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Thread: Flours? page

  1. #1
    fyrespryte's Avatar
    fyrespryte is offline Senior Member
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    Flours?

    Primal Fuel
    I have a very large bag of white flour sitting in my freezer that I'd like to get rid of. It's large because we hardly ever use it, there are a few sauces and gravy's that we use it for to thicken. I'm not very well versed on using other types of flour.

    What kinds of flours do you use for what? I've heard of coconut flour and almond flour. I've heard that coconut flour imparts a coconutty flavor though and isn't good for gravy and that almond flour isn't good for heating. Will you tell me about the different types, what they're used for, what they can't be used for? Can any of them be used for baking?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    lil_earthmomma's Avatar
    lil_earthmomma is offline Senior Member
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    Coconut flour makes great muffins, cupcakes, etc. Blanched almond flour makes the best pancakes imo, also good for cakes etc. Great for savory things like crab cakes etc. There are many traditional italian recipes that call for almond flour, so you don't have to try to find a reg recipe and make substitutions.

    As for thickening, neither do the trick for a beautiful gravy.

    Reducing cream and then adding it to the drippings, a splash of red wine and some spices, and then letting it further reduce works, but it will not be a thick thick gravy.

    For thanksgiving/christmas I just use a bit of arrowroot powder.

  3. #3
    Rosegin's Avatar
    Rosegin is offline Senior Member
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    If you have kids you can use your large bag of flour to make salt dough and then make it into ornaments for Christmas. That will help you get rid of it. lol
    ~Sandy


  4. #4
    peril's Avatar
    peril is offline Senior Member
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    In a lot of Indian curries, the gravy is made without grain flour. Almond meal is used in kormas. Other thickeners used are besan (chickpea flour), white poppy seeds and yoghurt. Coconut milk and coconut cream are common in South Asian and South-East Asian curries and produce a very thick gravy when reduced. I often cook a Burmese chicken curry (oddly called chicken curry without gravy) that has nothing but chicken, oil, onion, garlic, ginger and spices yet has the most delicious and thick gravy.

    Remember, the world is full of fantastic foods that don't use undesirable ingredients. It's easier to find those than to find substitutes for undesirables

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