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    sbhikes's Avatar
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    Is perpetual training hard on the body?

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    Every Monday I do some squats and presses and deadlifts and am sore until about Thursday when I do some more squats and presses and then I'm sore until about Monday when I do it all again. Isn't it stressful to live in this perpetual state of training, constantly ripping your flesh apart to build new flesh only to rip it apart again? Does this shorten your telomoeres or anything like that, make you age at the same time it's providing a sort of fountain of youth effect?
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Heaviest squat: 180 x 2. Heaviest Deadlift: 230 x 2

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    I don't know about any telomeres, but I know that muscle mass has a lot of benefits, and it's awesomer to be strong than not to be strong. I also think deloads are a necessary evil for anybody but a novice doing a linear progression. These are good times to schedule vacations, deaths in the family, or anything else that's hard to work into your training schedule.
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    I don’t care of telomeres or whatever as long as I feel great and recover from my workouts with plenty of energy for other tasks in life! I enjoy train or exercise twice a day most of the weekdays and today I am just a little sore after a grueling lifting session yesterday! Train more, eat well and recover better I say…

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    miata's Avatar
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    You may need more time to recover. Try a week? Sleep is also very important for recovery.

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    It's been proven that some muscle damage can as long as a few weeks to fully recover. If you consider damage to our outer tissue(skin)and think how long a cut can take to form new skin. Now consider the theory that our skin is designed to heal faster than our internal tissue so as to stop infection with it being so exposed to the external bacteria and such like. There is no reason that muscle tissue should heal any faster than our skin and in truth it probably takes much longer.
    I work each body part every 8 days and although there is bound to be a slight carryover from body part to body part,it is not overly significant.

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    It's a great question and I dont have a scientific answer. I think it is possible to do too much of just about anything though. And by that I mean sometimes we should probably have more rest between sessions but I also mean some take the whole thing to an extreme. They are on an infinite quest for size and strength gains. I would have to believe that at some point you hit a ceiling and it may not be great for your body. At the same time, I suspect that over doing a healthful thing is still better than over doing an unhealthy thing.

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    I left heavy weights 2-3 times a week working at increasing weight but actually going up VERY slowly. The only time I am sore is if I take some time off for vacation or whatever and then it is only mildness in pecs and quads. I feel like you should not be sore like you are all the time. Not sure who you would see to figure out why though. Would you still be sore if you dropped back on the weight and just did a very light day? Maybe you are pushing too hard to fast. My last trainer suggested I should be doing a light day (65% max) and medium day (75% max) and a heavy day (85-95% max) or thereabouts, not just lifting as heavy as possible all the time. The lighter days are used for form and more reps. Just some thoughts for you.

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    OldSchhool's Avatar
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    Muscles take between 4-7 days to fully recover from a workout and another 2-3 days for over-compensation to take place. It can also take up to 7-14 days for the neuro - muscular system to fully recover from a high intensity strength training session.
    A Strength Training Tip: Muscle Recovery

    This week my leg session consisted of 3 total sets and I was sore, my back workout was also 3 sets and resulted in soreness. Most people are performing way too much volume and way too frequently.
    Last edited by OldSchhool; 12-17-2013 at 10:01 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by snoops View Post
    I left heavy weights 2-3 times a week working at increasing weight but actually going up VERY slowly. The only time I am sore is if I take some time off for vacation or whatever and then it is only mildness in pecs and quads. I feel like you should not be sore like you are all the time. Not sure who you would see to figure out why though. Would you still be sore if you dropped back on the weight and just did a very light day? Maybe you are pushing too hard to fast. My last trainer suggested I should be doing a light day (65% max) and medium day (75% max) and a heavy day (85-95% max) or thereabouts, not just lifting as heavy as possible all the time. The lighter days are used for form and more reps. Just some thoughts for you.
    Your trainer sound like a vise guy...

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    sbhikes's Avatar
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    I guess my question is more along the lines of how healthy is it to remain in a state of perpetual training, where you are always creating the training stress and recovering from it. Is it healthy to do this forever? For a few years? How long? Does anyone know?
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Heaviest squat: 180 x 2. Heaviest Deadlift: 230 x 2

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