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    Baichi's Avatar
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    Question introducing gluten to babies?

    Primal Fuel
    Hello
    I'm pregnant expecting my baby in April. I plan for us to eat and live as primal as we can. Now the information I got so far says parents should introduce gluten to babies at 6 months old "during the protection of breastfeeding". I don't want to give my kid any gluten before the inevitable happens: kindergarden and school. So now I wonder, is it true that it's best to introduce gluten at 6 months old while still breastfeeding? Will the risk of my kid developing celiac become greater or smaller if I follow these guidelines? What do you think? Do you have the same guidelines in your county(ies)? I'm from Sweden.

    The fact is my kid is going to eat gluten someday, sometimes whether I like it or not. Because of kindergarden, school and maybe other friends. So I of course want to make the best choise for my kid not to develop celiac or gluten intolerance. But I'm not sure what to do. If the guidelines have any sense at all or if they are as stupid as the guidelines for diabetics.

    If I don't introduce gluten to my kid so the first time he/she will eat gluten will be in kindergarden. Will my kid be more or less sensitive to gluten?



    Maria

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    I have 3 children and have never heard of that!
    Food introduction from 6mths + yes bit not gluten.
    You are usually recommend to start of with rice cereal (least likely to cause allergic reaction) the puréed fruit & veg (in order of least likely to cause allergy, something you'd have to look up as my youngest is now 6 years, I think I stared with apple)
    I didn't really start bread until 1year old. My kids never had teething rusks (hard bread). It's up to you.
    Celiacs is genetic, if your baby has it, it's from birth. Gluten intolerance can be caused by to much gluten, among other things (can be a small genetic component in there too)

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    Hello,
    Your baby started life with a quite opened gut lining for a good reason. At 6 months old, the baby's gut has matured some and should be much less leaky. Introducing gluten to a 6 months old is simply crazy. It will never allow the gut lining to become fully tight. I don't think you want to impose a leaky gut to your child, it will backfire big time later on with allergies and what-not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FrenchFry View Post
    Hello,
    Your baby started life with a quite opened gut lining for a good reason. At 6 months old, the baby's gut has matured some and should be much less leaky. Introducing gluten to a 6 months old is simply crazy. It will never allow the gut lining to become fully tight. I don't think you want to impose a leaky gut to your child, it will backfire big time later on with allergies and what-not.
    Uhh... what? And what's the reason, may I ask?
    This isn't meant negatively, as I'm only 18 & don't have children (and am pretty sure I'll never want children) but this made me curious. Why is the gut lining quite opened?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hannakb View Post
    Celiacs is genetic, if your baby has it, it's from birth.
    This isn't entirely the case - epigenetics suggests that genes can express themselves differently depending on your lifestyle (in fact this is the basis for much of the Primal Blueprint). About 30% of the population have the genetic markers for coeliac, but only about 1% or so actually develop it. So the recommendation is aimed at preventing the triggering of coeliac in susceptible babies. The advice is the same here in the UK - there was a study showing that a window between 6 and 7 months was the best time to introduce gluten to minimise the chances of coeliac. So, not having heard about Primal/paleo I followed the advice for my two children. I would do things very differently now. The study will doubtless have been done assuming that it is normal and healthy for people to eat copious quantities of gluten, and of course we know differently. I do not know when/if I would introduce gluten if I had my time over again - as you say, it is inevitable that they will eat some eventually. I certainly wouldn't introduce it in large quantities. I would probably wait until they encountered it accidentally outside the home, but I would have to do more reading.

    My son, (despite) following the guidelines to introduce gluten between 6 and 7 months, has a gluten intolerance and probably due to this and the resulting leaky gut, has also ended up with a severe allergy to certain nuts. So I wish I could have my time over and let him eat primally from the start.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Introvert_Huntress View Post
    Uhh... what? And what's the reason, may I ask?
    This isn't meant negatively, as I'm only 18 & don't have children (and am pretty sure I'll never want children) but this made me curious. Why is the gut lining quite opened?
    Hello,

    Because as far as I know, babies need some stuff from what they eat that would not go through the gut were it not for these openings. You can read this article:

    When Leaky Gut is a Good Thing

    Here is an excerpt:

    Leaky gut is good for babies

    Infants receive much much more than just nutrients from mother’s milk. They also receive mother’s antibodies which are large protein molecules. In order to allow the flow of these antibody molecules into the baby’s bloodstream, the intestinal lining has to be pervious enough to accommodate the large molecules.

