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Thread: (How) should I quit the pill? page

  1. #1
    fable's Avatar
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    (How) should I quit the pill?

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    Taking hormones is bad and very non-primal. Right?

    But I have a boyfriend and I don't want to get pregnant (yet).

    I have so far chosen to ignore the fact that the pill is probably not good for my health. I know about the risks I am putting myself at, clogged arteries being one of the most serious (and I have friends who have experienced this due to the pill).

    So what do you other primal girls out there do? Is there any chance of quitting the pill without having to choose between celibacy or countless little groklings running around?

    Maybe this topic is addressed elsewhere, in case I would be happy to be redirected!

  2. #2
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    Are the risks that bad? my gf takes it and doesn't want off for fear of pregnancy as well. My biggest concern was thinking over use could lead to her being sterile in the long run but I'm not sure if that actually happens.... I saw it on TV =(

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    I only quit hormonal birth control because it was making me FEEL bad... otherwise I'm sure I'd still be on it and not worrying too much about it. The benefits of controlling my reproductive life far outweigh the risks (as long as you don't smoke, of course - smoking and taking the pill is just ASKING to get sick, IMO).

    Now I have a non-hormonal copper IUD (Paraguard) and couldn't be happier. It's not a good choice if you have really heavy periods or awful cramps. And if you've never given birth, some doctors don't like to insert them, because there's a slightly higher risk of infection or damaging the uterine wall, and a significantly (I think) higher risk of expulsion within the first few months. So it's certainly not for everyone, but I think it's worth considering if you've got a long time before you want to get pregnant (the Paraguard IUD lasts 10 years, the one with hormones, Mirena, lasts 5).

    iniQuity, I haven't read up on it too much, but I don't think that's common at all... a lot of people have trouble getting pregnant for a year or so after stopping the pill, but I think fertility almost always returns eventually.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mayness View Post

    Now I have a non-hormonal copper IUD (Paraguard) and couldn't be happier.
    +1 I strongly recommend this. Keep in mind that it is releasing copper so I like to see folks using it also take 15-30 mg zinc per day but it's really the best option available.

    Generally speaking, horrible cramps are a magnesium and D problem..somestimes calcium and potassium as well. When I'm getting sufficient magnesium, I don't need any motrin at all (wrt to my period)

    Heavy bleeding is also easily treated with a variety of supps or herbs depending on the particular hormonal issue at work.

    One of the best methods is FAM - Fertility Awareness. It's both a charting and a checking method....charting temps, checking cervical fluid and position. If done correctly, and if intercourse is avoided when fertile, it's got pill level reliability. However, for many women and their partners, avoiding penis/vagina sex is just about impossible around ovulation.

    One solution is to use FAM, then when fertile, rely on a barrier method but that requires asking 'will I really do it?' 'will I use it correctly?' 'every time?' diaphragms used correctly (ie with spermacide and left in 'x' amount of time after intercourse) are an ideal barrier method. condoms are less preferred by most but have other obvious benefits.

    Personally, I'd do anything to stay off the pill.

    It's tricky though - there's no easy solution until one is either certain they don't want kids or is certain they're done having kids. Vasectomy is a Very Good Thing.



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    A woman can conceive during only 8 hours in each a cycle. Sperm lives approximately up to 3 days under the right conditions. So … reverse all the ‘when to make a baby’ calendars to ‘only heavy petting allowed’ calendars? Use condoms even though that could become an expensive affair in a steady relationship. Interrupted intercourse reduces risk for pregnancy by 83% (in those 8 hours + sperm lifetime).

    Autumn

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    I use the Mirena IUD. The amount of hormones is quite small compared to the pill (not enough to prevent ovulation, but enough to alleviate the effects of the IUD). I adore it and find it to be a good compromise between completly hormonal and completely non-hormonal methods. I was miserable on strictly hormonal methods, but the non-hormonal methods were either unacceptably risky or too painful for me.

    After 17 years of being on birth control and working my way through various birth control solutions - this has been the absolute best birth control experience I've ever had.

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    Run far far away from the pill.

    I went on the pill when I was 16, went off when I was 19. During that time I put on about 120 lbs. I had MAJOR hormonal issues that, looking back I beleive was far more than just teenage hormones and directly related to the pill.

    I ended up weighing 277lbs. The ONLY time I could loose weight (and I tried it all) was while pregnant (HORMONES!)....now this was after 10 years of trying to get pregnant. Messed up hormones were the biggest factor in not getting pregnant. Then, we found out what we needed to do, there was more tweaking that needed to be done to STAY pregnant.

    Now, we've got two kids and the husbands fixed, so thats out BC for the moment. If that ever changed, I'd go in and have my tubes tied.

  8. #8
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    Autum, since sperm can live for three days and occasionally four days, that opens up the window considerably. With my first daughter, we achieved pregnancy from intercourse that was *four days* before I ovulated.

    At that point, it becomes irrelevant what the egg and is much much more about the fact that *pregnancy is possible for a 4-5 day window depending on when ovulation occurs and when intercourse occurs in relation to that*.



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  9. #9
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    You could use the pull-out method (really reliable if you trust your partner) or natural family planning, or a combination of both. I highly recommend the book Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Weschler
    ~Sandy


  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Autumn View Post
    A woman can conceive during only 8 hours in each a cycle. Sperm lives approximately up to 3 days under the right conditions. So … reverse all the ‘when to make a baby’ calendars to ‘only heavy petting allowed’ calendars? Use condoms even though that could become an expensive affair in a steady relationship. Interrupted intercourse reduces risk for pregnancy by 83% (in those 8 hours + sperm lifetime).

    Autumn
    From what I've read (I'm referencing the book Taking Charge of Your Fertility here) you can ovulate for up to 48 hours (this is allowing for double ovulation--which causes fraternal twins--it's rare, but it does happen, so if you are using FAM, you need to allow for that). Furthermore, sperm can live for up to five days IF you have fertile cervical mucous (no cervical mucous and they can't survive longer than a few hours). So, even if you knew exactly when you ovulated, you can still be fertile, at the very least, for seven days.

    The book Taking Charge of Your Fertility recommends conservative, guidelines is practicing FAM because if you are aiming to not get pregnant, better be safe than sorry. Those above guidelines mentioned by Autumn seem like a sure way to get pregnant.

    But, back to the topic: FAM is an excellent method and I'd definitely recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility to every woman, regardless of BC method so that you can understand your body and its cycles. An IUD is excellent as well, although some childless women have a hard time getting a doctor to insert one. Condoms, diaphragms, and caps offer other options. Some women have a lot of luck with the latter two, but clinical trials show that they are less effective. You also are supposed to use spermicide, which is very unnatural and highly irritating.
    Last edited by Kara; 06-10-2010 at 10:52 AM.

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