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    pollo_la's Avatar
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    Primal on a budget - compromises...

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    Okay, we have 8 people to feed in our family and compromises have to be made. So, how bad are they really???

    1) White rice
    2) Potatoes
    3) Non GMO popping corn popped in coconut oil
    4) peanuts in comparison to Almonds

    So, of the above what would you say is best and why (from a nutritional standpoint)? These will not be once in a while, in order to stay within our budget for food these will be somewhat regular foods that we will consume. Also, primal or not, is there some other really cheap food that we can fill up on that I'm not thinking of?

    And how important is Grass fed beef vs. regular beef? There is a local store where I can get grass fed beef for 4.19 a pound if I buy in bulk (everywhere else... regular beef is running around 2.99 a pound). If we went with the grass fed beef vs. regular we would end up eating less meat overall though, and filling up more on something like rice or potatoes. Would it be better to eat less meat, but of better quality, or more meat or lesser quality?

    Also, no weight problems in our family, lots of small kiddos, I'm nursing a baby, and my husband is active. We follow a Primal way of eating strictly for the nutritional aspect of food (and what it does in our bodies). I don't care if a food is actually "primal" or not. I simply care about what a food does when in my body after I eat it!

    Thanks!

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    IMO:
    Rice and potatoes fine for daily use.
    Corn is high in fungal toxins depending on the source. The hulls wreck my gut so I pass.
    Peanuts are high in allergenic protein, omega-6 fat, and fungal toxins. Individual reactions vary of course.
    CAFO beef is okay but I'd drain the fat.

    Stretching protein with starch is good budget sense assuming no (pre)diabetes etc. I'd also make stews with connective cuts (shanks, tails, shoulder chops, hearts, turkey necks) and bulk it up with humble absorbent vegetables like onions, cabbage, carrots, celery, turnips, cauliflower, white mushrooms, and chayote. Dried peas are pretty harmless too. Each bite will taste protein-y.

    Some canned seafood like mackerel are amazing protein/dollar too.
    Fruit prices fluctuate wildly with the season, watch the promotions.
    Check local prices for things like cassava and plantains. They might be more $/lb. than Russets but they're also more dense.
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    Thanks for your help. :-) I didn't know about the dried peas. They are not as bad as other legumes? We all love pea soup!

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    Those are all fine for regular consumption, IMO, but I'd have the peanut butter in moderation. Buy organ meats and gelatin to stretch the nutrients and protein. You can add gelatin to just about any dish.

    Other suggestions: Eggs, canned clams and oysters, white rice noodles, bake GF bread with rice, potato, tapioca, quality dairy, bananas, nixtamalized corn (masa harina), coconut oil, liver and other organ meats, bone broths (save all your bones and make broth out of them!); ask your butcher about bones and other parts to make bone broth with, they might sell them uber cheap or give them to you.

    The most important things, I think, are eating nutrient-dense foods, keeping PUFAs low and using mostly saturated fats, and getting quality protein. The rest is customizable. Not every meal needs to be meat and organic vegetables. Fruit and dairy and eggs and starches and gelatin and bivalves will get you the most for your budget.
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    picklepete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pollo_la View Post
    I didn't know about the dried peas. They are not as bad as other legumes?
    They aren't my plan A starch but ya, the lectins and indigestible proteins are very mild compared to proper beans.
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    Comments in bold.
    Quote Originally Posted by pollo_la View Post
    Okay, we have 8 people to feed in our family and compromises have to be made. So, how bad are they really???

    1) White rice - YES
    2) Potatoes - YES (every dinner we eat has one or both of these two)
    3) Non GMO popping corn popped in coconut oil - NO
    4) peanuts in comparison to Almonds - NO

    So, of the above what would you say is best and why (from a nutritional standpoint)? These will not be once in a while, in order to stay within our budget for food these will be somewhat regular foods that we will consume. Also, primal or not, is there some other really cheap food that we can fill up on that I'm not thinking of?

