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  1. #1
    Hotmail's Avatar
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    Sauna

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    So what's the deal exactly about Sauna, there are so many conflicting articles on the net, some say it increases metabolism by 20% (if one sits for 30 minutes) some article says it reduces metabolism (don't believe that personally) some say it burns up to 300 calories in 30 minutes, some deny that and say it only burns something like 80to 120 calories for 30 minutes ?? Anyone has links on credible research on this subject?

    (winter here and love me some Sauna )

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    Well, it helps you sweat so it helps your body getting rid of toxins but I don't think there is much truth in changing metabolism.

    logically, the heat will have your body work a bit harder to get the blood and oxygen around. The heat will make your blood a bit thicker and your arteries wider, your heart will work a bit harder thanks to that. I guess you could say that you burn a bit more calories thanks to that. However it will be a minimal change as it's only your heart that is working harder. the other muscles will be affected minimally. If they were Sauna's would be a bad idea for anyone with a chronic disease and a no-go-area for heart patients. (I know there are even health benefits for heart patients in a sauna)

    The fact that you loose weight in a sauna is thanks to the fluids you loose in there. people can loose up to 3 or 4 pound of water due to sweating in a sauna. (I'm not saying that's healthy!)
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    Here you will understand the true meaning of the sauna. Also, it is pronounced "Sow na" not "Saw na" in case you weren't aware. (Everybody says it wrong.)

    BBC News - Why Finland loves saunas
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hotmail View Post
    So what's the deal exactly about Sauna, there are so many conflicting articles on the net, some say it increases metabolism by 20% (if one sits for 30 minutes) some article says it reduces metabolism (don't believe that personally) some say it burns up to 300 calories in 30 minutes, some deny that and say it only burns something like 80to 120 calories for 30 minutes ?? Anyone has links on credible research on this subject?

    (winter here and love me some Sauna )
    Nice way to get clean anyway: the heat is relaxing, and a cold shower in between is invigorating. And many Finns say, plausibly, that sweating is better than a lot of use of soap, which can irritate the skin.

    I think ten to fifteen minutes sweating, followed by a cold shower to cool off, then repeat a second time, is more usually recommended. And drink enough. It's sometimes said that, since it will raise your heart-rate, don't although many gyms have saunas do exercise and then take a sauna, but do one or the other. Maybe ... I don't know anything definite on that, but it sounds plausible. In some countries they put saunas in next to swimming pools that's quite nasty inasmuch as people wander in after swimming for a bit and release chlorine from their swimming costumes into the air. The Finns would blanch.

    Sweat baths of some sort or another, combined with cold plunges or rolling in the snow, would seem to be pretty "primal" practice. Certainly, some North American Indians used them, including some that lived in fairly hot regions such as the Apache.

    You might try googling something like "sweat lodge" for more on that.

    Historically, sweat-baths seem to have receded in Europe with the advance of Christianity. I guess Europe would probably be a lot nastier if it had never been Christianised: I sometimes think that there seems to be little gentleness around in this world except where a society has been touched by either Christianity or Buddhism case in point, Bhutan:

    Fast forward into trouble | World news | The Guardian

    But it has to be said that back in the old days Christians could be very ascetic (as Buddhists can be, too). Washing, and generally keeping yourself clean, was seen as improper luxury by some enthusiasts. (Poor mad Nietzsche had some interesting things to say on the subject.) Possibly there were worries about what naked bathers might get up to with each other, too. At any rate, here, it seems, is the historical reason for the decline of sweat-baths in most of Europe.

    Finland is on the fringe of Europe and was converted very late: this is almost certainly why steam-baths, which were probably pretty much universal at an earlier date, continued to be important there.

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    I swear by steam-room. Not for weight loss, but for prevention of colds and winter blues.
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  7. #7
    Hotmail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lewis View Post
    Nice way to get clean anyway: the heat is relaxing, and a cold shower in between is invigorating. And many Finns say, plausibly, that sweating is better than a lot of use of soap, which can irritate the skin.

    I think ten to fifteen minutes sweating, followed by a cold shower to cool off, then repeat a second time, is more usually recommended. And drink enough. It's sometimes said that, since it will raise your heart-rate, don't — although many gyms have saunas — do exercise and then take a sauna, but do one or the other. Maybe ... I don't know anything definite on that, but it sounds plausible. In some countries they put saunas in next to swimming pools — that's quite nasty inasmuch as people wander in after swimming for a bit and release chlorine from their swimming costumes into the air. The Finns would blanch.

    Sweat baths of some sort or another, combined with cold plunges or rolling in the snow, would seem to be pretty "primal" practice. Certainly, some North American Indians used them, including some that lived in fairly hot regions such as the Apache.

    You might try googling something like "sweat lodge" for more on that.

    Historically, sweat-baths seem to have receded in Europe with the advance of Christianity. I guess Europe would probably be a lot nastier if it had never been Christianised: I sometimes think that there seems to be little gentleness around in this world except where a society has been touched by either Christianity or Buddhism — case in point, Bhutan:

    Fast forward into trouble | World news | The Guardian

    But it has to be said that back in the old days Christians could be very ascetic (as Buddhists can be, too). Washing, and generally keeping yourself clean, was seen as improper luxury by some enthusiasts. (Poor mad Nietzsche had some interesting things to say on the subject.) Possibly there were worries about what naked bathers might get up to with each other, too. At any rate, here, it seems, is the historical reason for the decline of sweat-baths in most of Europe.

    Finland is on the fringe of Europe and was converted very late: this is almost certainly why steam-baths, which were probably pretty much universal at an earlier date, continued to be important there.
    Thanks, very interesting

  8. #8
    Hotmail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    I swear by steam-room. Not for weight loss, but for prevention of colds and winter blues.
    Oooh I agree, my winter workout is usually (when its my day off) Jacuzzi followed by Sauna, followed by shower, rinse and repeat.

    One winter I kept my swimming all the way through it, and always followed it with sauna (yeh I know chlorine released in the sauna lol) even though I left the pool with wet hair in the freezing cold, I felt perfectly warm, and didn't get the flu.

    I never thought of Sauna as weight loss thing, just was googling about its benefits today and saw that many think it burns a lot of calories (Think Dr Oz on Oprah said that), while others are not convinced, so wondered if there are credible research in the are.

  9. #9
    Hotmail's Avatar
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    Oh here is Oprah/Dr Oz on sauna, but its the infrared one, not sure if regular one do the same, the sauna I go to has these blue florescent light tubes for the hear

    Infrared Sauna Dr Oz on Oprah. Why an Infrared Sauna by Heatwave is good for your Health! - YouTube

  10. #10
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    I like the sauna quiet bit, but whats this thign about chlorine and breathing it? I thought when i go for a swim and the sauna to sweat out the chlorine would be good for me as i rid of any absorbed chlorine in the skin as soon as im done with doing my laps etc.

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