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Thread: Killing Your Own Meat? page 2

  1. #11
    Greensprout's Avatar
    Greensprout is offline Senior Member
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    As a kid I yearly helped with chicken butchering. Later as a teen, was involved a number of times with moose, deer, pigs, a couple of cows and lambs. One time I took a turn at the killing part with a chicken...lets just say it was not a clean swing of the axe and I felt rather bad (for a few minutes, anyway). A few years ago on a survival course we were in pairs and had to kill and clean a rabbit to eat. I volunteered to do the skinning/cleaning so my partner was the one who had to bop the bunny with the big club of wood. I felt I had the 'easier' part.

    In the end, I don't really relish the killing part, but can do it if I had to (though I think different when I see the flea ridden neighbourhood rabbits nibbling on my garden). It's good to be familiar with where our food really comes from, rather than knowing meat simply as something sterile that comes on a styrofoam tray covered in plastic or on butcher paper. That's how my husband likes his meat, and he has no desire to be more intimately aware of any details. That said, we have ordered some grass fed meat that we will probably be going out to the farm raising it to pick up, so we can visit the animals and see how they are brought up. Looking forward to it.

  2. #12
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    I grew up in a hunting family too. My Dad taught me how to clean fish and birds. I have harvested fish, deer, partridge, and turkey (nice one a couple of weeks ago). I am grateful for the meat and feel thankful for the opportunity that is provided and don't necessarily relish the killing part. I take great care in being properly prepared to make a humane kill, I owe it to the game I hunt. I respect the animals that are taken and try to use as much of the animal as I can so as not to waste any of the "gift".
    You'll never see the light if you're in someone else's shadow, or said another way, life is like a dog sled team, if you're not the lead dog, the scenery never changes

  3. #13
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    My husband and I along with our 5 kids raise our own cows (dairy and beef), pigs, goats (not for meat), sheep and chickens. We do all our own butchering. It is not always easy but over the years I've become very uncomfortable eating any meat we didn't raise.

    I've done the killing myself before but generally I leave that to my husband who does it because we need to - not because he enjoys it. I remember the first pig he did....not a great experience for him but it's become a lot more "you gotta do what...." for us since then. We also hunt in season.

    We decided to provide a caring and healthy home for our animals and we serve them daily - until they serve us. I sleep well knowing we take excellent care of our animals and feed them the way they were meant to be fed and their lives serve my family and provide excellent nutrition for me and my children. I also know they are treated humanely both in their lives and their deaths are humane

    The first time or times are always the hardest but it becomes easier.

  4. #14
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    I remember when I was young, I would always go to this catfish farm (we were young, catching something every two seconds is way more exciting at that age) with my great uncle, cousin, and my father. One time, when we took our fish to have them skinned by the owner, she tossed the organs and skin on the ground for her dog and a bunch of kittens to eat. Almost all the kittens knew to stand back and wait for the dog to get his fill first, except one... the cat walked up and in no less than a millisecond the dog snapped and killed the cat faster than I could imagine. It was the first time I saw death happen in front of me. That's when I learned the brutal lesson of how nature truly operates, and how "wild" it really is. I now don't have an issue with killing animals, but I also find it to be a humbling and emotional experience. Now, when I look back on that moment, I can't help but think about the similar ideas in "The Heart of Darkness".


    Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free
    Silhouetted by the sea, circled by the circus sands
    With all memory and fate driven deep beneath the waves
    Let me forget about today until tomorrow

    MY PRIMAL JOURNAL
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stabby View Post
    Pretty fine with it. I'll try to kill and eat the local rabbits but they're faster than I am so I stopped trying. It's kind of irritating how these days if you try to stab bunny rabbits in the head all of the bleeding heart hippie vegetarians think you're some monster when you're just being yourself and trying to have a more delicious life. In my eyes humanity has supremacy over the less contemplative and self-conscious species and while I don't like to see an animal suffer, that is simply a mis-firing of evolutionarily cognitive adaptation that originally held true for humans and for a good reason, because humans need to treat each other well or else humans make life worse for the rest of humanity and themselves . I'm fine with who I am, I don't need to seize every single damn opportunity to be caring and compassionate to every single insignificant entity on the planet so I can feel smug about the value system that I have arbitrarily adopted and followed. Killing and eating animals makes life better for humans and I encourage every human who loves to kill and eat animals to kill and eat as many as you can and grow stronger. And make sure to share with your fellow humans so that we may all benefit and grow stronger and happier as a community.

