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  1. #31
    max219's Avatar
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    Also, almond flour is probably one of the worst flours to cook with since it's higher in PUFA, which oxidizes when heated. Wheat flour is usually always better unless the person really is gluten intolerant.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by max219 View Post
    I'm quoting Choco from another thread here. I saved ir cause I plan to make it eventually.

    asic vanilla ice cream. Sam Fuller

    2 cups heavy cream (1 cup reserved)
    2 cups whole milk (1 cup and 1/4 cup reserved)
    1 cup kefir
    8 extra large egg yolks (or 9 large)
    1 whole vanilla bean
    1 packet unflavored gelatin (next to the Jello, usually Knox brand)
    8 Rounded Tablespoons DARK brown sugar (1/2 cup), or to taste
    2 Tablespoons spiced rum (I like Sailor Jerry)
    4 Tablespoons plain 80 proof vodka

    1.) In a small bowl, sprinkle 1 packet of gelatin over 1/4 cup cold whole milk. Set aside to dissolve. Milk MUST be COLD.

    2.) In a medium-sized saucepot, heat 1 cup heavy cream and 1 cup whole milk over medium-low heat until steaming. Stir infrequently to keep milk from burning on the bottom.

    3.) In a heatproof mixing bowl, whisk 8 egg yolks until combined. Slowly pour the hot milk/cream mixture into the egg yolks, whisking constantly and about 1/4 cup at a time. IF YOU POUR THE HOT MILK INTO THE EGGS TOO FAST YOU WILL SCRAMBLE THEM! It is crucial you do it in a slow and steady stream, a little at a time, and whisking quickly to keep them from scrambled. Once the hot milk/cream is fully incorporated into the eggs, pour in 1 cup of cold milk to kill the heat. Add your (now soft) gelatin and whisk to combine.

    4.) Scrub the saucepot you heated the milk/cream in to remove the milk deposits from the bottom. Dry the pot. Return to medium-low heat and pour in the milk/cream/gelatin mixture (which I will now refer to as custard). Cut your vanilla bean in half lengthwise. Scrape the paste out of the bean and into the custard mixture. Throw the whole pod in there.

    5.) Add the brown sugar. Allow the mixture to slowly cook, stirring occasionally, until tiny bubbled form around the edges and the custard thickens til it coats the back of a metal spoon. Make sure 100% of the geltain melted and there are no lumps anywhere. Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature.

    6.) Once at room temp, pull out the vanilla bean and squeeze it to get all the goodness out and into the custard. Add 1 cup of kefir, whisk. Cover and place in fridge overnight or until completely chilled.

    7.) The next day, the gelatin will have completley set this into a pudding. With an electric hand mixture, whip it until completely smooth. Mix in rum and vodka. This will help keep it from freezing into a brick.

    8.) In a separate bowl, whip the remaining 1 cup heavy cream until stiff peaks form. Fold it into the custard with a spatula. Don't overmix - you want some air left in there.

    9.) Scrape the mixture into your ice cream maker and freeze according to directions.

    10.) Transfer to a container and freeze til set.

    NOTES: You can sub 1 cup of whole milk for the kefir but I prefer the light tang the kefir leaves. It adds depth. If you do not have vanilla beans, you can use 1 tablespoon REAL vanilla extract, but seriously, Amazon sells vanilla beans for around $25 for half a pound. They will last a very long time and you can make your own homemade extract out of cheap vodka, too. Sugar is also variable. Taste. I don't like very sweet ice cream. Adjust accordingly. THIS RECIPE WILL NOT FIT IN A 1.5 QUART ICE CREAM MAKER! YOU MUST HAVE A 2 QUART!
    Lovely. Thanks! Did you bookmark it for yourself?

    I should add that I've had better luck adding more gelatin. I now buy Great Lakes gelatin instead of the Knox packets since it's far more economical. If you use a tub of gelatin use 1 level Tablespoon or 2 heaping teaspoons, or two packets of Knox.
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  3. #33
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    Almond flour and almond butter with chocolate chips = awesome cookies. I actually don't know if thats all the ingredients. I think there might be some coconut butter in there as well. I don't cook em. I just eat em all. Either way very tasty stuff.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    Neither is white rice or black beans, but they are both superior to nuts in terms of healthfulness, and nuts are paleo. Paleo =/= good, neolithic =/= bad. Most of what's at heart with paleo is good advice, but there's a lot of bad info floating around out there.
    Disagree.

    Nuts are very nutrient dense and have some weird sort of undeserved stigma round here.

    Rice is completely nutrient deplete. Its fine if you need to get swolled I guess, but really offers nothing unless you are cooking it in nutrient dense bone broth.

    I don't mind beans so much. They have far more to offer than rice does anyhow.

    And actually, I mean if you believe in evolutionary theory and all, then yeah.... paleo = good. That may not necessarily follow that neolithic = bad... but it does make neolithic items suspect and puts a burden of proof for safety on newly introduced items.

    Almonds are better than rice

    However, the serum protein thiol concentration increased following the almond meal (15 14 mmol/L), indicating less oxidative protein damage, and decreased after the control bread, rice, and potato meals (−10 8 mmol/L), when data from these 3 meals were pooled (P = 0.021). The change in protein thiols was also negatively related to the postprandial incremental peak glucose (r = −0.29, n = 60 observations, P = 0.026) and peak insulin responses (r = −0.26, n = 60 observations, P = 0.046). Therefore, lowering postprandial glucose excursions may decrease the risk of oxidative damage to proteins. Almonds are likely to lower this risk by decreasing the glycemic excursion and by providing antioxidants. These actions may relate to mechanisms by which nuts are associated with a decreased risk of CHD.
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 09-16-2013 at 07:47 PM.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by oxide View Post
    Epic Faleo.

    Faleo (or Faileo) is faking baking by using grain substitutes, resulting in Failed Paleo. Sure, almond and coconut flour are not grains, but they are massive fat gram bombs. Even Choco would agree that they are massive calorie bombs, even leaving aside the phytic acids and other antinutrients. Is this family overweight? If so, they need to give up the idea of baking altogether. Because they ain't gonna lose weight on the Faleo diet. That's right -- no pancakes, no cupcakes, no bread, etc. Meat and veggies, eaten with a fork and spoon. That's the point.
    This is how I do paleo cause I prefer those foods. I prefer grilling chunks of meat and eating straight veggies and fruits and such in a way that I can recognize those items. I like food best this way.

    My wife on the other hand is the baker. She likes to bake so she has the almond, coconut, tapioca flours and all that crap. I eat it once in a while. Especially the almond cookies, but really you have a point. It really shouldn't make up the majority of your diet for sure.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    Oh boy. It takes me far too long...I don't have the strength. The short answer:

    2 cups heavy cream
    2 cups whole milk
    1 cup kefir or 1 cup whole milk (depends if you want the tang of kefir or not)
    7-9 egg yolks depending on size and richness you desire
    2 whole vanilla beans
    2 tablespoons vanilla extract
    2 tablespoons 70-100 proof spiced rum, such as Captain Morgan or Sailor Jerry
    2 tablespoons 80 proof vodka
    1 tablespoon gelatin
    sweetener of choice

    That's a good start for you.


    Quote Originally Posted by max219 View Post
    I'm quoting Choco from another thread here. I saved ir cause I plan to make it eventually.

    asic vanilla ice cream. Sam Fuller

    2 cups heavy cream (1 cup reserved)
    2 cups whole milk (1 cup and 1/4 cup reserved)
    1 cup kefir
    8 extra large egg yolks (or 9 large)
    1 whole vanilla bean
    1 packet unflavored gelatin (next to the Jello, usually Knox brand)
    8 Rounded Tablespoons DARK brown sugar (1/2 cup), or to taste
    2 Tablespoons spiced rum (I like Sailor Jerry)
    4 Tablespoons plain 80 proof vodka

    1.) In a small bowl, sprinkle 1 packet of gelatin over 1/4 cup cold whole milk. Set aside to dissolve. Milk MUST be COLD.

    2.) In a medium-sized saucepot, heat 1 cup heavy cream and 1 cup whole milk over medium-low heat until steaming. Stir infrequently to keep milk from burning on the bottom.

    3.) In a heatproof mixing bowl, whisk 8 egg yolks until combined. Slowly pour the hot milk/cream mixture into the egg yolks, whisking constantly and about 1/4 cup at a time. IF YOU POUR THE HOT MILK INTO THE EGGS TOO FAST YOU WILL SCRAMBLE THEM! It is crucial you do it in a slow and steady stream, a little at a time, and whisking quickly to keep them from scrambled. Once the hot milk/cream is fully incorporated into the eggs, pour in 1 cup of cold milk to kill the heat. Add your (now soft) gelatin and whisk to combine.

    4.) Scrub the saucepot you heated the milk/cream in to remove the milk deposits from the bottom. Dry the pot. Return to medium-low heat and pour in the milk/cream/gelatin mixture (which I will now refer to as custard). Cut your vanilla bean in half lengthwise. Scrape the paste out of the bean and into the custard mixture. Throw the whole pod in there.

    5.) Add the brown sugar. Allow the mixture to slowly cook, stirring occasionally, until tiny bubbled form around the edges and the custard thickens til it coats the back of a metal spoon. Make sure 100% of the geltain melted and there are no lumps anywhere. Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature.

    6.) Once at room temp, pull out the vanilla bean and squeeze it to get all the goodness out and into the custard. Add 1 cup of kefir, whisk. Cover and place in fridge overnight or until completely chilled.

    7.) The next day, the gelatin will have completley set this into a pudding. With an electric hand mixture, whip it until completely smooth. Mix in rum and vodka. This will help keep it from freezing into a brick.

