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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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March 24, 2008

Dear Mark: Cheap Meat?

By Mark Sisson
111 Comments

Dear Mark,

I am curious what you recommend for people who either don’t have access to or can’t regularly afford grass-fed, organic, free-range meats? It [cost] is a lot of the reason we are mostly vegetarian – we could have organic meat on a regular basis, or we can have fresh fruits and veggies for us and, more importantly, our young sons, to snack on. I believe the fresh produce is more important, and our budget just won’t allow for both, so we stick to mostly vegetarian – and less expensive – sources of protein. I’d like to hear tips for how to actually apply some of this in these situations, and what you recommend then. Is it better to eat less meat and make sure what you have is organic, or keep eating the same amount of the conventional stuff (which is worse for our bodies and the environment)?

Judy, you raise a number of great points, and I know they’re common concerns. Ideally, we would all eat grass-fed/grass-finished meat all the time, but because of a variety of circumstances (budget, limited availability at home/during travel, etc.) it’s not always possible for people, myself included. For these reasons, the Primal Blueprint also looks at logical, reasonable compromises. If I can’t eat grass-fed meat, I look for the cleanest meat I can find (no hormones, no antibiotics, etc.). But I absolutely suggest that people include meat in their diets, even if they don’t have access to grass-fed.

First, let’s look at the issue of availability. Unfortunately, grass-fed and/or organic meats aren’t carried by many grocery stores. However, I think that trend is beginning to change. While Whole Foods, Wild Oats and community co-ops seem to be the most common sources for these items, more and more “regular” supermarkets are getting in the game. As always, the more people request it, the more likely stores will consider adding these options. That said, there’s a substantial mail order market for grass-fed and/or organic meats, many with competitive pricing.

Another option: small area farms that sell direct to consumers. You’ll usually get the best deal by purchasing 25 lbs. to half a cow, lamb, goat, etc. If you have a deep freezer, it’s ideal. Otherwise, find a few friends, neighbors, or family members who you can split an order with.

Also, just a note about labels… Meat that is labeled grass-fed isn’t necessarily “grass-finished.” Nearly all beef cattle eat grass at some point. Others, those usually labeled grass-fed, eat grass until the final few weeks before slaughter, when they’re switched to a grain diet. During this relatively brief window, the omega ratio reverses to pretty much that of mostly/entirely grain-fed cattle. Look for “grass-finished” or “100% grass-fed.” Though many farms that raise grass-fed cattle also follow other “clean meat” standards, not all do. USDA Organic uses the most stringent rules and certification, including the absence of any pesticides or herbicides on grazing land/feed and moderate animal treatment standards. But keep in mind, also, that USDA Organic doesn’t mean grass-fed. On top of all of this, we’re seeing a new class of “animal-welfare” labels offered by industry certification as well as animal-rights groups. (Whole Foods manages its own standards and labeling.) (I know, Judy, you’ve asked about this element as well.) Standards for these certifications vary considerably. If you buy direct from a farm, you may be able to get the most information about how the animals are raised.

While it’s true that “100% grass-fed, organic” offers the best of all worlds, it’s usually more expensive and more difficult to find. My advice for best compromises: first look for a label that says 100% grass-fed with “no hormones” and “no antibiotics.” This kind of meat encompasses important “clean” elements (in terms of an individual’s consumption) and offers the better grass-fed omega ratio. Next choice: clean, grain-fed meats. Just be sure to add more omega 3s from fish, fish oil supplements and vegetables sources to make up for the 6:3 ratio deficit.

Thanks, as always, for your questions and comments. Keep ‘em coming!

ILoveButter Flickr Photo (CC)

Further Reading:

Dear Mark: Pondering Protein

Imitation Crab: What is That Stuff?

Dr. Michael Eades: Another Reason to Eat Grass Fed Beef

Typical North American Diet is Deficient in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

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111 Comments on "Dear Mark: Cheap Meat?"

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Jen
Jen
8 years 6 months ago

Good answer, Mark. To directly answer Judy’s question – it’s better to eat high quality meat less often than poor quality meat frequently.

Also – don’t forget about eggs! Eggs are a wonderful source of healthy fats and protein (7g/egg), and they are very affordable. Locally raised eggs from pastured chickens are best, with organic eggs next.

