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Thread: Girls as young as 9 going through puberty???? page

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    Iron Will's Avatar
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    Girls as young as 9 going through puberty????

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    So I was on the way to work this morning and heard this stat on the radio. What is happening? I don't have the privilege of having kids of my own yet so I really know nothing about this but that is a really frightening statistic!

    I'm curious to know if this is happening around the world or if this is just a North American concern.

    Is our water and our food source so contaminated with environmental estrogens?

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    Furan's Avatar
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    Same here in France, across the Atlantic Ocean. [when I was a teenager (10 years ago), girls were going through puberty at 11 - 14, but never earlier] .
    As to the reason, I believe as you say that environmental estrogens are too omnipresent.
    Wouldn't be surprised if it came from meat as well.
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    I think it has a lot to do with all the growth and other hormones fed to our food sources as well as things like soy being added to everything including our grooming products. I am sure the actual answer is a little more complex.

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    The most popular "studies" I have heard of were about fish populations, becoming essentially female due to (or in very close correlation ?) environmental estrogens.
    These studies are at least 10 years old.
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    I sort of hit on this in my journal the other day. Give cows bgh so you can get more milk/meat out of them. Then because it makes them sick on a regular basis, give them antibiotics daily. Run ad campaigns like, "Milk, it does a body good," and "Beef - it's what's for dinner." It's a twofer - not only are girls menstruating earlier, but we're creating superbugs that current antibiotics can't handle.

    And there are moobs.
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    It's nothing new, since the 1830's/1840's age of menarche has been dropping. It also varies in different parts of the world. Lots of literature and research exists on it, here is Wiki's bit about it

    Historical shift

    The average age at which the onset of puberty occurs has dropped significantly since the 1840s.[66][67][68] This was dubbed 'the secular trend' by J. M. Tanner. In every decade from 1840 to 1950 there was a drop of four months in the average age of menarche among Western European females. In Norway, girls born in 1840 had their menarche at an average age of 17 years. In France, the average in 1840 was 15.3 years. In England, the average in 1840 was 16.5 years. In Japan the decline happened later and was then more rapid: from 1945 to 1975 in Japan there was a drop of 11 months per decade.

    A 2006 study in Denmark found that puberty, as evidenced by breast development, started at an average age of 9 years and 10 months, a year earlier than when a similar study was done in 1991. Scientists believe the phenomenon could be linked to obesity or exposure to chemicals in the food chain, and is putting girls at greater long-term risk of breast cancer.[
    Last edited by ryanmercer; 11-07-2013 at 10:26 AM.
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    Iron Will's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryanmercer View Post
    It's nothing new, since the 1830's/1840's age of menarche has been dropping. It also differents in various parts of the world. Lots of literature and research exists on it, here is Wiki's bit about it
    .... I don't know what to say. I guess when will changes be made or when will society as a whole want to make changes? When a 4 year old starts developing? The thought is horrifying.

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    I didn't even know it was unusual. I'm 25 and had my first period at 13 1/2. Most of my friends had gotten theirs by then, though I knew some girls who had been as young as 9. I think my sister was "late" like me as well, but she had a friend who didn't get hers until 15 or 16 and that was considered very late. Let me tell you: 9-year-olds are NOT emotionally mature enough to handle it.
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    The SO, if memory serves, got hers at 11 or 12. Years ago I've overheard women talking about their daughters who began around 8-9.

    I don't know how unusual 12 is, as there are political figures in the middle ages who conceive around that time. Henry V's mother, if my memory is serving.

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    I know traditional wisdom is not a very reliable thing on most cases, but when I hit puberty at 11, the nurse in shift at my school just nodded and said that it's more common for heavier girls to start their menses earlier than the lighter ones. And as said, there are some historical cases where very young girls have become pregnant. So I'm inclined to think that even though the hormonal pollution in our water and food undoubtedly play some part (and even a bigger part with actual ailments), the sexual maturity age would be very directly linked with availability of food. Have food, can have loads of healthy babies. No food, best not have babies just yet.

    Obviously not an infallible mechanism, but hormones aren't really known for their philosophical proves.
    Last edited by BrainInABody; 11-07-2013 at 11:51 AM.

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