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    StupidFatHobbit's Avatar
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    Weight training and nonlinear periodization

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    Anyone here using this in your programming? This is when you train across various rep ranges to allow for different kinds of adaption. Say one workout you do sets of five then the next sets of twelve and then the following sets of eight. That kind of thing. Of course you need a calculator/chart to pick your working weights so they are based on the same 1 rep max.

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    Actually the first workout I ever did was 10-8-6 or something like that.

    Bottom line for me was always effort. One in the tank ain't bad, but if I could get two more it was time to move the weight up. I'm not much for calculators in the weight room. Anyway, yeah its a fine idea and there are lots of variations. Like 5-3-1 has the ancillary work in the higher rep zones.

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    I do a bastardized version of 5/3/1. The first week is sets of 5, and the second involves working up to a max single. The first week stresses my body enough for it to adapt and become stronger.
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    Quote Originally Posted by StupidFatHobbit View Post
    Anyone here using this in your programming? This is when you train across various rep ranges to allow for different kinds of adaption. Say one workout you do sets of five then the next sets of twelve and then the following sets of eight. That kind of thing. Of course you need a calculator/chart to pick your working weights so they are based on the same 1 rep max.
    Most intermediate programs use non-linear progressions. Cube, Conjugate, 5/3/1....
    The Champagne of Beards

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    I do sets of five all the time, but some days it's more sets of 5 than others. The more sets of 5, the lighter the weight. It's nice to have a day when the weight isn't so darn heavy and it's nice to have a day when I don't have to kill myself with so much volume. And it keeps my mind off all the stress of thinking every single freaking time I go in there I have to lift more than last time.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    I do sets of five all the time, but some days it's more sets of 5 than others. The more sets of 5, the lighter the weight. It's nice to have a day when the weight isn't so darn heavy and it's nice to have a day when I don't have to kill myself with so much volume. And it keeps my mind off all the stress of thinking every single freaking time I go in there I have to lift more than last time.
    Yeah, you can do sets of 5 and vary the intensity and volume too. Still non-linear.

    I'm going to switch to HLM once I stop hitting PR's on 5/1. I'll squat 3 sets of 5 each session, 3 sessions per week, but at different intensity levels (heavy, light, and medium) and organize my other lifts so that there's one day of all the relatively heavy lifts (heavy squats, bench press, deadlift), one day of light (80% weight squats, press, power cleans) and one day of medium (90% squats, paused deadlifts, heavy weighted dips) each week.
    The Champagne of Beards

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    IMO I think you're trying to over think/engineer your workout. Gaining muscle is an adaptation to the body's perceived survival threat. Getting a tan is an adaptation to survival threat. How easily you tan or how easily you gain muscle is based upon your genetics.

    What matters most in the weight room is effort under load.
    Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott F View Post
    IMO I think you're trying to over think/engineer your workout. Gaining muscle is an adaptation to the body's perceived survival threat. Getting a tan is an adaptation to survival threat. How easily you tan or how easily you gain muscle is based upon your genetics.
    Yeah, and your level of tanning/training advancement.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott F View Post
    What matters most in the weight room is effort under load.
    I agree with this, but you get to a point where you're lifting a significant enough percentage of your genetic potential that you'll overtrain if you overdo the effort every workout. That's one reason why non-linear or undulating linear periodization is useful (and, in some cases, absolutely necessary in order to continue to make progress).
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Yeah, and your level of tanning/training advancement.



    I agree with this, but you get to a point where you're lifting a significant enough percentage of your genetic potential that you'll overtrain if you overdo the effort every workout. That's one reason why non-linear or undulating linear periodization is useful (and, in some cases, absolutely necessary in order to continue to make progress).
    It depends on how often you work out. Myself, I average once to twice per week of weights, tops. Twice is two days in a row and then ~6 days off. If someone is really trying to push their training max then, yeah, occasionally/periodically push up the frequency to shock the body by over-reaching and then give it the down time to recover. But for longevity, over the years, I've watch trainees putting in too much volume from trying to over think (over plan) their weekly/monthly training routines. I used to train using planed personalization. All it really got me was overtrained, and that was probably due to paying more attention to the plan instead of how my body felt (including motivation to keep it up).

    Today I use a primal paradigm to weight training. The body still thinks it's living in the ice age having to fight/struggle for survival. To build muscle I want it to believe it was in a battle for survival. So I hit the weights hard (HIT), and then by eating well send a signal to the body that there's plenty of quality calories (enough animal fat - hunting it good) out in the environment so that it can afford the extra muscle. Biologically, evolutionarily, there is no other reason for your body to put on extra muscle other then as a survival stagey. Muscle costs calories. Like Neckhammer said, Bottom line for me too was always effort [under load]. If I'm overtraining then I'm trying to, consistently, workout too often.
    Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott F View Post
    It depends on how often you work out. Myself, I average once to twice per week of weights, tops. Twice is two days in a row and then ~6 days off. If someone is really trying to push their training max then, yeah, occasionally/periodically push up the frequency to shock the body by over-reaching and then give it the down time to recover. But for longevity, over the years, I've watch trainees putting in too much volume from trying to over think (over plan) their weekly/monthly training routines. I used to train using planed personalization. All it really got me was overtrained, and that was probably due to paying more attention to the plan instead of how my body felt (including motivation to keep it up).

    Today I use a primal paradigm to weight training. The body still thinks it's living in the ice age having to fight/struggle for survival. To build muscle I want it to believe it was in a battle for survival. So I hit the weights hard (HIT), and then by eating well send a signal to the body that there's plenty of quality calories (enough animal fat - hunting it good) out in the environment so that it can afford the extra muscle. Biologically, evolutionarily, there is no other reason for your body to put on extra muscle other then as a survival stagey. Muscle costs calories. Like Neckhammer said, Bottom line for me too was always effort [under load]. If I'm overtraining then I'm trying to, consistently, workout too often.
    Interesting. Who do you think makes faster progress for longer, someone who works out once every 7-14 days, or one who works out 3 times/week according to a paradigm that's as appropriate as possible for his level of training advancement (linear periodization for a novice, undulating or non-linear microcycles for an intermediate, drawn out mesocycles for an advanced lifter)?

    If you don't mind me asking, how much progress have you made since you started working out according to your current regimen?
    The Champagne of Beards

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