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Thread: Rhabdomyolysis: How I almost died from being pushed to do too many pull-ups page 2

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldSchhool View Post
    You are totally right but I still feel like I've not had a good workout unless I'm sore the next day.
    That's reasonable for you. You train with bodybuilding parameters (many reps, long time under tension, all that other jazz).
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  2. #12
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    Holy crap. That kindda stuff makes me mad. If the OP did 5 or 10, she would have been appropriately challenged and would have had a great workout. But being pushed 'past the pain' inflicted a huge damage to her body. The exercise is fine, it's the concept of overtraining that is not. It seems to have originally come from the desire to get to the gym for min amount of time and martyr oneself to avoid doing it regularly and with joy or something. Stuff like Insanity and Biggest Looser promote this unhealthy outlook on fitness. Shame on the PT!
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  3. #13
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    Is it because they were negatives? When I reach failure I reach FAILURE - there's just no way I'm getting the weight up, no matter how hard I push, even if I was willing to damage myself. I know injuries happen but this is pretty extreme. How can this be avoided while still pushing yourself to where you force your body to adapt? Why haven't I heard of this more often on bodybuilding forums?
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cavewizard View Post
    Is it because they were negatives? When I reach failure I reach FAILURE - there's just no way I'm getting the weight up, no matter how hard I push, even if I was willing to damage myself. I know injuries happen but this is pretty extreme. How can this be avoided while still pushing yourself to where you force your body to adapt? Why haven't I heard of this more often on bodybuilding forums?
    Well, negatives (eccentric-only) fail long after concentric work has already failed. They're useful to increase volume when one can no longer perform a concentric repetition. Rhabdomyolysis just isn't that common, even amongst people who work really hard.

  5. #15
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    Wow, glad it turned out ok for you. Was this Gold's located in Leesburg by any chance?

    On another note, I love your little town, went there a couple weekends ago for the fair, and go once every so often for the winery.

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    For some of us women, negatives are the only kind of pull-up we can do for a while. It's one step on the way to doing a real pull-up. And it hurts like hell at first.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
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  7. #17
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    i'm really sorry that happened to you. but am wondering something, if it's ok to ask....why did you feel you couldn't say, screw that, i am not doing that many? what would he have done, kicked you out? i get that you trusted him, but i'm trying to understand why you felt you couldn't refuse to do what he says? i, in no way, am trying to lessen what happened to you, it was an awful thing....i'm merely curious about the why on not refusing to do what he insisted you do?

  8. #18
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    From what I understand...

    Quote Originally Posted by Cavewizard View Post
    Is it because they were negatives? When I reach failure I reach FAILURE - there's just no way I'm getting the weight up, no matter how hard I push, even if I was willing to damage myself. I know injuries happen but this is pretty extreme. How can this be avoided while still pushing yourself to where you force your body to adapt? Why haven't I heard of this more often on bodybuilding forums?
    From what I understand it was because of the negatives or the concentric portion of the lowering slowly under body weight....in rapid succession.

  9. #19
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    I don't think you can get rhabdo from negatives or any other real strength training protocol because it's too intense to take the volume high enough.

    Googling a bit I saw that Univerisity of Iowa football managed to rhabdo THIRTEEN guys in 2011 with a methodology that I think illustrates perfectly how to create rhabdo.

    1. Don't work up gradually. They did this workout after a 2 week break.

    2. Pointlessly high volume. 100 reps of back squats. Presumably for time.

    3. Intermediate resistance. 50% of max. Too light for real strength training. Too heavy for real cardio.

    Even doing everything 'right' still the majority of the athletes didn't get rhabdo.

  10. #20
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    It's all very well saying 'you should've said ''no''' but hindsight is a blessing, and what has happened is hugely unfortunate. I can't help but feel that no one is really to blame, the condition/disease, whatever you want to call it, is far too un-common to be taught to PT's (Like myself). I am a great promotor of research and constant learning. It's up to all parties involved to educate themselves. Blind faith is dangerous in any context (as was his in his training methods before it looks like i'm singling you out!). I hope sincerely this hasn't dimmed your view on exercise too much, as silly as that reads!
    What is recovery like? Can/will you train again?

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