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Thread: Personal trainer - How long? page

  1. #1
    Waterlily's Avatar
    Waterlily is offline Senior Member
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    Personal trainer - How long?

    Primal Fuel
    I'm about to do the plunge to commit to a gym and get stronger. I can't believe this will happen! I got a one month membership at a gym as a teacher's gift! One of my student's mom works there and toughed it would be a great gift. Wow!

    I will make time and do this. I need to do it to keep healthy bones. I'm scared and can't wait at the same time!

    I will pay for a personal trainer to learn how to lift, so here's my question: How many hours do you think I need to learn the basics?
    Paleo since April 2013 for health reasons.

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    quikky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterlily View Post
    I will pay for a personal trainer to learn how to lift, so here's my question: How many hours do you think I need to learn the basics?
    1. Educate yourself on lifting. There are many, many horrible trainers out there, especially if you're getting one from a big commercial gym.
    2. Realize that in terms of time, many have a conflict of interest. Do they teach you what you need to know and send you on your way, or do they teach you such that you always need them and keep paying them?
    3. It takes 2.32 hours to learn how to lift from a trainer.

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    OneDeltaTenTango's Avatar
    OneDeltaTenTango is offline Senior Member
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    I did 8 1-hour sessions with a trainer last spring to dial in lifting form. The trainer was very form focused and I thought quite good. 8 hrs was sufficient for me to feel confident to move forward on my own. I also supplemented that with a book (starting strength) and time on youtube

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    Iron Will's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    1. Educate yourself on lifting. There are many, many horrible trainers out there, especially if you're getting one from a big commercial gym.
    2. Realize that in terms of time, many have a conflict of interest. Do they teach you what you need to know and send you on your way, or do they teach you such that you always need them and keep paying them?
    3. It takes 2.32 hours to learn how to lift from a trainer.
    As a personal trainer from a commercial gym I have to completely agree. Do your research then find the oldest trainer a the gym (that would be me) and ask them. It's still only a possibility that they know what they're talking about but your chances will be better.

    On a side note I could teach you in 2.27 hours. Beat ya quikky! :P

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    Waterlily's Avatar
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    Thanks!

    The mom who gave me the membership works there and referred me someone she thinks is good. It's a reputable gym. I used to be a member there and loved it.

    What is 2.27 hours? Two hours and 27 minutes???

    My biggest fear is to get hurt. I'm just a short, small frame lady and I don't want to get it wrong and hurt my back or anything else. Lifting heavy really does scare me for injuries. I've never suffered a sport's injury before and don't intend to. The mom who referred me someone knows me and what I need. She said that guy has been working with the gym for a long time and is very good. I'll see. If I get a bad impression, I'll ask for someone else. I will educate myself as much as I can before I start. Too bad I don't know anyone who does weight training.
    Paleo since April 2013 for health reasons.

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    JimenyKrickets's Avatar
    JimenyKrickets is offline Senior Member
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    If time is a variable and you feel you need a teacher, I would ask your trainer to focus on just compound lifts and not worry about isolation exercises. You are going to get the most bang for the buck with compound lifts when you are just starting out.

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    Al_Kavadlo's Avatar
    Al_Kavadlo is offline Senior Member
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    Why not just start with the first session and take it from there?
    "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

    "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

    My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com


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    Iron Will's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterlily View Post
    Thanks!

    The mom who gave me the membership works there and referred me someone she thinks is good. It's a reputable gym. I used to be a member there and loved it.

    What is 2.27 hours? Two hours and 27 minutes???

    My biggest fear is to get hurt. I'm just a short, small frame lady and I don't want to get it wrong and hurt my back or anything else. Lifting heavy really does scare me for injuries. I've never suffered a sport's injury before and don't intend to. The mom who referred me someone knows me and what I need. She said that guy has been working with the gym for a long time and is very good. I'll see. If I get a bad impression, I'll ask for someone else. I will educate myself as much as I can before I start. Too bad I don't know anyone who does weight training.
    All jest aside I would recommend that you interview your potential trainer. Find out what sort of qualifications they have and ask to talk to some of their current clients to see how they feel about him/her. Think about it like you're buy a car or another big ticket item. Your body and health are extremely valuable.

    As for time involved that really does depend on you and your current level of fitness as well as your goals. I've got clients that I've had for 2 years and am still teaching them new things about how they move. As for basics someone recommended 8 sessions and I would recommend around the same. That way you have a chance to learn X movement go practice it then come back for more questions and a refresher.

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    quikky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterlily View Post
    The mom who gave me the membership works there and referred me someone she thinks is good. It's a reputable gym. I used to be a member there and loved it.
    Again, I really recommend you educate yourself on lifting first. No offense to the mom, but is she knowledgeable enough about lifting to make a judgement on the quality of the trainer? If you don't know how to lift, and someone is teaching you how to, how do you know, without some background knowledge, that what they are telling you is correct? Any trainer can seem good to someone with no experience.

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterlily View Post
    What is 2.27 hours? Two hours and 27 minutes???
    I was just joking. The point is there is no way to predict how much time you will need. It all depends on what you want to learn, how quickly you learn, and how good the trainer is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterlily View Post
    My biggest fear is to get hurt. I'm just a short, small frame lady and I don't want to get it wrong and hurt my back or anything else. Lifting heavy really does scare me for injuries. I've never suffered a sport's injury before and don't intend to. The mom who referred me someone knows me and what I need. She said that guy has been working with the gym for a long time and is very good. I'll see. If I get a bad impression, I'll ask for someone else. I will educate myself as much as I can before I start. Too bad I don't know anyone who does weight training.
    You would be surprised what kind of crap a lot of the trainers teach. There was an older guy (60+) at my gym who came up to the squat rack next to mine. He obviously had no idea what he was doing. A trainer came up to him, and told him to do the following:

    - Put plates under his heels (he was wearing running shoes, by the way)
    - Keep his feet close together, narrower than shoulder width
    - Keep the feet pointing straight
    - Look at the ceiling as he squats
    - Squat above parallel

    You should do enough reading on your own to know that all of the above points are horrible advice. Definitely educate yourself. I cannot overstate that fact.

  10. #10
    edennperez1's Avatar
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    Once you've met with the trainer, try and remember everything he said/did. Report back here and see what these wise folks have to say. The advice that has been given here is stupendous (educate yourself, Starting Strength, interview, etc). Please follow it. Your caution about getting hurt is very real.

    On another note, good for you making this commitment. Find the right trainer and get the right tools, and you're gonna soar!! ;-)

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