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Thread: Need Help Fine Tuning the Kid's Diets page

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    dacec's Avatar
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    Need Help Fine Tuning the Kid's Diets

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    Summer is nearly upon us and I will have three at home all day

    We did a massive diet over haul this year and got rid of loads of crap that we/they used to eat. Both of my girls do pretty well but my son is OBSESSIVELY picky.

    He hates eggs, prefers sour dough toast with cream cheese and or natural (not hydrogenated crap or sugar) peanut butter...used to be pop tarts, Eggo frozen waffles or an occasional bagel.

    He hates cold sandwiches. He will eat a grilled cheese (nice cheddar, no american cheese food crap)
    For lunch at school he takes peanuts (bad, but a little protein) a green apple and a small bag of tortilla or natural style chips.

    Dinners: he love chicken, hates veggies, dislikes but will choke down a small amount of salad, likes artichokes, and homemade fries. Tacos, quesadillas, lasagna, burgers, home made mac & cheese and home made pizza are his faves.

    I started down this path to a healthier diet primarily to get rid of the convenience faux foods, still allowing a few favorites like chips, but choosing brands with the absolute fewest ingredients. Now I find myself here and my Hubby & 19 yr old have gone more primal. My 16 & 7 yr old are much more flexible and eat more meats and veggies. My 14 yr old son is the serious challenge.

    I need a plan to get this child to expand what he eats. Come summer it is a whole new ballgame. I plan to con (force) him into smoothies... that way I can hide nutritional stuff in them, but aside from that I am at a loss. I have never been one to force my kids to eat certain things...I have always been the 'try it and if you really don't like it, you don't have to eat it' mom. Clearly this does not work with my son. He is also very intelligent, he sees the crap that his friends eat and talks about it often, saying that they are going to get diabetes....he gets clean food, but moving onto actually ingesting *nutritional* foods is another story.

    Any advice would be very much appreciated.

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    Bakonator's Avatar
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    Try getting him to read The Primal Blueprint. I was in the same boat. I'm 16, and I wanted to eat healthy. I also thought my friends ate like crap. My mom bought the book, and being interested in nutrition I read it too. That definitely broadened my perspective about foods.

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    cillakat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dacec View Post
    We did a massive diet over haul this year and got rid of loads of crap that we/they used to eat. Both of my girls do pretty well but my son is OBSESSIVELY picky.
    This is almost always a manifestation of zinc deficiency. Over time it becomes a habit, but it starts with a nutritional issue.



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    dacec's Avatar
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    Really? Can you elaborate?

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    A while back, I made primal(ish) "lasagna rollups" using thin crepes made with eggs and coconut flour and milk. I filled them with ricotta, mozarella, paremsean, and Italian sausage and then poured hot marinara sauce over them. Is that something he'd go for?
    Subduction leads to orogeny

    My blog that I don't update as often as I should: http://primalclimber.blogspot.com/

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    Greensprout's Avatar
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    My teenage sons (13 & 15) love meatza, eggs, bacon, meat of all sorts, crispy skinned chicken, coconut pancakes (the older one anyway), veg stirfried in coconut oil, many steamed veg with butter & dill. The younger is still very into bread, pasta and cereal, but I'm trying to make good meals and have lots of fresh veg and fruits cut/peeled and ready to eat. They snack on boiled eggs if I have them made, also nuts and pepperoni sticks. Baby steps for now. I'm hoping eventually they'll follow more as time goes on and I have lots of good alternatives for them.

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    Autumn's Avatar
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    The ‘try it and you might like it’ mom syndrome is common. I was like that too. But a case like yours made me switch to a tactic that is going to make me sound like I’m a drill sergeant and cruel to children but then again I was raised by a seal.

    Picky? The word doesn’t exist! It’s that easy (theoretically, then comes the mother gene that wants everything in life to be easy on our children)

    When my son was 4 and had been away for a week at my mother’s house for a vacation he could only eat pasta with ketchup. I tried everything and for 3 weeks we only served wok food. He hated everything sans pasta with ketchup. So I decided that since I can eat EVERYTHING, even though I dislike it a bit, I changed tactics. I did as my father did when my twin sister and I were my son’s age. “Finish your food before you leave the table.” So my husband and I stayed at the table at least half an hour after we had finished, and then we cleared it. But not his food. He was left alone in the kitchen with cold, sticky food until bedtime. After 3 or 4 days he ate everything! To this day (he’s 7) he’ll only wrinkle his nose a couple of times but he’ll eat it. Introducing new food is no longer a problem and the only times he shows that “pasta and ketchup is the only way” mentality is when he has been on sleepovers with a particularly picky and spoiled kid from his class. But I found a good way around that one – I just make his favorite healthy food for two days and he’s over that spoiled-bug. But if he likes it he’ll try and make everybody else try it – even pig hearts (his favorite), dandelion salad, birch twig as forest trip candy and raw garlic! His mother even asked us how we made her picky kid eat this kind of food. Easy, his friend does.

