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Thread: let's talk woodstoves... page 2

  1. #11
    Huarache Gal's Avatar
    Huarache Gal is offline Senior Member
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    Primal Fuel
    We're in Idaho and heat our house with two wood stoves. The living room stove is an airless model (from Sears) that's about 17 years old. We burn poplar (which starts easy and burns hot), pine and elm (which is great to keep things overnight). Our weather isn't usually unbearably cold (30s for a high), but when we dropped below zero a couple weeks ago, we were able to continue with the wood stoves without using the furnace.

  2. #12
    OneDeltaTenTango's Avatar
    OneDeltaTenTango is online now Senior Member
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    Another vote for Morso stoves. We had a small on in a\our old house. Only drawback was small log size (10"). Then bought an older house with a fireplace and put in a Morso fireplace insert. It is warming my feet as I type. I live in Alaska so burn mostly spruce and birch. The Vermonter in me makes burning spruce seem like a sacrilege. Back then and there, we all assumed that anything less than well seasoned hardwoods would immediately cause a chimney fire, burn your house down, and lead to the downfall of civilization as we know it.

  3. #13
    oliviascotland's Avatar
    oliviascotland is offline Senior Member
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    Also live in Scotland and have a Dowling Anvil - Wood Burning and Multi-fuel Stoves from Dowling Stoves. - and have two of their Aztecs on order, one 25kw and one 35kw, as well as a 25kw Sumo. The Aztecs are woodburners only (and we burn oak and beech), but the others will burn just about anything except for petcoke.

  4. #14
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    Greenbeast is offline Senior Member
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    I have a Clearview vision 500, no gas supply here, so that supplies all my heating and hot water (i have a solar thermal panel for summer)

    I use sweet chestnut

    I have only moved here this spring but i'm quite enjoying having to rely on the stove, more work obviously but it's worth it

  5. #15
    lark42's Avatar
    lark42 is offline Senior Member
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    I live in the land of -30C and we've had our Jotul 400 Castine for several years now and it's been superb. I burn birch (hot and clean) and spruce (free). If I had the opportunity to build/remodel, I would put in a much larger stove and use it more to heat the whole house. Due to our floor-plan, though, I mainly use the stove to take the chill off the central living area where we loose heat through too many windows (but love the light!). If I'm not careful, I overheat the house, and have to open windows. Some year I might invest in a fan or 2 to move the air better.

    I start my fires using a 'top-down' method, except I use birch bark instead of the newspaper knots. The f400 is a smaller stove, so this technique works best.

    Stay warm and cozy,

    Lark
    "Unfortunately, humans rely less on instincts and more on culture to determine what they eat" - Marcia Pelchat

  6. #16
    OneDeltaTenTango's Avatar
    OneDeltaTenTango is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by lark42 View Post
    I start my fires using a 'top-down' method, except I use birch bark instead of the newspaper knots. The f400 is a smaller stove, so this technique works best.

    Lark
    Cool. Never heard of top down. I will try it next time I fire the stove up

  7. #17
    TheyCallMeLazarus's Avatar
    TheyCallMeLazarus is offline Senior Member
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    The top down is a great way to start the stove, but it requires a lot of material.....even in the video and in any like it, there are usually 5-6 newspaper sheets used, several fist-fulls of kindling, and then 3-4 1/8 wood pieces. For me, all 3 of those are in limited supply, so I only use a top down if I need a big fire, immediately, and to hell with how much material I use.

    I use a tinderbox method, where I can take 2 pieces of newspaper, a paraffin chip, then surround it with bark pieces (in unlimited supply). It takes a lot of tending in the first 10-15 minutes, but it works and saves material. Then I use a hatchet to wedge shards on top of the burning box and up she goes.

    As for stoves, I am an Avalon stove fan. Jotul stoves are pretty amazing from several fiends that own them, but I can get used Avalon's for half the price. On some of those I feel like I am paying for the name rather than rote performance.
    "They now look to a single and splendid government of an aristocracy, founded on banking institutions, and moneyed incorporations under the guise and cloak of their favored branches of manufactures, commerce and navigation, riding and ruling over the plundered ploughman and beggared yeomanry." - Thomas Jefferson, 1826

  8. #18
    Urban Forager's Avatar
    Urban Forager is online now Senior Member
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    We have a lousy fireplace insert. It never really gets the house that warm. When we first moved in it had a fan and that helped somewhat but it broke a couple of years ago. I wish we could afford to buy a really good insert but I don't see that in the near future, they are so expensive. Hubby thinks if he rigs up some sort of fan it might help.
    Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

  9. #19
    Siobhan's Avatar
    Siobhan is offline Senior Member
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    I have a Morso - love it. Puts out heat like you wouldn't believe. Very easy to start a fire. I burn maple and oak mostly. I am almost unbelievably lucky in that my landlord provides me with free wood. He gathers it on his property and also pulls it out of his cove (I live on the coast of Maine). Apparently wood that has been submerged in water for awhile and then dries out is really good for burning. Also the local boaters and fishermen are very happy to have these large obstacles removed. And he goes around when the power company is trimming and cutting trees to free the lines. He got three large oaks this fall! They will keep me warm next winter.

    I keep a nice bed of ashes on the bottom, place two logs parallel and then one crosswise on top of them. A couple pieces of newspaper or any kind of paper that I might throw away otherwise and boom! I have fire.
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  10. #20
    Noctiluca's Avatar
    Noctiluca is offline Senior Member
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    I finally have a house that has a wood stove! The house is currently in MAJOR DEconstruction mode right now but hopefully soon I'll start putting it back together. Anyhow, by next winter I should get to use the stove! This is an awesome thread BTW!!!

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