For me, I try to eat high quality meat 2-3 days a week, and eggs the rest of the time. I think this provides a good balance between high-quality animal protein and affordability.

Dave C.
8 years 6 months ago

This post means I have to do some checking. I’ve been eating grass-fed beef but I don’t know if the labeling certifies that it is “grass-finished.” Thanks for pointing that out. This may take a call to the corporate office. For any fellow Texans reading this, I’m getting mine at the H.E.B. Plus here in Corpus. I know they are expanding the “Plus” concept throughout the state so you might want to check it out.

Dave
DaveGetsFit

roberta
roberta
6 years 6 months ago

well dave, i found a site and heb`s beef is only finished organic so its not 100% as i was hoping.hopefully that will be changing. soon.

Tracy
Tracy
8 years 6 months ago

No cow is “happy” who will be slaughtered for her flesh.

There is absolutely no reason to eat meat. One’s health, the environment and the animals will be better off if one gives up meat.

Please choose a compassionate, cruelty-free diet!

—————-
Like animals? http://www.chooseveg.com/vegetarians-save-lives.asp
Wanna lose weight? http://www.chooseveg.com/obesity.asp
Care about the environment? http://www.chooseveg.com/global-warming.asp

Mimi
Mimi
5 years 7 days ago

My grandparents would roll in their graves if they saw your food pyramid. Your diet is CRUEL!

Charles
Charles
8 years 6 months ago

While I agree with all you said, and eat grass-fed meat where possible, this article has an interesting take on whether the Omega-6/Omega-3 ratio in beef is relevant.

http://spartantraining.blogspot.com/2008/03/is-omega-6omega-3-ratio-of-beef.html

Mark Sisson
8 years 6 months ago

Tracy,

You must be new here. We are long past that vegetarian argument. The entire premise of this site is that we evolved over 2 1/2 million years of eating vegetables, fruits, nuts and meat, and that continuing to do so can and does improve health in most, if not all, people.

Charles
Charles
8 years 6 months ago

Tracy,

I’m just curious, do you think the Inuit should be on non-flesh diet as well? Do you think they are immoral for their dietary choices of animal flesh?

Pencils
Pencils
3 years 19 days ago

Immoral? No. Fat? Yes.

Mike OD - IF Life
8 years 6 months ago

Tracy,

Enjoy your high grain, leaky gut, arthritis, high BP and Cholesterol medicine too. I don’t mind vegans, I mind pushy vegans who don’t have a clue what they are talking about. That being said….you kill more animals with overabundance consumption of grains and agriculture than you do with consumption of meat. Not that you will ever read this, but at least become educated on what you preach: (If I can save one vegan…then I have hope for the world..)
http://www.beyondveg.com/nicholson-w/hb/hb-interview1a.shtml

Mark Sisson
8 years 6 months ago

Charles,

Good link. Thanks for sending it. Goes to show you that my 3,000 mg fish oil per day go a long way to re-balancing any 6:3 ratio I might have upset by selecting grain-fed beef. I’m feeling healthier already (and less inflamed). 🙂

Mark Sisson
8 years 6 months ago

Mike OD,

I’m sure Tracy means well. She just wandered into the wrong health site…

Meanwhile, that beyondveg.com is one of the greatest resources for anyone wanting the full scoop on why we eat meat. A wealth of information. Thanks for linking.

Mike OD - IF Life
8 years 6 months ago

I meant what I said for Tracy only with loving caringness. 😀 As for the beyondveg site, it’s amazing what it has on all Paleo related topics. Someone needs to just make a movie about that site…as it is just way too much to read! (that and people need that kind of info)

Judy
Judy
8 years 6 months ago
Thanks for the response! Jen: I absolutely could not stomach eggs for years. I went through a stage where I was pretty poor, and clueless as to how to eat well on little money, and so I ate a LOT of eggs, but then I lost the taste for them completely. Now I can eat eggs again, and my husband will, but I can’t seem to get either of my sons to touch them. I think I need to just try it more often and eventually they will eat them. Dave: I envy your location. I’m in McAllen, TX, but… Read more »
Mike OD - IF Life
8 years 6 months ago

Mark,

I’m sure you have seen this site as well, but also a top site for Paleo eating ways (including meat)
http://paleodiet.com/

trackback

[…] for grass-fed meat options — Mark’s Daily […]