    And how important is Grass fed beef vs. regular beef? There is a local store where I can get grass fed beef for 4.19 a pound if I buy in bulk (everywhere else... regular beef is running around 2.99 a pound). If we went with the grass fed beef vs. regular we would end up eating less meat overall though, and filling up more on something like rice or potatoes. Would it be better to eat less meat, but of better quality, or more meat or lesser quality?
    Well, it depends on what other quality protein sources you would use instead. If you ate less meat, what would you fill up the gap with? We are fortunate enough to buy whole cows at a time, which works out at roughly half the per-kilo price we would pay at the supermarket. Of course, it requires a chest freezer...

    Also, no weight problems in our family, lots of small kiddos, I'm nursing a baby, and my husband is active. We follow a Primal way of eating strictly for the nutritional aspect of food (and what it does in our bodies). I don't care if a food is actually "primal" or not. I simply care about what a food does when in my body after I eat it!
    Great stuff. Yep, I think 'safe starches' are a must include for your family. Round it out with good saturated fats and good sources of protein, and you're good to go. Keep it up

    Thanks!
    p.s. Just wanted to second everything that picklepete said. One of the hidden benefits to fatty cuts of grass fed beef is that you can render off all of your cooking fats as well (which can be expensive if you just buy it by itself).
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

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    I'm often amazed how much can be saved by researching online and buying in bulk, even with 'luxury' foods. Most recent example: the "mammoth" pecan halves I use on salads etc. clocked in at over $17/lb at Safeway. After going through the entire Georgia Pecan Growers' Board list and checking prices, I got 30lbs direct from Schermer Pecan Farm in Ga...$7/lb with free shipping. Not local, but for 60% off I'll take it.
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    While I realize that the difference in CAFO vs grass fed can be a lot on the wallet, of all the animals I eat, I don't want to compromise on beef. For one thing, even though other meats are labelled "hormone and antibiotic free," beef is really the only one where hormones are legal (check the USDA website), so that label is a marketing thing for any other meats sold in the U.S. IOW, you might be getting subtherapeutic antibiotics in CAFO meats, but in beef, you get the added bonus of hormones. I'll pass.

    White rice and potatoes. Nutritionally, I believe potatoes are better. White rice is a bit of a null food. If you buy traditionally grown potatoes, you might want to peel them before using. Other things grown underground like turnips, beets, etc., might be something to look at for budgetary and nutritional reasons.

    I'll never eat U.S. corn again, but I'm paranoid, and it's a political stand as much as a nutritional stand for me.

    Peanuts are like the beef of the veggie world. They're stored too long before processing. Unless you buy "hippie" peanut butter, it's usually processed with seed oil, sugar, and stabilizers. And it's a legume.

    Food is an economy of scale. When a person first switches from conventionally grown produce and CAFO meats to organic produce and grass fed/pastured meats, they think it's expensive. Then you start googling and seeing the differences in how your food is grown and raised, and you realize why CAFO meats are cheap. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation - the most animals in the least space, the cheapest feed for those animals, and when allowed by law, a nice dose of hormones to make them grow bigger or produce more milk faster. And because the growth hormones make a lot of them sick, we'll just dose them with antibiotics on a regular basis, sick or not.

    Also, eat some wild salmon occasionally. Not only is it sinfully delicious, but it's really good for you. Other oily fish are sardines (easily found canned).

    Do a search of "dirty dozen food" to see which produce items are the best and worst if you don't buy organic.

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    Thanks everyone! You all helped a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cantare View Post
    I'm often amazed how much can be saved by researching online and buying in bulk, even with 'luxury' foods. Most recent example: the "mammoth" pecan halves I use on salads etc. clocked in at over $17/lb at Safeway. After going through the entire Georgia Pecan Growers' Board list and checking prices, I got 30lbs direct from Schermer Pecan Farm in Ga...$7/lb with free shipping. Not local, but for 60% off I'll take it.
    I'm sorry, but I'm not going to consume 30 lbs of pecans before the oils go bad (if they haven't already). I'll take the $17/lb for a handful when I want.

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