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Thread: Milk and Mood page

  1. #1
    Bear's Avatar
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    Milk and Mood

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    I'd read that dairy (milk), because it comes from cows that are often kept pregnant to produce the milk, contains hormones that affect mood. I believe it...because...

    Two weeks ago I quit drinking milk, to deal with a skin issue. The skin issue rapidly began clearing...and simultaneously I felt "calmer", more "centered". So after the two week period, I drank a glass of milk each day for two days. My skin issue stalled in its recovery and began developing again...and I began feeling like an anxious, caged animal. It was not pleasant.

    Given the response of my body, I'm giving up milk for another month...then will re-test to see if the same response occurs. I believe it will, and may decide to stay off milk and forget the test.

    Has anyone else experienced anything similar to this?

    Thanks...Happy Holidays, too!

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    i don't drink milk. the b/f does. we buy milk and cream from a local organic dairy that grass-feeds the cows. if you want to retest milk, i strongly suggest looking for a better source than your supermarket.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

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    I think it's more likely that it's just a side effect of a lactose/casein allergy or sensitivity and not a reaction to hormones from hormone-treated cows.

    Best way to test that would be to get milk from the source, from farmers that you know don't use hormones to stimulate milk production. If you still have that kind of response, it's the milk.
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    Quote Originally Posted by namelesswonder View Post
    I think it's more likely that it's just a side effect of a lactose/casein allergy or sensitivity and not a reaction to hormones from hormone-treated cows.

    Best way to test that would be to get milk from the source, from farmers that you know don't use hormones to stimulate milk production. If you still have that kind of response, it's the milk.
    Can you have a lactose/casein allergy, as you suggest, and experience the symptoms I describe, but no overt digestive symptoms?

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    TBH, bodies are strange and I don't know for sure. I have read about that kind of response around here before though. Allergies/sensitivities manifest in odd ways.
    Journal on depression/anxiety
    Currently trying to figure out WTF to eat (for IBS-C).

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    This is like your 12th topic about milk. You're intolerant, you're probably not white European descent, I suggest you just stop drinking it. Many people over the age of 20, if they're not white(or have some varying degree of mutt mixture genetics) lose their ability to digest lactase beyond the age of 20. Any food that isn't digested properly is going to make you irritable, and will reflect on your skin.

    Lack of biologically active estrogens in commerc... [J Dairy Sci. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI
    Contrary to previous publications, no differences existed in either the behavior or the uterine weights between animals that consumed any milk type and the negative controls. These results demonstrated that none of the commercial milk types that we tested contained biologically significant estrogenic activity.

    Estrone and 17beta-estradiol concentrations in p... [J Dairy Sci. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI
    Some individuals fear that estrogens in dairy products may stimulate growth of estrogen-sensitive cancers in humans. The presence of estrone (E(1)) and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) in raw whole cow's milk has been demonstrated. The objectives of this study were to determine if pasteurization-homogenization affects E(2) concentration in milk and to quantify E(1) and E(2) concentrations in commercially available dairy products. The effects of pasteurization-homogenization were tested by collecting fresh raw milk, followed by pasteurization and homogenization at 1 of 2 homogenization pressures. All treated milks were tested for milk fat globule size, percentages of milk fat and solids, and E(2) concentrations. Estrone and E(2) were quantified from organic or conventional skim, 1%, 2%, and whole milks, as well as half-and-half, cream, and butter samples. Estrone and E(2) were quantified by RIA after organic solvent extractions and chromatography. Pasteurization-homogenization reduced fat globule size, but did not significantly affect E(2), milk fat, or milk solids concentrations. Estrone concentrations averaged 2.9, 4.2, 5.7, 7.9, 20.4, 54.1 pg/mL, and 118.9 pg/g in skim, 1%, 2%, and whole milks, half-and-half, cream, and butter samples, respectively. 17Beta-estradiol concentrations averaged 0.4, 0.6, 0.9, 1.1, 1.9, 6.0 pg/mL, and 15.8 pg/g in skim, 1%, 2%, whole milks, half-and-half, cream, and butter samples, respectively. The amount of fat in milk significantly affected E(1) and E(2) concentrations in milk. Organic and conventional dairy products did not have substantially different concentrations of E(1) and E(2). Compared with information cited in the literature, concentrations of E(1) and E(2) in bovine milk are small relative to endogenous production rates of E(1) and E(2) in humans.

    It's not the milk, it's just you, sorry. Milk makes my skin flawless due to the calcium, progesterone, and traces of thyroid in it. I'm also over 90% Nordic with only minor amounts of Slavic genes, so I, and my family, easily carry the lactase mutation.
    Longing is the agony of the nearness of the distant

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    This is like your 12th topic about milk. You're intolerant, you're probably not white European descent, I suggest you just stop drinking it. Many people over the age of 20, if they're not white(or have some varying degree of mutt mixture genetics) lose their ability to digest lactase beyond the age of 20. Any food that isn't digested properly is going to make you irritable, and will reflect on your skin.

