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Thread: should we include a little corn and wheat? page

  1. #1
    MarielleGO's Avatar
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    should we include a little corn and wheat?

    Primal Fuel
    I have been reading this book. It's a fantasy book about two people living in the time when humans were still hunter-gatherers but started to introduce small scale agriculture. Like having a few seeds planted next to their hut for food in times when meat and fruits were limited.

    To cut off the immediate response of "Hey it's fantasy!" I know the writer personally and she had researched this quite extensively to make it all fit very nicely with the reality of that time.

    Now in the book they live through a extreme dry spring and as a result there aren't many animals being born, animals die because they don't have grass to eat, gatherers aren't finding much fruits and hunters only manage to kill small animals once every week for the whole tribe.
    In the book one person says that when the traders come they will buy seeds so they can grow a bit more of their own food to ensure a better food supply the next year.

    The research the writer has done is only locally, so north western europe. but it indicated that for quite a while even in hunter-gatherer tribes they used wheat, corn and probably starches as a last resort calorie intake.

    I wondered while I'm triving and feeling really good on no wheat at all and the PB in general, would it be good every now and then to eat a little wheat? not the overly processed stuff but freshly ground untreated flour?
    My story, My thought....

    It's all about trying to stay healthy!!!!

    Calories? Aren't that those little creatures that live in my closet and shrink my clothes at night?
    AN EARTH WARRIOR!!!!

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    Heritage, organic, soaked, sprouted, boiled...sure, on occasion. But not worth the effort and nothing in them we need. So why bother?


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    JoanieL's Avatar
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    If you don't have bad reactions to it, and you keep it to the category of snack, I don't think that the very occasional indulgence in wheat or corn will kill you.

    That said, I think that folks who believe in the whole grain myth are probably hurting themselves. Cereal for breakfast, sandwich for lunch, pasta for supper are poor food choices for the long haul. The occasional corn dog at the county fair ain't no big thing.

    I would encourage you to put things made of wheat or corn into a food tracker to look at their nutritional value. It's pretty much crap.
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    If I understand your post correctly, you are saying that some of our ancestors may have relied on corn and wheat as a last resort food?

    But then why would that have relevance to us when we always have superior choices? Untreated wheat still has gluten. Whole meal still has antinutrients.
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    MarielleGO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMonkey View Post
    If I understand your post correctly, you are saying that some of our ancestors may have relied on corn and wheat as a last resort food?

    But then why would that have relevance to us when we always have superior choices? Untreated wheat still has gluten. Whole meal still has antinutrients.
    I'm not sure if your ancestors are included in that, but the research this writer has done is specifically targetted to an area here in Holland and across the German border.
    She found out about quite a few tribes living there. They found indications that these people used seeds of primal versions of corn (which is very common in holland), wheat and other crops/roots to grow food for when other supplies like fruits, wild veggies and meat weren't available.

    I think mark's research is more focused of the humans who lived a while before that but still our genes has changed a bit since humans settled themselves on the European continent (just look at the color of our skin, that differs from where humanity started in Africa). I wondered if it wouldn't be benefitial for me to eat some sort of freshly grounded untreated wheat every once in a while and only during winter time. (as it is logical that, that was when food was scarce.)
    My story, My thought....

    It's all about trying to stay healthy!!!!

    Calories? Aren't that those little creatures that live in my closet and shrink my clothes at night?
    AN EARTH WARRIOR!!!!

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    Did they ground it into flour or make it into a porridge?

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    MarielleGO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hannakb View Post
    Did they ground it into flour or make it into a porridge?
    I think porridge... I can't imagine making it into flour. But that I have to ask from the writer, I'm not sure
    My story, My thought....

    It's all about trying to stay healthy!!!!

    Calories? Aren't that those little creatures that live in my closet and shrink my clothes at night?
    AN EARTH WARRIOR!!!!

  8. #8
    Hannakb's Avatar
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    My understanding is wheat contains 2 proteins that when it's grounded & water is added they create gluten.
    When your body breaks it back down its one of the proteins that the body attacks (in Celiacs) and the parts of the body that breaks the gluten up.
    So I'm unsure if whole wheat has gluten & if the damage done by gluten would still occur in wheat porridge.

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    I was actually reading a little about what people were eating in my part of the world before farming became prevalent yesterday. So this is Northern Europe. Fruit practically didn't exist. Wild berries did but every year was a "hard year" since the growing season for everything is so short. That means storing items in a way that would make them last for at least 6 months without our modern technology and using foods that you eat could even after they'd been at the bottom of your travel satchel for lord knows how long.
    "Grains", porridges and bread was used. The grains weren't really grains though, but seeds and pods from grasses. Most commonly related to cabbages. These were boiled into a porridge or ground up with berries and mushrooms and baked as a bread or a bun that would not spoil (or go only mildly rancid given the fat content is near zero) and could be used during the winter as such or be soaked and cooked into a stew. A single type of wild nut that still exists was collected during the summer months. The earliest mentions of a grain that would be known to us now, are of (wild) rye, however, it has been often remarked that this did not digest well. Eating large quantities would make you gaseous as hell.

    Saying that, if you really wanted to ad grains to your diet, I'd rather go with rye before anything else.

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    MEversbergII's Avatar
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    Define "corn". I'm fairly certain what we call corn is a new-world crop. Actually, I'm dead certain!

    "Corn" in the old English sense means grain in general, though.

    M.

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