Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Excessive build up of lactic acid in thighs page 2

  1. #11
    runningout's Avatar
    runningout is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    21
    Shop Now
    Any changes, there is too little rest and feeling is fatique ?
    Cycling mornings & evenings, running and squats on top, might add-up too much. This of cource depends on many things. Easy Cycling, on flat route, with high RPM could help recovery. Hard cycling, hard profile, low RPM adds load especially to tights (and should be counted as training..)
    If squatting is a new routine, it would take some time to adapt to it and might need more time to recovery.
    If running is hill-sprinting (not flat land jogging) it stresses more tights and might need extra recovery.

  2. #12
    bcbcbc2's Avatar
    bcbcbc2 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    581
    That seems to be a nice exposition of what we agree on.
    Is there some connection between glycogen shortage and pain I didn't see in my skim?
    I've been low-carbing much of the last 13 years and I haven't even seen this claimed that I remember.

  3. #13
    toscamulder's Avatar
    toscamulder is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Hilversum, The Netherlands
    Posts
    106
    I think it's more of an unpleasant feel. You could go on, but something stops you, it feels unnatural to go on.

  4. #14
    OldSchhool's Avatar
    OldSchhool is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    2,834
    Try taking some Bicarbonate of soda prior to the exercise.

  5. #15
    agenthh's Avatar
    agenthh is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    Posts
    4
    Thanks guys, lots of info to consider.

    The muscle ache doesn't come on during the exercise though, it's the day after, and the day after that and the day after that...and I feel it during the normal day to day range of motions, slow walking, going up and down stairs etc.

    The exercises aren't new to me, I've been doing them for a while so my muscles should be used to them by now.

    I usually only run on a day I've not cycled and it's all on the flat. My cycle route is fairly flat too, I manage an average pace of 15mph and I've been cycling for years.

    I'll have a read through the linked study and see if it makes sense.

    And will try a little bicarb next time I go out.

    Thanks x

    Sent from my C6603 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

  6. #16
    diene's Avatar
    diene is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northeastern U.S.
    Posts
    1,659
    If you've been doing the same workouts for a long time, then is this discomfort a new thing, something that started happening after you went low carb? (Are you low carb? This isn't clear from your posts.)

    I'm not sure what caused it, but, in my experience, when I was VLC (very low carb--meaning less than 20 g of net carbs per day, on average), it became increasingly difficult for me to recover from my workouts. And I was even doing a cyclic ketogenic diet that included carb refeeds once a week (that's just a nice way of saying I ate lots of carbs on weekends). But I was always in ketosis by Wednesday, according to the color of ketostix.

    Anyway, back then I was doing the same workout routine that I had been doing for a long time. And for as long as I remember, I was always able to do sprints on a day after weight-lifting. However, after being on a cyclic ketogenic diet for a couple weeks, I started to be unable to sprint the day after weights because my muscles wouldn't have fully recovered. This is despite the fact that I was lifting the same weights every week. Well, I did improve a little, but it really wasn't enough to be meaningful. It was 100% caused by a lack of carbs because it went away after I added carbs back into my diet.

    Now, I can do all kinds of crazy stuff at Crossfit and still sprint the next day.

  7. #17
    RyanIPT's Avatar
    RyanIPT is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    13
    Hi agenthh,

    Lactic acid is cleared from the muscles pretty fast... most of it is gone within 10 minutes. It sounds more like DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) is what you are experiencing.

    Decades ago, researchers believe this was caused by lactic acid, but we now know this is not the case. The accepted theory right now is that the pain 24-72 hrs after a workout (DOMS) is caused by microscopic muscle damage and subsequent inflammation.

    No straight forward answer for you, but hopefully this will steer you in the right direction.

    Ryan
    Last edited by RyanIPT; 10-03-2013 at 01:50 PM.

  8. #18
    Iron Will's Avatar
    Iron Will is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vancouver B.C
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by RyanIPT View Post
    Hi agenthh,

    Lactic acid is cleared from the muscles pretty fast... most of it is gone within 10 minutes. It sounds more like DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) is what you are experiencing.

    Decades ago, researchers believe this was caused by lactic acid, but we now know this is not the case. The accepted theory right now is that the pain 24-72 hrs after a workout (DOMS) is caused by microscopic muscle damage and subsequent inflammation.

    No straight forward answer for you, but hopefully this will steer you in the right direction.

    Ryan
    I would tend to agree. What you're describing sounds more like DOMS than lactic burn. As I've played around with different amino acids I found that arginine really helps with both the clearance of lactic acid as well as DOMS.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •