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Thread: Should drugs be legalized? page 2

  1. #11
    Jefferson1775's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    Indeed. There was at least 10 percent of the nation addicted to morphine after the civil war, and they functioned and contributed to society, because they could be "addicted" while being law abiding citizens and not be in financial ruin at the same time. I'm "addicted" to the so called most addictive substance on the planet, nicotine, and I am a functioning member of society, while drug addicts are not. The reason is: I can afford my pack of cigarettes a day because it is legal, by comparison, cheap, whereas a drug addict can't live a normal life because all their money(or by doing other nefarious activities) is necessary to acquire their fix.
    That's true. Honestly, I drink like a fish and still get a lot done. I have no interest in other drugs but also have no problem with their legalization.
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  2. #12
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    If the government can say what substances you cannot put into your body, how long before they say what substances you are legally required to put into your body? Will statins and anti-obesity pills be required because of some federal "War on obesity"? I don't think this is such a stretch to imagine. The freedoms lost because of the "War on drugs" are only overshadowed by the freedoms lost because of the "War on terror".

    Yes, drugs should be legalized. The government, nor anyone else, should have any say-so over what substances I do or do not put into my body.
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  3. #13
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    Umm HISTORY!!!
    Drugs became illegal AFTER alcohol became legal again. They had all these cops with nothing to do.
    Australia jumped on the band wagon cause America said we won't be friends if you don't do it.
    Heron was still used in the 60s as a birthing drug (apparently you need to have it a couple of times to become addicted)

  4. #14
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    law enforcement against prohibition. I remember hearing about these guys years ago. they raise some interesting points
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    In our town some teen boys were doing shrooms, and one separated from the group. No one looked for him and he almost died from hypothermia in the woods.

    Meanwhile, some 30 yr. old dealer dropped some off for my son in my mailbox. I arrested his azz and now he is on probation for 2 years or gets a two year sentence. (He was so arrogant and stupid that he SHOULD be in jail for getting caught by a mom!)

    Sadly, some drugs can kill you, and I do not want my kids messing with that crap.

    I do believe in the conspiracy theory that societies "undesirables" will go to jail, just as planned, to be part of the grand machine. Told son he will NOT be some cautionary tale (tall, blonde, great student, national athlete, great news story if he gets into that world).

    I understand the arguments, but let's keep it all illegal for the kiddies until their brains stop forming (26 for boys). Sorry for the mother's rant.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psychicsinlove View Post
    In our town some teen boys were doing shrooms, and one separated from the group. No one looked for him and he almost died from hypothermia in the woods.

    Meanwhile, some 30 yr. old dealer dropped some off for my son in my mailbox. I arrested his azz and now he is on probation for 2 years or gets a two year sentence. (He was so arrogant and stupid that he SHOULD be in jail for getting caught by a mom!)

    Sadly, some drugs can kill you, and I do not want my kids messing with that crap.

    I do believe in the conspiracy theory that societies "undesirables" will go to jail, just as planned, to be part of the grand machine. Told son he will NOT be some cautionary tale (tall, blonde, great student, national athlete, great news story if he gets into that world).

    I understand the arguments, but let's keep it all illegal for the kiddies until their brains stop forming (26 for boys). Sorry for the mother's rant.
    so you had the dealer who delivers arrested? now your son is going to do them anyway. except he's going to have to drive to a shady part of town to get them. nice...
    I have a lot of hard miles on my body from before I realized I'm not 100% invulnerable. Now I just think I'm 75% invulnerable. -Mr. Anthony

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  7. #17
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    The war on drugs is mostly a war on poor and brown/black people. The war on drugs is just an excuse to lock them away. It's a proxy for another larger power imbalance that wages war on the vast majority of us in one way or another.
    Yes and no.... in many ways, The Drug War is a fundraiser for state governments. Yes, black and brown people get locked up, because they can't pay. They REALLY love catching affluent white people. Long story, but my SO was caught with a dozen pot plants. The max penalty was like 12 years. He ended up given the option to PAY to go to drug treatment (it was a couple thousand dollars to be told once a week for 10 weeks that drugs are bad and can give you STD's....). Then the tax bill came. It was $12,000, and due in 6 weeks OR our home would be confiscated.

    So by having pot illegal, our state made close to $15,000 off of us. An attorney made $5000 off of us. A social worker has a job providing info on why not to use drugs. 2 guys in NC have a job collecting drug taxes, as well as a lot of cops.

    Now keep in mind, we were small potatoes and not dealers and an accidental catch. Imagine how much money is made off of more productive dealers and growers. Black people just can't quite afford to play the game, that requires $5000 for an attorney and then a couple thousand for treatment. If they could they wouldn't be in jail either.

    But an awful lot of people benefit from the loop of illegal drugs and would be cut out if they became legal. Haha, a friend of mine works for the local alcohol board and asked a class of black high school kids how they felt about drug legalization. One stood up and said "I'd be out of a job".

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  8. #18
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    I understand the arguments, but let's keep it all illegal for the kiddies until their brains stop forming (26 for boys). Sorry for the mother's rant.
    Please, be a parent. Not my job to patrol what your kid puts in his body.

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    That is a myth, not on the rug. Most kids don't go to "the shady part of town" (there are cell phones and computers now) LOL. After my son and his friends (and the friends' parents) saw me take a stand, the energy and situation shifted dramatically.

    My son knows that:

    1. He's "not good for the dealers". That he is not smart enough to get away with doing something stupid.

    2. My word is my bond. My property is my own. He is my child. End of story.

    3. His friend group changed dramatically. They shaped up or shipped out.

    4. It gave the parents of the social group permission to be active parents and reclaim their kid/property/town/life back

    5. The energy in the house is completely different. From natural maturity (he's growing up), respect, focusing on other things. In our house it's like The Mafia meets The Lion King. The rebelling via drug thing ~ not worth it. There is more to life!

    Once another adult goes on my property and gives substances my kid, it's ON and OVER for them. Sorry. No shady part of town left for them until I'm through with parenting.
    Last edited by Psychicsinlove; 12-10-2013 at 07:06 AM.

  10. #20
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    I am a parent, but then I get criticized when I "patrol what my kid puts in his body" that my kid will now "go to a shady part of town". See the paradox?
    Last edited by Psychicsinlove; 12-10-2013 at 07:03 AM.

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