    Maybe I need a bow or something.
    One of the smartest, most illuminating things Ive ever read about food and eating. +1

  6. #16
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    Just a tip for those of you with chicken necks on the chopping block. The best way to do that is to mount a large metal funnel to a post or wall about five feet off the ground with the narrow side down. Have a bucket below the funnel. Gently place your bird head first into the funnel and pull the head through. It will generally just pop out. Neck exposed. Firmly hold the head pulling down with a little pressure and ne clean swipe with a razor sharp knife removes the head and bleeds the bird into the bucket. No misfiring. No running around with heads chopped off. Very simple. I've done twenty in a couple minutes like this. Others were plucking and cleaning thankfully.

    I've done a lot of bird hunting and fishing in my life. Killing, cleaning and eating either is about the same as picking, cleaning and eating zucchini.

    Field dressing a big buck is definitely a different experience. It is a little disgusting, a little emotional, and perhaps even spiritual. I think everyone who eats a lot of wild game should make that first incision from the genitals to the sternum at least once. Open him up and turn him on his side so the guts spill out. Then give the knife to a master and pay very close attention to the handling of the intestines, bowels, bladder, and rectum. Learn to cut the fat away and remove the heart and lungs in one clean tidy piece. Done right it is a respectful harvest. Done wrong can be a smelly mess that spoils the meat.

    I joked about harvesting a wild burro in the eat a horse thread, but when I seriously considered it, I really didn't want to field dress a donkey in 100 degree weather, drag it to my truck and try to set something up in my backyard to butcher the animal. The legality of it didn't bother me as much as the mess and urgency I would have had to deal with to do it right.

    I took a wild boar in Hawaii a few years ago and my guide just carved out the hams, shoulders and loins on the spot leaving the rest of the carcass to the rain forest. That was kind of interesting (no gutting and cleaning), and the best fresh meat I have ever eaten. I asked about the bacon/belly and he said wild boars didn't have bacon. I would like to revisit that notion some day.

  7. #17
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    fyrespryte is offline Senior Member
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    I've been considering this very same dilemma. I've never purposefully killed anything in my life, and I'm an animal lover...but since becoming primal...I don't know...every animal I look at I find myself wondering how it will taste. I found out that these wild ducks that populate our neighborhoods (and are a real pain in the butt) are supposed to be really tasty. I've been wanting to try to catch one...but I'm very unsure about how I'm going to feel about it when it comes right down to it. I'd like to think that I will be able to step up to the plate...like Diana said...if I'm going to be a meat eater then I should be able to kill it.

  8. #18
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    My husband and I are getting the last things set up to breed rabbits for slaughter. When I kill an animal to eat I make sure to use as much of the animal as possible – everything else seems like a waste and too much like the ‘buy and throw away’ mentality that I really don’t like about society.

    I can love and care for an animal while it’s alive and then enjoy it, after I kill it. I think it’s the simple respect for the life and what’s left after life is gone. I could eat my own dog if it was necessary.

    Autumn

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Autumn View Post
    My husband and I are getting the last things set up to breed rabbits for slaughter. When I kill an animal to eat I make sure to use as much of the animal as possible – everything else seems like a waste and too much like the ‘buy and throw away’ mentality that I really don’t like about society.

    I can love and care for an animal while it’s alive and then enjoy it, after I kill it. I think it’s the simple respect for the life and what’s left after life is gone. I could eat my own dog if it was necessary.

    Autumn
    Any left over parts of the animal can be used as fertiliser if you have a garden. Or you could feed them to animals, such as dogs, chickens, turkeys, cats or pigs.

  10. #20
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    A funny saying comes to mind "If god didn't want us to kill animals he wouldn't have made them out of meat". I've hunted and processed my own meat all my life. We have become to far seperated from the rendering process in modern times and hollywood has made us scared of blood. In years past if you didn't kill the animal yourself you didn't eat. My grandmother could ring a chickens neck and have it gutted , scalled and ready to cook before you could start your car to go to the grocer. It's all a part of the process, if your taught properly how to do it , it's very satisfying to render your own sustinance.

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