkh369
kkh369
7 months 15 days ago

you were stating facts. if someone cant handle that, then screw em. i mean, really. he was just plain wrong. and then it gets all personal. o please already. he thought he was using homeopathy, when he was actually using herbal medicine. which is legit. you pointed that out. then he gets all defensive. i feel for his kid.

PB
PB
7 years 1 month ago

Ailu,
Thanks for your comments. Peace.

Take care.

Zabet
Zabet
7 years 1 month ago

As for “It worked for the cousin of a friend of a coworker of my aunt” stories, remember one principle: The plural of anecdote is not data.

Clinton
Clinton
7 years 1 month ago
This is one thread that never stops giving 🙂 In a world where I see pharmaceuticals introduced that barely exceed the effectiveness of a placebo, and I see all the naysayers lined up against unconventional medicing, I am left wondering why? I suspect it’s the lack of “millions of dollars of research” and white clothing. In my personal experience, everything is as effective as you believe it to be. I don’t have the study to reference, but there was a good one comparison on knee surgery – where there were three groups – two types of invasive surgery, one who… Read more »
Dan Hig
Dan Hig
1 year 11 months ago
Agree: whether or not homeopathy is more than placebo is hardly the most pressing question. Mark said it does no harm unless it prevents someone from otherwise getting proper treatment. On the flip side, it may help far more people who take this (at worst) harmless placebo instead of positively harmful drugs. How many doctors routinely prescribe antibiotics for ailments which would get better themselves? What about the myriad studies on vaccinations being ineffective and dangerous? What about the anti-depressants which have effects not measurably better than placebo but with massive side effects and even increased risk of suicide, which… Read more »
sceptic
sceptic
7 years 1 month ago

Clinton,

“I don’t have the study to reference, but there was a good one comparison on knee surgery – where there were three groups – two types of invasive surgery, one who received the cut and no surgery. They were equally effective – including the folks who had no surgery at all, but believed that they had surgery”

This kind of thing happens all the time in conventional medicine. The point is though that if the result holds up then conventional medicine stops doing this type of surgery. Homeopaths on the other hand keep right on going.

Clinton
Clinton
7 years 1 month ago

Well, if only that were true, then the entire “conventional medical system” would be largely out of business, but it isn’t.

It’s a business, big business.

And you can rest assured – despite the fact that the surgery was useless, it has not slowed the number of invasive knee surgeries… full speed ahead.

And they make the homeopaths look like a bunch of rookies, if we look at the dollars paid versus success.

Horrible, but true.

Christopher Black
Christopher Black
3 years 2 months ago

Homeopathy is BIG business, with obscene profits margins!

This is true, and unlike your mystery knee-surgery anecdote, a credible source may be found with a simple google search: Search for homeopathy 20 million dollar duck.

And Clinton, you should have every right to drink sun tea instead of Benadryl if you want to, but when people like you go into the public square with these deliberately misleading and unfounded claims, the harmless sun tea becomes proverbial Kool-Aid and encouraging others to drink it makes you in part responsible for their deaths.

Keep on trucking though.

reamika
reamika
7 years 14 days ago

did you hear about the homeopath who forgot to take his medicine?

he died of an overdose

VckyLockwud
6 years 10 months ago

Thats cool. I agree, that was a good post!Dude a friend of mine has been was tring to increase semen volume. He try all natural threaph, they were working, but very slow, so at the end, he try try semen volume pills to increase prodcution, volume and flavour. yes results were great. so my suggestion if u want to sperm count and fertility rate then get spermomax

Get Fee Spermox to semen pills

FitJerks Fitness Blog
6 years 10 months ago

While I tend to have similar believes that the “medicinal ingredients” in homeopathy pills are pretty much useless,

whats fascinating is that the placebo effect is getting stronger in humans all the time and if homeopathy somehow elicits this response then why the hell not?

Ma Flintstone
Ma Flintstone
4 years 3 months ago
This is what I’m thinking too FitJerks. Example; I had both my two old root canal’d teeth taken out over an 8 month period (2011/2012). The first was a big gnarly molar that had never been right. I blame me for living so seriously full-on it needed to be done in the first place, not doing enough research on root canals, and the cretinous old dentist for missing an entire rotted canal. I digress. When it was out I mislaid my homeopathic treatment instructions and only took a couple of drops. I had all sorts of dramas like bleeding a… Read more »
baj
baj
6 years 8 months ago

Agreed! Who cares WHAT it is if it works… it’s seriously arrogant to say that we ‘know’, when there is yet so much to be uncovered.

mike
mike
6 years 8 months ago

Well said. This nonsense and the uneducated fools who “practise” it are a danger to public health.

Quacks : you’ve had 200 years, you haven’t provided a shred of evidence and everything we know about the world suggests homeopathy can’t work. Let it go. Do something useful and honest with your life.

Steve Scarfia
6 years 5 months ago

Being that I’m going into Naturopathic Medicine, I will have to learn homeopathy as part of the curriculum. I don’t really think it works, but maybe that placebo effect is what is needed sometimes. No matter though, Naturopaths are taught a multitude of treatment options that DO work (and lots of them are grounded in scientific evidence). I will just grin and bear it when it comes time to taking the homeopathy courses.

Steve

Adam
Adam
6 years 2 months ago

“Six parts per trillion estrogen added to a lake was enough to cause Male fish to grow Female tissue.”

What you have to realise is that this is trillions of trillions of trillions times more concentrated than homeopathic remedies. What you have there is about an 4C concentration. Typical remedies of 30C are 1 part in 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. Or, to put it in other terms, less than 1 part per every atom in the known universe.

That’s straight up bullshit.

MamaGrok
MamaGrok
5 years 11 months ago

Oh, I’m so glad you did this one, even if I’m 3 years late. I strongly believe in herbal medicine before allopathic, and prevention via diet, sunshine, and exercise before all of it – but homeopathy? Meh. Never bought it.

Mike
5 years 11 months ago

The placebo effect is used so much today and does seem to work for lots of people. The mind is a wonderful thing when it comes to healing the body.

Jeff
5 years 10 months ago

I saw a TED talk where the presenter took an entire bottle of this homeopathic sleeping medicine. He’s been doing that act for hundreds of talks and nothing has ever happened.

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