Migraineur
8 years 6 months ago
Tracy wrote: “No cow is ‘happy’ who will be slaughtered for her flesh.” The fact that you refer to beef cattle as female betrays your ignorance of animals. The vast majority of bovines slaughtered for their flesh are steers, which are castrated males. I think people who claim to speak for animals ought to at least know a little something about them; otherwise, how can you claim to know what constitutes animal happiness? Otherwise, you slip into sentimental anthropomorphizing: what might make you happy is no guarantee of happiness for a bovine. Judy wrote: “That’s also why the argument that… Read more »
Judy
Judy
8 years 6 months ago
Migraineur: As for animals dying in vain being killed by a combine, okay, maybe so, but yes, they do go back to the food chain to feed other animals, vultures, or back into the earth. I’m sure being caught in a combine is not the best way to go, but I can’t imagine a small animal caught in a combine is going to suffer for long. Further, the argument could be made that a lot of animals raised in the typical industrial food chain die in vain as well – “downer” cows, male chicks. And as we all saw in… Read more »
gkadar
gkadar
8 years 6 months ago
Migraineur, Crows and other birds feast on combine ‘kill’. They can hardly wait! I stopped the car by a recent moose kill. A semi had ‘rear ended’ a female moose with instant death as a result. The animal was still warm but the crows had pecked out its one accesible eyeball. That was pretty fast. As re: Whole Foods: I purchased a piece of beef for roasting 2 weeks ago. One of those rolled up jobbies. Note that the raw meat is kept in a glassed in cooler. The attendant (don’t know if he is a ‘butcher’) weighed and wrapped… Read more »
Becky H
Becky H
3 years 4 months ago

Mr. Joel Salatin addressed Whole Foods (as well as humane killing, etc.) his “rant” on Facebook today. Check it out here: https://www.facebook.com/Polyfacefarm?fref=ts

You’ll have to scroll down to find it, since other stuff has been posted since. But it’s definitely worth a read!!

Anna
8 years 6 months ago
Serving good meat on a budget, one of my favorite subjects. I saved money and lots of shopping time for meat by buying a large upright freezer and sourcing meat/poultry from a local “hobby” farm (run by a couple that raises their own food and sells some to defray overhead costs and support their rural life). I buy a lot of the cuts that my source’s other customers don’t want, so they are especially cheap (some of them would have even been thrown out). Check out the local county fair; lots of kids sell their 4-H animals at auction to… Read more »
Curtis
Curtis
2 years 2 months ago

Wow, thank you so much Anna for this comment, very good suggestions!

Anna
8 years 6 months ago

Oh yeah, some of those animals caught in the harvesting machines don’t necessarily get left for the crows and vultures. Some end up pulverized or even whole in that vegetarian plant-based food. Another thing to think about when contemplating buying bagged ready-to-eat produce from big industrial farms/processing companies.

http://www.marlerblog.com/copyvolecsi.pdf

I know, ick. I stay away from bagged, ready to eat produce!

Jaana
Jaana
8 years 6 months ago
Hi Mark, Greetings from Finland, and thanks for a great blog. After reading Cordain’s book “Paleo Diet for Athletes”, I have been rethinking the importance of the omega-distortion problem. The book does actually think that it is a problem, but also offers good statistics about the actual changes. Originally, the (muscle) meat used to have something like 35% of fat as polyunsaturates. Nowadays it has 8-10%. Also, even though the ratio is “wrong”, it is still better than for example in olive oil. Among the old tribes the muscle meat (that is used to measure the values, and we primarily… Read more »
Marc
Marc
8 years 6 months ago

If there’s a Trader Joe’s in your area, check them out, they carry some cuts of New Zealand grass fed beef at very reasonable prices.

