Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Cycling: What to eat, how to train. page

  1. #1
    Emtropy's Avatar
    Emtropy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Newcastle, UK
    Posts
    1,246

    Cycling: What to eat, how to train.

    Shop Now
    Hi all. I'm a former athlete with a few simplistic questions below.

    A bit of backstory:

    Since incorporating primal into my life, I've obviously had to refine certain beliefs - y'know the type: saturated fat is evil, girls shouldn't lift because they'll get buff, etc. So now, my questions may seem simplistic; questions a beginner would ask when they just start their sport out.

    It's not that way: I've been cycling most of my (short) life, and have only in the past year simultaneously quit competitive racing and taken up primal eating. I've always had a bit of a belly, despite cycling absolutely loads and following a "healthy" diet, but I only really noticed when I became a teenager. Disgusted with my body, I began to notoriously cut calories and increase cardio for the sake of losing my belly. I never did, and soon cycling became a means of burning calories and fat instead of a healthy, enjoyable exercise. How sad.

    When I was 14, I decided that I didn't enjoy cycling any more and quit. I don't know whether it was because I was trying to race a growing body on 1500 kcal or less per day, but I became slower and slower and more and more tired; it was just a task instead of a good environment. Like I said, I adopted VLC primal, and lost weight after two weeks; fwlt great. Spoilt it with a trip to the cinema, a full tub of ice cream, and two big bars of chocolate. became a slave to fat-and-sugar, and ended up with a BED. That's all gone, thank Christ, but I'm still overweight, and trying to lose. Though I'm eating well now, and hopefully my body will regulate itself, as I'm growing and all. I've grown about 2 cup sizes in a year-and-a-half, and have finally grown upwards! (and outwards, it seems...) I'm 15 years old, 5'4", and god knows how heavy. I have a solid frame, though.

    I'm lifting weights, I'm strong. I eat primal - only just started incorporating more fruit and starchy carbs.

    However!

    I think I want to race again. Mountain biking, that is. Specifically.

    Yet I know the stance on "CC". I suppose cycling would be classed as CC; what with the general consensus being "miles miles miles!!!!1". But the type of racing I'd like to do is around 60-90 minutes long, and with bursts - as we'd be climbing hills and descending.

    So: how do I train, primally, for a mountain bike race? Intervals, long rides, what?
    How can I incorporate primal eating into an athlete's diet?
    Any primal cyclists out there? Ones who race?
    Are long rides really necessary, or will intervals, short hard rides, and weightlifting suffice?


    I think I want to lose weight before I start to cycle again. a) to prove I can, and b) because cycling makes me really hungry and I'd end up eating more carbs and probably not lose weight. I'm working on that (check my journal) and I could really use some advice for it all.

    Thanks :3
    Last edited by Emtropy; 10-06-2013 at 10:46 AM.

  2. #2
    Iron Will's Avatar
    Iron Will is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vancouver B.C
    Posts
    621
    You will still need to train for your sport to increase your strength endurance and speed so if you already are doing a program that highlights these aspects keep with it.

    As for fueling your body using high starch higher glycemic carbs before and after your races are going to be needed for energy and optimal recovery.

    If you're looking for a specific program that will help with your strength and speed while maintaining your endurance levels that's a bit of a different question.

  3. #3
    Emtropy's Avatar
    Emtropy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Newcastle, UK
    Posts
    1,246
    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    You will still need to train for your sport to increase your strength endurance and speed so if you already are doing a program that highlights these aspects keep with it.

    As for fueling your body using high starch higher glycemic carbs before and after your races are going to be needed for energy and optimal recovery.

    If you're looking for a specific program that will help with your strength and speed while maintaining your endurance levels that's a bit of a different question.
    I haven't trained in ages. I'm just lifting weights 2-3x per week at the moment. I'm a little confused as to where to start for cycling? I guess I'd start with long, steady rides, but isn't that "chronic cardio" and bad?

