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Thread: Overweight, middle-aged, sore ankles . . . how do I improve my walking?? page 2

  1. #11
    Jac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jammies View Post
    How's your vitamin D3 level? I get heel pain whenever mine is low. Maybe ankle pain wouldn't be too far off from that.

    Also, have you every tried a trial without nightshades? Some people have a major elimination of joint issues when they give them up.
    Vit D is great - just got test results back today .

    Yes, I've followed the link in your signature and it's really helped! I get pains in my feet and a bit in my fingers when I eat potatoes and you finally helped me to make sense of it!! It seemed like such a stupid symptom, lol. This ankle thing is something different, though.

    Through my PB time I've made so many changes, but it's taken a good doctor to help me to finally pull it all together. The weight will start to come off now that my hormone/toxin/inflammation profile is so different (he assures me of this, lol) - and I have the energy and desire to get stronger. I want to feel the joy of being in my body.
    Started Feb 18 2011

    Journalling here

    "There's a difference between knowing the path, and walking the path" - Morpheus

  2. #12
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    sbhikes is online now Senior Member
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    Yes, your heels hit first when you walk. If you are trying to walk fast, you will overstride or lengthen your stride, which will cause you to hit your heels harder. So you may need to slow down a little or consciously shorten your stride. The only way I can walk fast and keep up with other fast walkers while wearing minimalist footwear is to run. Which is why I go hiking in running shoes that have enough cushioning that I can walk fast without having to run.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 170 x 3. Current Deadlift: 220 x 3

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Yes, your heels hit first when you walk. If you are trying to walk fast, you will overstride or lengthen your stride, which will cause you to hit your heels harder. So you may need to slow down a little or consciously shorten your stride. The only way I can walk fast and keep up with other fast walkers while wearing minimalist footwear is to run. Which is why I go hiking in running shoes that have enough cushioning that I can walk fast without having to run.
    Ahhh, that makes so much sense!! I walk with my husband, who is fitter than I am and has very long legs. OK, I can shorten my stride and focus on softening that first impact. I think I'll try walking on my own for a bit and see if that helps. If it does, I could use supported shoes when we go for a 'lope' together.

    Thanks!
    Started Feb 18 2011

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    "There's a difference between knowing the path, and walking the path" - Morpheus

  4. #14
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    in terms of squatting, the man who taught me exercise programming when i studied personal training told us to get people who couldnt squat to use a swiss ball as support against a wall and roll down it like so

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nLfdHYJIfoQ

    otherwise i have seen suggestions for using a door frame or a post as support. i think a swiss ball would be better as you still have to balance yourself on the way down. they are cheap on trademe as i was looking for a balance board the other day.

    re: ankles and walking too. when i stuffed my ankle a few months back and it acted up. i found wearing combat boots really helped as they had an ankle support. mine are tactical assault boots so they are much softer and more flexible than a hiking or hunting boot.

  5. #15
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    seas, what did you think about the woman on the clip saying that you shouldn't go lower than parallel with squats?? I've heard both that you should and shouldn't, and both are just as definite .

    I use the post at the moment, but I don't really know that it's helping all that much because I think I rely on it too much. I do try and remember to ease off it, but end up practically swinging on the damn thing sometimes. But if I try to squat without any support I think my form goes all to shit.

    That's in interesting idea about the boots - I could use them when there's going to be extra stress on the ankles, like fast walking or rocks. Plus it would be bad-ass to have tactical assault boots
    Started Feb 18 2011

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  6. #16
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    i didnt have sound so i just watched it. i always go as low down as i can. ass to grass. i do overhead squats like that too which are sposed to be very good for your squat mobility. the only way to learn is to do it so maybe try the swiss ball. can you go to a gym or somewhere and just give it a go? see how it feels. then just do a bit at a time. go as low as you can and work your way down progressively over time. you will get stronger. there is also a stretch i think mark sisson refers to as the indigenous squat which is effectively the lowest position in a squat you could try and then go to standing without support. kind of the same principle as we teach ourselves to pistol squat or chin up by doing controlled negatives.

    these are my assault boots Blackhawk Warrior Wear Military Police Security Boots Australia New Zealand otherwise i have some vivo barefoot neo trails but no ankle support on them. i personally would try to strengthen the ankles by not wearing support all the time so your idea for only using them when there is going to be extra stress is a very good idea. oooh and i remembered. one of my many ankle injuries i helped heal by doing one legged squats on a bosu ball. but stay away from the cross trainer. that nuked it for another couple of weeks.

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    I'd practice all the good walking techniques on natural ground (grass, dirt, wooded areas). As long as they're relatively free of obstructions, like hills and rocks, it would be a great and gentle way to build up the natural strength.

    It makes sense from an ancestral perspective too, as we (well, our species) learned to walk on bare earth first before tackling the pavement!

  8. #18
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    It makes sense from an ancestral perspective too, as we (well, our species) learned to walk on bare earth first before tackling the pavement!
    this is a good point too. i hate VFFs to almost the extent of MC Hammer pants LOL i have also done my ankle from twisting it in the bush and then running on it on a treadmill in VFFs. The dog trainer i go to used to sled race and her team of huskies got injuries on what is effectively their ankles from running over a course with a section of sealed road. the vet told her this was the problem so she started slowing them to a walk over the sealed part of the course ( the rest was unsealed dirt road ) instead of letting them run and the injuries went away. it wasnt a large section of sealed road either. So my rule is, if i am running on a man made surface or walking for anything other than the odd few ks, i wear proper gym shoes or boots. ie man made shoes with support.

  9. #19
    Jac's Avatar
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    That's interesting, too - my ankle problem is much worse when I've been walking around on concrete or the industrial-type floors at work. I don't tend to get it after a weekend of gardening etc.
    Started Feb 18 2011

    Journalling here

    "There's a difference between knowing the path, and walking the path" - Morpheus

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jac View Post
    Ahhh, that makes so much sense!! I walk with my husband, who is fitter than I am and has very long legs. OK, I can shorten my stride and focus on softening that first impact. I think I'll try walking on my own for a bit and see if that helps. If it does, I could use supported shoes when we go for a 'lope' together.

    Thanks!
    As sbhikes said avoid the longer stride. Here is a link for barefoot walking tips from the Merrell footwear site, Merrell | BarefootWalkingTips, condensing your stride being the third point.

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