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Thread: should we include a little corn and wheat? page 2

  1. #11
    namelesswonder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    Define "corn". I'm fairly certain what we call corn is a new-world crop. Actually, I'm dead certain!

    "Corn" in the old English sense means grain in general, though.

    M.
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  2. #12
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    should we include a little corn and wheat?

    Ancient wheat and corn are totally not the same as moden wheat and corn. Yeah... Corn as we know it is from the Americas.

    If you want wheat have it, but I don't think this book is the best justification for it.


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  3. #13
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    Corn and potatoes (if that may be the starches referred) were definitely not available in Europe and wheat was not the same as modern day.. It would appear this book you are reading is definitely fantasy...

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    Botany meets archaeology: people and plants in the past

    Potatoes were introduced to Europe in the 16th century. I eat sourdough bread pretty frequently, myself, and corn sometimes.
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    Sprouted grain breads and baked goods are pretty easy to find. These, along with sourdough and other soaked or fermented recipes, would most closely approximate what our ancestors would have eaten.

    I just bought a loaf of sprouted cinnamon raisin bread and made toast with some pumpkin cream cheese I made. Shit was awesome. No noticeable side effects, either.

  6. #16
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    should we include a little corn and wheat?

    Hmmmm. Is sprouted grain/sourdough better than gluten free stuff? I want to try it for my one day a week or so of grain products but I feel like at this point I am sensitive to gluten.


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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisepassion View Post
    Hmmmm. Is sprouted grain/sourdough better than gluten free stuff? I want to try it for my one day a week or so of grain products but I feel like at this point I am sensitive to gluten.


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    You can eat sourdough even with a sensitivity to gluten.
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  8. #18
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    I wondered that myself, but I've never noticed anything serious from eating it occasionally. Might be different if I were to eat it every day, though.

    A lot of the gluten-free stuff is made with weird flours and oils, so I usually try to avoid it. I tried some white rice flour bread a while back -- the ingredients were okay, but it was chewy and tasted pretty awful. Not worth the $5 or $6 I paid for it.

  9. #19
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    The proper sourdough process also degrades some of the gluten if memory serves. The resulting loaf will be more dense as a result.

    M.

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    Would it be good to eat just a bit of corn and wheat?

    No. It would not be good. Nothing is gained by eating a bit of it. You won't be "hardening" yourself to its possible detriments by having some from time to time, and you won't be missing anything nutritionally that you couldn't get in spades elsewhere. So the real question is will it be detrimental to have just a bit from time to time, and to that the answer is a big ole bag of .... it depends.

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