    Is oatmeal made with 2% milk topped with fruit a good pre-race snack? And post, maybe some white rice, or fruit and yoghurt? And I'm guessing these meals would be as well as breakfast, lunch and dinner?

  4. #4
    Iron Will's Avatar
    Iron Will is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vancouver B.C
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by ebrady98 View Post
    I haven't trained in ages. I'm just lifting weights 2-3x per week at the moment. I'm a little confused as to where to start for cycling? I guess I'd start with long, steady rides, but isn't that "chronic cardio" and bad?

    Is oatmeal made with 2% milk topped with fruit a good pre-race snack? And post, maybe some white rice, or fruit and yoghurt? And I'm guessing these meals would be as well as breakfast, lunch and dinner?
    Meals or fuel however you see it should be high glycemic around training this will help with energy levels and recovery time. If you want to stick closer to a paleo style I would recommend fruit and starchy tubors like sweet potato and turnip. Add a little honey and turnip isn't half bad.

    As for training irregardless of whether it's chronic or not you are still going to need some level of endurance to beat your competition so yes you will need to do some endurance training. This will be more for the mental aspect than for the actual "conditioning/strength" of it. Sprints, HIIT, Tabatas will do far more for your VO2 and conditioning than steady state cardio will ever do.

    As for strength and speed I would recommend you train strength and speed on alternating days. Strength to consist of weights at 80% of max or what you can squat/press/dead for 3 reps. Do 8-10 sets with 3-5 minutes recovery between sets. Try to make the majority of your heavy movements focused on the concentric portion of the movement as much as possible. Heavy snatches and cleans followed by dead lift but dropping the weight from the top position. Make sure your gym is okay with this. Upper body work could be pin press (overhead and chest) as well as pull ups or chins.

    Speed work is done with light weights. Things like box jumps, high box step ups, plyometric and med ball work these all gain speed. Train speed with set of 5 but with 30-60 second rest breaks.

    Have fun!

  5. #5
    Emtropy's Avatar
    Emtropy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Newcastle, UK
    Posts
    1,246
    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    Meals or fuel however you see it should be high glycemic around training this will help with energy levels and recovery time. If you want to stick closer to a paleo style I would recommend fruit and starchy tubors like sweet potato and turnip. Add a little honey and turnip isn't half bad.
    So if I were to train in the morning: a breakfast of eggs and potatoes; or eggs, bacon, and a side of fruit, is OK? After, it could be a post-workout meal of some description...but that AND a lunch of protein and fat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    As for training irregardless of whether it's chronic or not you are still going to need some level of endurance to beat your competition so yes you will need to do some endurance training. This will be more for the mental aspect than for the actual "conditioning/strength" of it. Sprints, HIIT, Tabatas will do far more for your VO2 and conditioning than steady state cardio will ever do.
    I actually hate chronic cardio lol, if it's unnecessary then I won't do it. Just to be on the safe side, would a slow, steady ride once or twice per fortnight be acceptable? otherwise, weight-lifting, sprints, high-intensity, and skills practise (for mountain biking) are all better?

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    As for strength and speed I would recommend you train strength and speed on alternating days. Strength to consist of weights at 80% of max or what you can squat/press/dead for 3 reps. Do 8-10 sets with 3-5 minutes recovery between sets. Try to make the majority of your heavy movements focused on the concentric portion of the movement as much as possible. Heavy snatches and cleans followed by dead lift but dropping the weight from the top position. Make sure your gym is okay with this. Upper body work could be pin press (overhead and chest) as well as pull ups or chins.
    This is for now, or when I start cycling?

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    Speed work is done with light weights. Things like box jumps, high box step ups, plyometric and med ball work these all gain speed. Train speed with set of 5 but with 30-60 second rest breaks.