    Autumn

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    cillakat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Autumn View Post
    Picky? The word doesn’t exist! It’s that easy (theoretically, then comes the mother gene that wants everything in life to be easy on our children)
    Ditto. If there was difficulty eating 'x' food, they'd be given that first (kale or whatever veggies i was serving), then meat then after sufficiently eating that, they'd get whatever else - quinoa, potatoes etc.

    When eating moved toward the picky - and it always did after vacations, school lunch introduction etc, I'd stick with the 'after you finish this, you may have this".

    I still get a lot of resistance to fish but they have to eat it - at least a few bites. It's not uncommon to hear me say "that's alright, you don't have to like it, you only have to eat it. This is it for (insert meal here)"
    Last edited by cillakat; 06-13-2010 at 01:59 AM.



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    Anorexia can mean two different things
    1)as a *symptom* is simply indicates that there is no or low appetite
    2)the eating disorder anorexia nervosa.

    Two VERY different things though both seem to be tied in with zinc deficiency. One can have anorexia as a symptom without having the eating disorder.

    I'm using this wikipedia article rather than journal cites as it just makes for an easier read...but there is no shortage of journal cites to be found via google scholar or pubmed.

    Zinc deficiency often starts in toddlers and then due to restricted eating, sticks around....tastes get 'set' and become a habit. When T production ramps up during puberty in boys, zinc needs *dramatically* increase. A huge amount of zinc in a male body is used in the production of sex hormones - make dietary/supplental zind a priority for men from puberty on.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zinc_deficiency#Anorexia

    Zinc deficiency may cause a decrease in appetite which can degenerate into anorexia or anorexia nervosa.[citation needed] Appetite disorders, in turn, cause malnutrition and, notably, inadequate zinc intake. Anorexia itself is a cause of zinc deficiency, thus leading to a vicious cycle: the worsening of anorexia worsens the zinc deficiency. The use of zinc in the treatment of anorexia has been advocated since 1979 by Bakan. At least 15 trials showed that zinc improved weight gain in anorexia. A 1994 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial showed that zinc (14 mg per day) doubled the rate of body mass increase in the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN). Deficiency of other nutrients such as tyrosine and tryptophan (precursors of the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine and serotonin, respectively), as well as vitamin B1 (thiamine) could contribute to this phenomenon of malnutrition-induced malnutrition.[14]
    [edit] Cognitive and motor function impairment

    Cognitive and motor function may also be impaired in zinc deficient children. Zinc deficiency can interfere with many organ systems especially when it occurs during a time of rapid growth and development when nutritional needs are high, such as during infancy.[15] In animal studies, rats who were deprived of zinc during early fetal development exhibited increased emotionality, poor memory, and abnormal response to stress which interfered with performance in learning situations.[16] Zinc deprivation in monkeys showed that zinc deficient animals were emotionally less mature, and also had cognitive deficits indicated by their difficulty in retaining previously learned problems and in learning new problems.[16] Human observational studies show weaker results. Low maternal zinc status has been associated with less attention during the neonatal period and worse motor functioning.[17] In some studies, supplementation has been associated with motor development in very low birth weight infants and more vigorous and functional activity in infants and toddlers.[17]



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    dacec's Avatar
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    Wow, thank you so much for the great feedback. Autumn and Cillakat, your were particularly helpful!

    I had an idea last night that I think will really help, in conjunction with learning to say " that's alright, you don't have to like it, you only have to eat it. This is it for (insert meal here)".....I am going to teach him to enter what he eats into Fitday.com (anyone have a better one?) so that he can see how his diet is malnourishing him. I think that will make the actual *eating* of healthier foods a little easier for him, you know when he sees the bigger reason in black and white.

    I also liked the suggestion of having him read the book....which I don't own. Perhaps it is time to buy it

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