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    DeltaCypher0's Avatar
    DeltaCypher0 is offline Senior Member
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    Fermentation noob.

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    Im interested in probiotics, and Im debating whether or not to click "checkout" in the store for the primal flora. Can anyone give me advice on making fermented foods that will work with low FODMAP? Or any other advice.

    Sent from my XT907 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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    Jimm's Avatar
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    Hi,
    I'm learning too and have dabbled quite a bit. I started a group to gather people on this subject:
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/group173.html

    I would start by Looking Up Sandor Katz. His books are great. He also has a large presence on Youtube.

    thanks

    ~Jimm

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    DeltaCypher0's Avatar
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    Thank you, I'll check out your link. Also, I'm glad you gave me an author, because I love reading books on new topics. Double thanks awarded to you!

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    DeltaCypher0's Avatar
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    Just watched Katz on YouTube. Can I ferment any vegetables? I've had some success with low FODMAP, and cabbage is high FODMAP. Does it matter if the vegetables I ferment are low/high FODMAP?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeltaCypher0 View Post
    Just watched Katz on YouTube. Can I ferment any vegetables? I've had some success with low FODMAP, and cabbage is high FODMAP. Does it matter if the vegetables I ferment are low/high FODMAP?
    All veggies contain lactic acid to some degree which is what you need to start the fermentation process. However, some veggies taste wonderful fermented (cabbage, green beans, cucumbers, broccoli etc.) others, (like kale, spinach, etc.) do not taste so good when fermented. If you look at local food traditions and customs when it comes to fermented foods, you'll learn quickly which veggies are good for fermenting and which ones are better off cooked or eaten raw.
    "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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    Jimm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    If you look at local food traditions and customs when it comes to fermented foods, you'll learn quickly which veggies are good for fermenting and which ones are better off cooked or eaten raw.
    Which should take you toward Sally Fallon & the Weston A. Price Foundation.

    Glad to be of help!

    ~Jimm

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    i don't like to do extensive reading >_< and am wondering if it's possible to use store-bought saurkraut for fermenting other veggies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by graceH View Post
    i don't like to do extensive reading >_< and am wondering if it's possible to use store-bought saurkraut for fermenting other veggies.
    Generally no, as most store bought is pasteurized. The pasteurization kills the bacteria that would be useful as a starter. However, you don't need a starter with Lactic acid fermentation, as the bacteria on the veggies will do the work for you. As you don't want to read, check out this video from Sandor Katz as to how to get started:

    Fermenting Vegetables with Sandor Katz - YouTube
    turquoisepassion - I MUST KNOW ALL THE THINGS

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    I'm not sure but I've read that many people can tolerate veggies fermented that they can't handle as well raw.

    I was also experimenting w FODMAP elimination as I saw certain foods causing me GI distress, like almonds (almond meal, so tasty, so sad) or cabbage (excessive cabbage I put in soup).

    Anyway, I found I started having more seemingly related food/GI issues after eliminating the fermented cabbage so I've added that back into my diet.

    BTW, I do wild fermentation now (bc I'm out of starter packs) but I saw greater improvement in health when using the starter packs (Body Ecology brand).
    Carrots are good fermented

    Another question for anyone reading this thread:
    I have tons of brine left over from my last batch of CV (red cabbage, garlic & carrots). I usually drink the brine or use as a dressing but wonder if I can use this to start a new batch?
    Thx!
    K

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    Quote Originally Posted by graceH View Post
    i don't like to do extensive reading >_< and am wondering if it's possible to use store-bought saurkraut for fermenting other veggies.
    Probably not a great idea to use store bought fermented stuff as a starter. It's really not all that hard. And you're going to have to do a little reading. Sorry.

    For fermenting Cabbage.

    10 grams of salt per kg of cabbage.

    For other vegetables that have less of their own water, use a 2% mixture

    for 1 cup water, add ~5 grams of salt (make sure to submerge the vegetables)

    For pickles 3.5% works pretty good - 1 cup of water, ~9 grams salt
    Some of you may die, but that is a risk I'm willing to take.

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