    Have fun!
    Thanks, it was very informative

    Sorry for all the questions...but if I were to devise a training plan, would something like this be OK?
    Monday: Sprints on bike
    Tuesday: Heavy weights
    Wednesday: light recovery: 30 minutes slow speed on bike or a walk
    Thursday: HIIT/Weights
    Friday: 1-2 hour ride
    Saturday: low intensity workout
    Sunday: Race: 60-90 minutes

  6. #6
    Iron Will's Avatar
    Iron Will is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vancouver B.C
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by ebrady98 View Post
    So if I were to train in the morning: a breakfast of eggs and potatoes; or eggs, bacon, and a side of fruit, is OK? After, it could be a post-workout meal of some description...but that AND a lunch of protein and fat?



    I actually hate chronic cardio lol, if it's unnecessary then I won't do it. Just to be on the safe side, would a slow, steady ride once or twice per fortnight be acceptable? otherwise, weight-lifting, sprints, high-intensity, and skills practise (for mountain biking) are all better?



    This is for now, or when I start cycling?



    Thanks, it was very informative

    Sorry for all the questions...but if I were to devise a training plan, would something like this be OK?
    Monday: Sprints on bike
    Tuesday: Heavy weights
    Wednesday: light recovery: 30 minutes slow speed on bike or a walk
    Thursday: HIIT/Weights
    Friday: 1-2 hour ride
    Saturday: low intensity workout
    Sunday: Race: 60-90 minutes
    Breakfast looks good and if you train in the morning that's the best time because your cortisol levels should be at their highest. You can also add nuts into your breakfast as they are also very high in energy. And yes protein after your work out too. You will need to protein to rebuild the muscle that you have broken down. Make sure you're burning the calories you're taking in. This will be something specific to you and you will have to tinker with it a bit to dial in.

    Your training program looks pretty good too just make sure you're lifting heavy enough on your heavy days. That's very important. And I you don't want to do the endurance, well, don't. . And you can start this program at anytime. No time like the present!

  7. #7
    Emtropy's Avatar
    Emtropy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Newcastle, UK
    Posts
    1,246
    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    Breakfast looks good and if you train in the morning that's the best time because your cortisol levels should be at their highest. You can also add nuts into your breakfast as they are also very high in energy. And yes protein after your work out too. You will need to protein to rebuild the muscle that you have broken down. Make sure you're burning the calories you're taking in. This will be something specific to you and you will have to tinker with it a bit to dial in.

    Your training program looks pretty good too just make sure you're lifting heavy enough on your heavy days. That's very important. And I you don't want to do the endurance, well, don't. . And you can start this program at anytime. No time like the present!
    OK, thanks very much for your help!

    if I do race again - using this eating regime and training programme - and do well, it'll be cool to say I don't do much endurance :')

  8. #8
    Richardmac's Avatar
    Richardmac is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    369
    Have a look at this. Its laid out over two pages.

    http://mountainbike.about.com/od/fit...y_Strength.htm

    Keep fat high on none race days. Try and find paleo friendly carbs before and after exercise. Keep protein high always. Drink loads of water, and consider taking in chocolate milk straight after a session.

    Richard
    It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out....Its the grain of sand in your shoe.

  9. #9
    Emtropy's Avatar
    Emtropy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Newcastle, UK
    Posts
    1,246
    Quote Originally Posted by Richardmac View Post
    Have a look at this. Its laid out over two pages.

    http://mountainbike.about.com/od/fit...y_Strength.htm

    Keep fat high on none race days. Try and find paleo friendly carbs before and after exercise. Keep protein high always. Drink loads of water, and consider taking in chocolate milk straight after a session.

    Richard
    Thanks Richard!

    Store bought chocolate milk OK?

  10. #10
    Richardmac's Avatar
    Richardmac is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    369
    PrimalCon New York
    Yeh I use a Cadburys drinking chocolate. 300ml's milk and 2-2.5 tablespoons of chocolate. Stops any post training sugar cravings and dishes out about 15g's protein.

    If you decide to have another one of these at a non exercise related time of the day feel free to add in a tablespoon of olive oil. This will give you 120 calories of great fat. If this other shake is no where near exercise then It doesn't matter that the fat in the oil will slow down the absorption of protein.

    Richard
    It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out....Its the grain of sand in your shoe.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •