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Thread: BEEF STOCK (or broth?) Questions page

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    EVIL's Avatar
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    BEEF STOCK (or broth?) Questions

    Primal Fuel
    i have spent HOURS researching, but haven't had any luck answering these questions of mine... all i can find is hundreds of blogs and recipes detailing how these people made their stock, or broth...

    1) when you put bones in a pot to simmer for hours on end in order to extract the minerals and gelatin, what is the final product called? STOCK... or BROTH? i am talking about the gelatinous stuff (becomes jelly-like after cooling)

    2) when the stuff cools and the fat rises to the top, and forms a hard shell on top.... is that considered tallow? some say it is not tallow, some say it is.

    3) is that fat mentioned above healthy? it appears to just be a super concentrated, easily digestible form of fat. i am pretty sure it is mostly MUFAs, which can be a good thing. BUT, a lot of people say to discard it because that is where all the toxins from the animal are stored, so you'd be eating a concentrated amount of toxins.

    4) what is the optimal time to cook this broth-stock concoction? here's 2 thoughts:

    -some say use a pressure cooker for only about 4 hours in order rapidly cook the bones and extract the nutrients, which is optimal because nutrients exposed to high levels of heat for long periods of time degrade into useless material

    -others say that as long as it is just simmering, you should cook it for a few days in order to extract ALL the nutrients

    i have been making this broth for a while now, and i LOVE the taste of it. however, whenever i eat it, it seems to give me a strange feeling in my stomach for a few hours, and i also burp it up during that time. it's almost as if it's unsettling, but eventually it goes away. i have read that a lot of people experience this same thing, and some people say that it's because the gelatin is not being properly digested, and needs pepsin in order to cleave an amino acid. so i started taking pepsin supplements with it, but it didn't change anything.



    i make my broth by simmering grass-fed marrow bones in filtered water with some apple cider vinegar for about 3 days. once i'm ready to take it off, i take out the bones, pour the liquid through a strainer into a large bowl, then put the bowl in the fridge. once the gel hardens and the fat rises to the top to form a shell, i take off that white fat shell, separate the gel into different containers (some for fridge, some for freezer), and that's it.

    when i'm ready to use the gel, i take a few scoops and put it on my food.

    i was using the white fatty shell for a while, but whenever i did, it seemed like digestion of that meal took about 10 times longer than normal, assuming it is from the high fat content. but even when i eat lots of butter, it doesn't give me the full feeling that this fat does. i'm not sure if that's good or bad

    so lately i stopped using the white fat and began giving a little piece to my dog in her food (after melting it and mixing it with dry food). she loves the taste of it. THEN i read that cheap dog foods use tallow and it should be avoided because it will do nothing for your dog other than make it fat.

    i just need some insight. i want to include this supposedly super healthy food into my diet, but i don't think i'm doing it right. any info would be seriously appreciated.

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    APPLEGIRL's Avatar
    APPLEGIRL is offline Senior Member
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    Stock and broth are very similar, and most people use the terms interchangeably, and for practical purposes, that is fine. I do believe however, that in culinary terms, broth is a bit more complete and a bit richer. Made with perhaps more meat, seasoned with salt and pepper and can stand on it's own as a soup if desired, whereas stock may be a bit more plain and often isn't seasoned with salt and pepper, and will need things added to it to make it into something. Stocks also are commonly reduced to a more concentrated form for the addition to other food items. Both can be the basis for soups, stews, etc. I tend to make broth, as I want the option to be able to drink it without adding anything.

    I think you can eat the fat off of the top of your broth, if you are using grass fed beef bones. It is the mass produced, over drugged animals that carry most of the toxins in their fat tissue. I use a bit of it in cooking. My dogs love it too!

    You can simmer your bones as long as you want. Pressure cookers speed up the process, hence the shortened time. When I cook on the stove top, I plan 6-8 hours, when I use my crock pot, I let it go for 24 hours. The longer it cooks, the more minerals dissolve into your broth.

    Perhaps you can try to ingest a tsp of apple cider vinegar before you have your broth to aid in digestion. I don't have your problem, so I can't help you out too much.

    All in all, it sure sounds like you know what you're doing. I love my broth.

    Often for breakfast or lunch I heat it up in a mug and drop and entire egg or two in there, where they poach. What a wonderful meal! Don't forget to eat that lovely marrow. I also nibble on any bits left on the bones. So cave-like!

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    Quote Originally Posted by APPLEGIRL View Post
    Stock and broth are very similar, and most people use the terms interchangeably, and for practical purposes, that is fine. I do believe however, that in culinary terms, broth is a bit more complete and a bit richer. Made with perhaps more meat, seasoned with salt and pepper and can stand on it's own as a soup if desired, whereas stock may be a bit more plain and often isn't seasoned with salt and pepper, and will need things added to it to make it into something. Stocks also are commonly reduced to a more concentrated form for the addition to other food items. Both can be the basis for soups, stews, etc. I tend to make broth, as I want the option to be able to drink it without adding anything.

    I think you can eat the fat off of the top of your broth, if you are using grass fed beef bones. It is the mass produced, over drugged animals that carry most of the toxins in their fat tissue. I use a bit of it in cooking. My dogs love it too!

    You can simmer your bones as long as you want. Pressure cookers speed up the process, hence the shortened time. When I cook on the stove top, I plan 6-8 hours, when I use my crock pot, I let it go for 24 hours. The longer it cooks, the more minerals dissolve into your broth.

    Perhaps you can try to ingest a tsp of apple cider vinegar before you have your broth to aid in digestion. I don't have your problem, so I can't help you out too much.

    All in all, it sure sounds like you know what you're doing. I love my broth.

    Often for breakfast or lunch I heat it up in a mug and drop and entire egg or two in there, where they poach. What a wonderful meal! Don't forget to eat that lovely marrow. I also nibble on any bits left on the bones. So cave-like!
    thanks for the response!

    are there any other uses for the hard white fat on top other than cooking and dog food? i seem to get so much of the white fat when the stock cools that i just don't know what to do with it all!

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