    Lack of biologically active estrogens in commerc... [J Dairy Sci. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI
    Contrary to previous publications, no differences existed in either the behavior or the uterine weights between animals that consumed any milk type and the negative controls. These results demonstrated that none of the commercial milk types that we tested contained biologically significant estrogenic activity.

    Estrone and 17beta-estradiol concentrations in p... [J Dairy Sci. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI
    Some individuals fear that estrogens in dairy products may stimulate growth of estrogen-sensitive cancers in humans. The presence of estrone (E(1)) and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) in raw whole cow's milk has been demonstrated. The objectives of this study were to determine if pasteurization-homogenization affects E(2) concentration in milk and to quantify E(1) and E(2) concentrations in commercially available dairy products. The effects of pasteurization-homogenization were tested by collecting fresh raw milk, followed by pasteurization and homogenization at 1 of 2 homogenization pressures. All treated milks were tested for milk fat globule size, percentages of milk fat and solids, and E(2) concentrations. Estrone and E(2) were quantified from organic or conventional skim, 1%, 2%, and whole milks, as well as half-and-half, cream, and butter samples. Estrone and E(2) were quantified by RIA after organic solvent extractions and chromatography. Pasteurization-homogenization reduced fat globule size, but did not significantly affect E(2), milk fat, or milk solids concentrations. Estrone concentrations averaged 2.9, 4.2, 5.7, 7.9, 20.4, 54.1 pg/mL, and 118.9 pg/g in skim, 1%, 2%, and whole milks, half-and-half, cream, and butter samples, respectively. 17Beta-estradiol concentrations averaged 0.4, 0.6, 0.9, 1.1, 1.9, 6.0 pg/mL, and 15.8 pg/g in skim, 1%, 2%, whole milks, half-and-half, cream, and butter samples, respectively. The amount of fat in milk significantly affected E(1) and E(2) concentrations in milk. Organic and conventional dairy products did not have substantially different concentrations of E(1) and E(2). Compared with information cited in the literature, concentrations of E(1) and E(2) in bovine milk are small relative to endogenous production rates of E(1) and E(2) in humans.

    It's not the milk, it's just you, sorry. Milk makes my skin flawless due to the calcium, progesterone, and traces of thyroid in it. I'm also over 90% Nordic with only minor amounts of Slavic genes, so I, and my family, easily carry the lactase mutation.
    Good for you. "Flawless" skin...wow.

    But you're wrong...I'm of European, white descent.

    Any other theories?

    Twelve posts? Really? You actually counted them? I was seeking help, not approbation...but I'll take your criticism under advisement.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Good for you. "Flawless" skin...wow.

    But you're wrong...I'm of European, white descent.

    Any other theories?

    Twelve posts? Really? You actually counted them? I was seeking help, not approbation...but I'll take your criticism under advisement.
    I'm not criticizing you, just suggesting if you don't tolerate milk(as clearly stated by your posts) to stop drinking it. You can get calcium from many sources like eggshells, or some cheese if you can tolerate that. There are many methods you can use to assess the absorption of lactose in the digestive system such as the lactose tolerance test, and the lactose hydrogen breath test if you feel inclined. If it comes back that you can't tolerate it, then you know, if not, you may have other digestive issues like IBS. T-13910 is the most common allele associated with lactose persistence in white people. You may be some admixture, causing the gene expression to cease, or simply one of the 5% of pure north European white people who don't have lactose persistence.
    Longing is the agony of the nearness of the distant

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    My mother is a full-blooded Swede. I'm the mutt. She can't tolerate the lactose, and I can. Everyone's body is different. I haven't drank milk since beginning to eat the way proposed on MDA, and haven't used whole milk since I was a kid in elementary school. I'm buying whole milk with cream, from a local farmer. My eczema is clearing up, and it's just been a week. It's quite possible you're lactose intolerant.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseB View Post
    My mother is a full-blooded Swede. I'm the mutt. She can't tolerate the lactose, and I can. Everyone's body is different. I haven't drank milk since beginning to eat the way proposed on MDA, and haven't used whole milk since I was a kid in elementary school. I'm buying whole milk with cream, from a local farmer. My eczema is clearing up, and it's just been a week. It's quite possible you're lactose intolerant.
    Denise...this is part of the reason I'm puzzling through this - if I accept lactose intolerance as a cause (I, too, have skin issues), wouldn't I also have digestive issues? Or is it possible to be lactose intolerant and not suffer obvious digestive problems (maybe a little bloat occasionally...)?

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