    The antibodies protect baby from bacteria, viruses and other potentially pathogenic microorganisms, which is why human breast milk is so important.

    Clearly, leaky gut is a good thing for a baby to have in those first months of life when the immune system is undeveloped and weak.

    Sealing the baby’s gut

    It is critical to seal the baby’s intestinal lining before they start solid foods. If large protein particles from food enter the bloodstream, the body’s immune system will react as if they were foreign invaders and launch an immune response. The immune system then remembers that particular foreign invader and will attack it if it tries to enter again. This is how food allergies develop.
    The last paragraph quoted above is a clear anti-gluten statement when babies start to eat solid foods. My wife and I were right not to give gluten to our first kid, even though we were not gluten-free ourselves at the time. But come to think of it, I might have been introduced to gluten myself very early ...
    Last edited by FrenchFry; 10-03-2013 at 01:38 AM.

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    I was reading stuff earlier today that suggests foods introduced to the skin BEFORE they are introduced orally sets up the allergy.

    Our immune system is primed to be tolerant of things that we put in our mouths. But, so the theory goes, things that penetrate our skin first can only be parasitic... and deserve a strong reaction (IgE being the immune response to parasites).

    Introducing a food too soon isn't good because baby's digestive system isn't ready. But leaving food introduction too late could increases the chance of meeting an allergen via the skin before oral tolerance develops.

    A factor may be that some nappy creams are made from soy oil (a legume) and can cross react with peanuts (also a legume).

    Anyway, that's what I read. You can find research papers on the 'net about this theory.

    it's possible that the skin route can be a problem in adults too. Don't slather yourself in wheatgerm oil! I did during a pregnancy... it's great for stretch marks, but possibly not so great for gluten intolerance, which I now have. Whether the two really are linked in me I don't know, because it took another 10 years before it came to light.

    I think I would introduce it to my future babies (although there won't be any!) in order to aim to develop oral tolerance, even if I thought it was an unhealthy food and planned not to eat it much in the future. I used to have a really robust digestive system though, and have no close relatives with coeliac disease or any kind of autoimmune disease - if I did that might make me pause.

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    @poing
    Again, I would be VERY CAREFUL with gluten. Some gluten peptides are very similar in structure with the A1 bovine milk peptide BCM7. And to be honest, this is really bad (read The Devil in the Milk by Keith Woodford). You can also read this: http://nourishinghope.com/2011/02/ud...a2-betacasein/

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    Why?

    I wouldn't feed my baby anything I wouldn't eat myself. I don't eat gluten, so why would I feed it to my child?
    Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

    Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
    Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
    Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
    F/23/5'9"

    26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FrenchFry View Post
    @poing
    Again, I would be VERY CAREFUL with gluten. Some gluten peptides are very similar in structure with the A1 bovine milk peptide BCM7. And to be honest, this is really bad (read The Devil in the Milk by Keith Woodford). You can also read this: Udderly New Insight About Milk and Autism: An Emerging New Hypothesis on A1 and A2 Beta-Casein | Nourishing Hope
    I don't eat gluten and I've been buying mostly A2 milk for a while now...

    We might be talking about a trade off between small amounts of gluten in baby's diet while weaning (and you could choose more digestible sources like ancient grains, properly prepared) versus the possibility of serious harm from a lifelong wheat allergy. The trouble is that I don't think we really know what the science is telling us yet.

    Avoiding something can change things... My immune system is in a totally different place now compared to where it was when I was eating gluten, it's much more reactive than it used to be, and I'm pretty sure that's not all good.

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