Dave C.
8 years 6 months ago
Judy: Ain’t it funny how this works? I’m sitting here in Corpus wishing I had the selection available in San Antonio or Houston! 🙂 Anna: Wow! What a great post. I’ve made progress from where the time I spent in the kitchen was equal to the time it took to pour milk in my cereal, to actually enjoying doing some real prepration. I’ve saved your post in a document file–it’s definitely something I want to investigate. Jaana: Just want to point out that there are some fairly knowledgeable people who take Cordain to task on his analysis of paleo meat.… Read more »
Migraineur
8 years 6 months ago
Judy, I do see your point, and honestly I don’t think we disagree that much. We both agree that it’s ok to eat animals, and that animals should live good lives appropriate to their species. The people I disagree with are the vegans who think we should never exploit animals for food, or for that matter, that it’s even possible to avoid doing so. I’m simply wondering if there is a sort of urban/suburban ignorance of farming behind that mentality. People who don’t know that beef mostly comes from steers clearly don’t know much about farming. I’m just trying to… Read more »
Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago
“The people I disagree with are the vegans who think we should never exploit animals for food, or for that matter, that it’s even possible to avoid doing so.” No, it’s not impossible to avoid harming all animals (or humans) – however, we can survive without the slaughter of 10 billion land animals a year. Half the world survives on a plant based diet – that number is increasing steadily here in the US, Europe, etc. “People who don’t know that beef mostly comes from steers clearly don’t know much about farming” – the SAD (standard American diet) – reports… Read more »
Migraineur
8 years 6 months ago

Old dairy cows are slaughtered, it is true, but I question whether the majority of beef consumed in the US comes from them.

http://www.bennett.com/blog/index.php/archives/2003/12/26/a-very-mad-dairy-cow/

A quote from the above: “Worn-out dairy cows don’t get slaughtered for the steaks you’re going to buy at a restaurant, you can’t buy their meat at Safeway, and you can’t buy hamburgers at McDonald’s or Burgerville made out of them. Their meat goes into processed foods like bologna, sausages, and dog food.”

Migraineur
8 years 6 months ago

P.S. Provoked, why is it OK to kill critters so you can eat soybeans, but it is not OK to kill critters so I can eat meat? I’m not sure I understand your argument.

Mark Sisson
8 years 6 months ago

Anna,

Thank you for the detailed information in your comment. This would make an excellent “guest post” on the main site. I think it’s the kind of real-world information all our readers crave.

Mark Sisson
8 years 6 months ago

Jaana,

Good analysis and worthy of further investigation regarding ratios and sat fat.

You said, “My educated guess would be that the original recommendation might be based on the fear of the saturated fat, even though well disguised.” I think Cordain still has a problem with sat fat. In my opinion, sat fat is far less an issue.

Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago
P.S. Provoked, why is it OK to kill critters so you can eat soybeans, but it is not OK to kill critters so I can eat meat? I’m not sure I understand your argument. I’m not growing the critters (most in horrible conditions) to kill – whatever kritters you refer to aren’t deliberately created for consumption. It is an unavoidable occurance – not 10 billion grown deliberately. It is intent that justifies morality. It’s sad if I accidentally run over a squirrel while driving my car – Much different than breeding squirrels to specifically aim my vehicle at. It’s the… Read more »
Migraineur
8 years 6 months ago

So, Provoked – what if I don’t raise the critters? What if I hunt them?

Anna
8 years 6 months ago
You are welcome, Mark. I tend to get a bit wordy, I know, so I hope you don’t mind that. But I find that when people are really interested in making changes, but don’t understand the mechanisms of how to make it happen (such as sourcing outside the supermarket system), sometimes they need a good example from “someone in the trenches” offering what works for them. I have a similar post up currently on my puny little blog, too (www.againstthegrainblog.com). Other than the change in shopping & cooking techniques, a typical stumbling block is resistance from family members who fear… Read more »
Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago

P.S. – I did say that the dairy cows go to make burgers – not steaks…. McDonald’s only recently changed their suppliers – countless other dairy cows are processed for human food via grocery stores, other burger joints, the USDA school lunch programs, the military, the Indian Reservations, etc. Dog/cat food? All the by-products – not the “meat”….

Anna
8 years 6 months ago

Angus beef burgers are not from ex-dairy cows.

And for those who are willing, it is possible to purchase meat from outside the factory farm system, which I agree is to be avoided for many reasons, included the inhumane living conditions of the animals.

Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago

So, Provoked – what if I don’t raise the critters? What if I hunt them?

I’ve never heard of “accidental/non-deliberate” hunting trip….. They’re planned events aren’t they?

Hunting while sleepwalking – that would be out of your control and unavoidable.

Migraineur
8 years 6 months ago
Oh, I see. I was confused because you said “deliberately created for consumption,” which hunted animals are not. I still don’t understand why my deliberate killing of animals makes me bad, but your deliberate plowing of land for soybeans (and killing animals in the process) does not. The intent argument can be used to rationalize away anything that’s uncomfortable. Someone who eats factory farmed animals can just as easily say that he does not intend for the animals to be held in confinement pens; someone who eats dairy or eggs but not meat can say he doesn’t intend for the… Read more »
George
George
6 years 7 months ago

It’s ok; within a few years we will have in-vitro cloning of meat which will eliminate this issue and point of contention between meat-eaters and vegetarians completely.

Huckleberry
8 years 6 months ago
Nice post. I appreciate that you teach/remind people about the difference between grass-fed and grass-finished meat, and that you brainstorm options for getting access to good meats. Another reason to prioritize good quality meat is to limit the levels of industrial contaminants you ingest. I recently wrote something up about dioxin levels in meat and animal fat, which has been worrying me. This is another situation where good quality matters, although, due to dioxin in soil, water and air, even great quality meats and animal fats can contain concentrated contaminants. I bring this up here because I think it matters… Read more »
Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago
“….deliberate killing of animals makes me bad, but your deliberate plowing of land for soybeans (and killing animals in the process) does not. The intent argument can be used to rationalize away anything that’s uncomfortable.” Well, there is a definate difference in war it’s called “collateral damage” in courts it’s called “manslaughter”. I suppose eventually (if civilization ever progressed enough) most grains and vegetable could be grown hydroponically which would eliminate the need for concentrated land use and accidental killing of animals…. “the SAD (standard American diet) – reports that most don’t consume muscle meets from steers.” Sorry, didn’t make… Read more »
Just My Thoughts
Just My Thoughts
7 years 2 months ago
@Provoked “I suppose eventually (if civilization ever progressed enough) most grains and vegetable could be grown hydroponically which would eliminate the need for concentrated land use and accidental killing of animals….” If civilization ever progressed enough then we would also be growing meat in labs. But that’s not the point; the point is morality is subjective and someone like yourself seems to believe that everyone should hold the same moral standards as yourself (or at the very least similar to yourself). Well sorry but that ain’t the case; every body tends to have their own set of morals and what… Read more »
Migraineur
8 years 6 months ago
“The fundamental difference between our belief systems is that one of us attempts to error on the side of compassion.” If you wonder why omnivores find vegans annoying, it’s because of the vocal minority who make judgmental statements like this. I think that the farmer from whom I buy my pastured chickens shows more compassion to the chicken than the fox who is waiting in the woods to rip it to shreds. And that’s what would happen to that chicken if there were no farmer to protect it. It’s clear we have nothing more to discuss; get in a last… Read more »
Dave C.
8 years 6 months ago

I think that the farmer from whom I buy my pastured chickens shows more compassion to the chicken than the fox who is waiting in the woods to rip it to shreds.

Love it!! :-)(and I have some grass-fed beef on the counter getting getting ready for the cast iron skillet).

Dave

Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago

So we resort and conclude by comparing man to foxes? So be it…. have the last word.

Sonagi
Sonagi
8 years 6 months ago
The fundamental difference between our belief systems is that one of us attempts to error on the side of compassion. Your sense of moral superiority is misguided. Let’s suppose that animal consumption were outlawed. What would happen to all the livestock? Farmers could no longer afford to feed them and would have to release them into the wild, where they would severely disrupt the ecosystem. All living things are destined to die. It’s not like cows, pigs, chickens and other livestock would live forever if we didn’t kill them for food. Humane raising and slaughter of livestock is infinitely better… Read more »
Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago
No dairy….. no animal product clothing…. No medications for 12 years (pre-vegan) have not been sick since – sorry….. What would happen to all the animals? Now, you’re inviting my loveliest of dreams. Firstly, there would be a halt to artificially inseminating and breeding them. I am in favor of population control for all human and non-human animals. I live in Florida – the south is filled with areas that have backyard/urban/sub-urban chickens. Chickens were meant to be wild. The only “problem” animals would be cows & pigs. I’m pretty certain many people such as myself with ample property could/would… Read more »
Donna
Donna
8 years 6 months ago

Some animals kill other animals for food to survivie on, that’s their instict to do so, they’re designed that way.
So, i believe it’s perfectly OK to eat meat.
“My belief” is that i think everyone should include “clean” meat in their diet occasionally. I used to not eat meat, just fish, turkey, chicken. But, recently i started including some meat in my diet, it’s actually GOOD 4 U!
(Just what i believe, but, to each his own)

Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago

So Donna…. just curious – “it’s actually GOOD 4 U” – care to elaborate? I’ve been in and out of books, doctors websites, assorted dietary experts on and off the internet…. have yet to find anything about meat that is not replaceable (most times better) in a plant based diet. Am very receptive to learn differently. Thanks.

Migraineur
8 years 6 months ago
Posting this recommendation for anyone who might be interested – farmer Joel Salatin has a couple of really wonderful books that deal with alternatives to factory farms. The best starting place, I think, is his book, Holy Cows and Hog Heaven, which describes how a farm can produce livestock without resorting to manure lagoons and feedlots. Beware, though, if you are sensitive to criticism – Salatin is blunt, and no one group escapes his critical eye. He is equally likely to point out the foibles (as he sees them) of liberals, conservatives, city people, vegans, producers of factory farmed meat,… Read more »
Anna
8 years 6 months ago
“have yet to find anything about meat that is not replaceable (most times better) in a plant based diet” Really? I am a normal weight, prediabetic person who takes no meds, but can achieve normal glucose levels with a low carb diet. If I eat starches in even moderate amounts, my BG goes into levels that reach into the officially diabetic range, which if sustained long enough, would definitely progress to full-blown diabetes. So what can I eat for protein and still stay healthy? Plant based protein sources are starchy. Beans/legumes? Only in the smallest of portions, more like condiments.… Read more »
Dave C.
8 years 6 months ago

Anna: Just wanted to let you know that I stopped by my public library on the way home and they had a copy of Aidells’ Meat book. It’s mine for two weeks (and I can extend it to six via the computer). Thanks for the tip!!

Anna
8 years 6 months ago
Dave C., I’ve got my eye on Aidell’s pork book next, because I find pork very versatile. But if you really want to get adventurous, consider Fergus Henderson’s or Hugh Fearnley-Whittingsall’s books (British), both of which provide ample ideas for nose-to-tail eating. I didn’t mention it earlier, but I think that making use of as much of the animal as possible is part of honoring the animals whose lives end to nourish ours. Admittedly, much of this is new territory for me though I’ve made a lot of progress already. Just today, I took delivery of a cooler full of… Read more »
Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago

Anna….. ya got me – I’m not a doctor – like my previous post mentioned I haven’t been ill for 12 years since becoming vegan. But, I did Google Vegan Diabetic and was surprised to see that there are many sites that actually encourage experimentations with vegan diets to curtail/eliminate diabetes…. Certainly, you and your doctors know best. I’m so sorry you’re ill. But thanks for reminding me of my own (sometimes taken for granted) good health – Best to you….

Sonagi
Sonagi
8 years 6 months ago
I’m pretty certain many people such as myself with ample property could/would foster many/most. There are countless numbers of sanctuaries – all provide quite well for the animals and exist only on donations – If the government now supports the animal-as-food industries to the tune of 87 billion$/year – perhaps some of that $ could be filtered into the care of animals till their “time”? Nearly a billion of the world’s people suffer from chronic malnutrition, not to mention lack of access to clean drinking water and decent medical care, and you want people and the government to spend money… Read more »
Provoked
Provoked
8 years 6 months ago

Compassion????

“Spiritual progress does demand at some stage that we should cease to kill our fellow creatures for the satisfaction of our bodily wants.” -Gandhi

Water/Gas/Resources?

“Nothing will benefit human health and increase chances for survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet. ” Albert Einstein

Just My Thoughts
Just My Thoughts
7 years 2 months ago
Gandhi said that because he was a Hindu and was influenced by the Hindu belief that every living being has a soul and this soul either transcends to a higher being or a lower being based on its Karma. Albert Einstein although not exactly religious in the dogmatic sense was influenced by Hinduism as well as other eastern philosophies as were many other prominent people of his times. Also; Gandhi ate diary, drank milk, used honey regularly etc – maybe he should have practiced what he preached given your interpretation of his statement Provoked Regardless, someone’s religious outlook or personal… Read more »
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