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Thread: Excessive build up of lactic acid in thighs

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  1. #1
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    Excessive build up of lactic acid in thighs

    Hi guys

    Very new to all this so bear with me.

    I have always had issues with lactic acid build up when I exercise in that it hangs around for days on end, longer than I'd expect it too.

    My main problem area is my thighs and as much as I try to massage the muscles this rarely helps and the muscles still feel stiff.

    Has anyone any suggestions on how to avoid this problem, or at least limit the impact?

    This latest bout was brought on after a 2mile run followed by a pull-ups/push-ups & squat routine then a gentle stroll back to the house.

    I also cycle 5miles to work and back 5 days a week and this mornings ride hasn't really helped ease anything.

    Advice gratefully received. Thank you

  2. #2
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    Do you eat a low carb diet with an emphasis on "fat burning metabolism"?

  3. #3
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    Maybe you should replenish your glycogen stores more often.

  4. #4
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    I started off as a low gi girl, but for a little while now the only carbs I've had have been from fruits, veg and sweet potatoes.

    I've been trying to increase my protein intake as I don't think I've been getting enough, perhaps I do need to up my fat intake too? I've started having bulletproof coffee in the mornings to help with this - had one yesterday and this morning - felt like I flew round my usual run circuit and it was hours later.

    Sorry this feels like it ought to be more of a nutrition based question now :-/

    Foods good for replacing glycogen? Sorry if the answer to that is very basic, as I said, still very new to this.

    Thanks again for your assistance

    X

  5. #5
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    I don't buy the glycogen answer.
    lactic acid is produced by high intensity work that uses glycogen.
    It's clearance is an aerobic process that doesn't require glycogen.

    Supposedly aerobic activity for the same muscles accelerates LA removal but it sounds like you did that.

  6. #6
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    The burn in your legs isn't lactate (lactic acid without the hydrogen ion). Wheneating low carb your muscles produce much less lactate than you would on a mixed diet. Lactate by the way, is beneficial to performance, and can't be made from fatty acids (unless you count in the small amount that can be made from glucose, made from acetone, a ketone body). What you are feeling is much more likely the discomfort of inadequate muscle glycogen, and hence the reduced exercise capacity that follows. Sure enough, when fully adapted to a low carb diet, the aerobic capacity is almost restored to normal, but the anaerobic capacity and endurance is seriously lacking behind and will never recover unless you eat enough protein to make sufficient glucose, to meet your bodily needs. This simply isn't possible when doing a lot of intense exercise, that taps into the anaerobic energy system. The people claiming that low carb diets doesn't interfere with exercise, are typically doing low volume and/or low intensity type of exercise.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by toscamulder View Post
    The burn in your legs isn't lactate (lactic acid without the hydrogen ion). Wheneating low carb your muscles produce much less lactate than you would on a mixed diet. Lactate by the way, is beneficial to performance, and can't be made from fatty acids (unless you count in the small amount that can be made from glucose, made from acetone, a ketone body). What you are feeling is much more likely the discomfort of inadequate muscle glycogen, and hence the reduced exercise capacity that follows. Sure enough, when fully adapted to a low carb diet, the aerobic capacity is almost restored to normal, but the anaerobic capacity and endurance is seriously lacking behind and will never recover unless you eat enough protein to make sufficient glucose, to meet your bodily needs. This simply isn't possible when doing a lot of intense exercise, that taps into the anaerobic energy system. The people claiming that low carb diets doesn't interfere with exercise, are typically doing low volume and/or low intensity type of exercise.
    What does this mean?
    Lack of glycogen could certainly limit anaerobic exercise but less volume of intense exercise should mean less soreness.
    I have experienced the limiting of intense exercise myself but never any extra or unexpected soreness.

  8. #8
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    I know the feeling myself. When you are not yet training long enough for lactic acidosis to take place, but you do feel this kind of tight feeling in your -legs-, an unpleasant feel. I am now searching the exact biochemical reaction I am describing.

  9. #9
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  10. #10
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    That seems to be a nice exposition of what we agree on.
    Is there some connection between glycogen shortage and pain I didn't see in my skim?
    I've been low-carbing much of the last 13 years and I haven't even seen this claimed that I remember.

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