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Thread: Primal on a budget - compromises... page 2

  1. #11
    cantare's Avatar
    cantare is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by sakura_girl View Post
    I'm sorry, but I'm not going to consume 30 lbs of pecans before the oils go bad (if they haven't already). I'll take the $17/lb for a handful when I want.
    Lightweight!

    They keep fine in the freezer...I'll take your $17 any time you wanna come over.
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  2. #12
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    p.s. This wasn't in the OP, but I've found that organ meats are the cheapest cuts of meat and are the cheapest as well. Here's some budget cuts that we find (in the pet food section of our supermarket)

    1. Mutton flaps - great for roasting, and produces cups of fat as well to cook other foods with
    2. Pigs head - get the 'ew' from a bunch of posters on here (and my wife) but the price is hard to beat
    3. Beef Heart, Ox Kidney, Chicken Livers - all great (the first two combine really well into a steak and kidney pie)

    I think that's all of the animals represented.....
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

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  3. #13
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    I know that here in Europe you have quite a few toko's. They sell brown rice in large quantities. The price is often better than white rice from the supermarket... however I do not know if you have shops like that where you live.

    Also, I saw a brilliant piece on the BBC a while ago about foraging in your own back yard. Apparently with a bit of education we can eat a lot from what we find in the wild. (I haven't tried it yet because in Holland so much is very polluted.) YOu can try to see if you can get your greens and/or herbs from nature and save the money to buy better quality food. (Kids love to do these things)

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarielleGO View Post
    I know that here in Europe you have quite a few toko's. They sell brown rice in large quantities. The price is often better than white rice from the supermarket... however I do not know if you have shops like that where you live.

    Also, I saw a brilliant piece on the BBC a while ago about foraging in your own back yard. Apparently with a bit of education we can eat a lot from what we find in the wild. (I haven't tried it yet because in Holland so much is very polluted.) YOu can try to see if you can get your greens and/or herbs from nature and save the money to buy better quality food. (Kids love to do these things)
    There are a lot of books available about collecting mushrooms and greens and other edibles from the wild. You just have to be able to get away from the pollution and sprays that might be on them.

  5. #15
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    Great idea about trying to get some food from the land we have. We actually have 2.5 acres and plan to start a small garden next spring. We got baby chicks this spring (started laying close to a month ago), and now we have been having fresh eggs for breakfast just about daily. :-)

    I definitely need to do more with bone broths and organ meats. Thanks for bringing that up.

  6. #16
    MarielleGO's Avatar
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    With 2,5 acres you have pace enough to make a lot of things yourself. maybe plant some fruit trees or bushes. carrots, potato, lettuce, green beens en herbs are easy to maintain and don't need a lot of space. chickens are always easy to keep but try to see if you have space for a few goats... goat milk is great and you can use the meat.... or pigs... pigs don't need too much space and are easy to feed. beside grass they eat almost everything...

  7. #17
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    Aother vote for soups (no way to make a single chicken stretch further! Can feed 8 people easily!) Also, check out roasts - invest in a slow cooker and go with the cheap cuts because they can become tender and delicious when cooked properly! Bulk ground beef (get lean!) can stretch with rice pasta to make delicious spaghetti, or with properly prepared beans for chili. You can find cheap rice noodles at Asian grocery stores. Ingredients are just white rice and water.

    We are on a budget too, but thankfully it is just the two of us (my hubby and I) but soups, roasts, and potatoes/rice are a life saver.
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  8. #18
    eats.meats.west's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cantare View Post
    Lightweight!

    They keep fine in the freezer...I'll take your $17 any time you wanna come over.
    I've bought large quantities in the past and they do freeze well. However Trader Joe's pricing on nuts is comparable and I don't have to lay out the cash for 30lbs.

  9. #19
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    I honestly don't trust anything that doesn't come fresh from inside the shell and/or taste completely fresh.

    But yeah, I'll buy $0.40 of pecans off you any day

  10. #20
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    I see all of those as *no problem!*

    You might also consider things like sweet potato, squash, and pumpkins -- all of which are easy to grow, too, if you want to do that.

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