    8.) In a separate bowl, whip the remaining 1 cup heavy cream until stiff peaks form. Fold it into the custard with a spatula. Don't overmix - you want some air left in there.

    9.) Scrape the mixture into your ice cream maker and freeze according to directions.

    10.) Transfer to a container and freeze til set.

    NOTES: You can sub 1 cup of whole milk for the kefir but I prefer the light tang the kefir leaves. It adds depth. If you do not have vanilla beans, you can use 1 tablespoon REAL vanilla extract, but seriously, Amazon sells vanilla beans for around $25 for half a pound. They will last a very long time and you can make your own homemade extract out of cheap vodka, too. Sugar is also variable. Taste. I don't like very sweet ice cream. Adjust accordingly. THIS RECIPE WILL NOT FIT IN A 1.5 QUART ICE CREAM MAKER! YOU MUST HAVE A 2 QUART!
    Cheers! Owe you both.

    I've made my own before with just coconut milk and egg yolks, or a dairy based one for one serving with just cottage cheese and frozen berries, but have been looking for more varieties.
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    This is how I do paleo cause I prefer those foods. I prefer grilling chunks of meat and eating straight veggies and fruits and such in a way that I can recognize those items. I like food best this way.

    My wife on the other hand is the baker. She likes to bake so she has the almond, coconut, tapioca flours and all that crap. I eat it once in a while. Especially the almond cookies, but really you have a point. It really shouldn't make up the majority of your diet for sure.
    LOL.

    This is pretty much me and my girlfriend's relationship all over. Never eat gluten-free stuff, here, but she loves to bake, so every time she does... sure, I'll give it a try. She's pretty good, too; her raspberry tarts are a killer :P
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  8. #38
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    Give the coconut flour a second chance for your pancakes. I make banana pancakes for my daughter regularly.
    Mash a ripe banana
    Whisk in two eggs
    Mix in two tablespoons coconut flour
    Optional: I also add pumpkin pie spice and vanilla.
    I cook them in a cast iron skillet that is well coated in oil.
    She eats them ALL, and I am glad they are mostly egg and banana and not some Aunt Jemima Garbage.

    There is an organic coconut flour that is very good. I almost got turned off to it early on too, as I didn't really care for Bob's Red Mill Coconut Flour.

    As for Paleo baking, I think it can be a good transition to the lifestyle. Early on I ate a lot of almond based bread, but I haven't made it in months. I think it did slow my fat loss when I was eating it.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Disagree.

    Nuts are very nutrient dense and have some weird sort of undeserved stigma round here.
    I disagree. Nuts are not nutrient dense. They have nutrition, yes, but they are extremely calorically dense and have next to no water content, unlike meats, vegetables, fruits and tubers. They are in general more calorically dense than chocolate, making them more fattening than most desserts. Of which, their fats are very poor quality, their protein isn't very available for the body and they are extremely high in phytic acid. Almonds alone have ten times the phytic acid content of oats, which are one of the most phytate-rich grains. They are also highly allergenic and contain similar mycotoxins that grains contain. I'd say most grains are much more healthful than nuts, and DEFINITELY most beans are since beans are far more nutritious and contain less lectins and phytates.

    Most know I'm extremely anti-oat. However, let's compare 1,000kcal of oats to almonds.



    Firstly, you can consume 49% more oats per weight to equal almonds calorically. This makes almonds almost 50% more calorie dense than a lowly dried grain, which is an impressively poor showing.

    Nutritionally, the winners are:

    Oats
    Protein
    Vitamin B-6
    Iron
    Manganese
    Pantothenic Acid
    Phosphorus
    Thiamin
    Zinc

    Almonds
    Vitamin E
    Copper
    Niacin
    Selenium

    Magnesium is a wash.

    Where almonds do win: copper is ample in oats as well, selenium is barely significant and Vitamin E is only present from keeping the large quantity of omega 6 in the almond from going rancid, so the oats don't need Vitamin E because of their paltry (by comparison) fat content. Not only are oats significantly less calorie dense, they are also significantly more nutrient dense.

    But what about bioavailability?

    According to the Weston A. Price Foundation, oats are 0.42-1.16% phytate per dry weight and almonds are 1.35-3.22% phytate per dry weight. This makes almonds about 3 times richer in phytic acid than oats. So not only are oats more nutritious, but the body can better assimilate said nutrients.

    That's a black eye for almonds considering they are possibly the most nutritious nut. Compare oats to something like a macadamia or walnut and the losses are even worse.

    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Rice is completely nutrient deplete. Its fine if you need to get swolled I guess, but really offers nothing unless you are cooking it in nutrient dense bone broth.
    I'm 50/50 with you here. I'm guessing you, along with most people, have never actually looked at the nutrient profile of white rice. Now, I chose both enriched and unenriched rice so there are no complainers - even though enriched is what is typically eaten, but I digress.



    I agree that white rice isn't nutritious, but it isn't empty starch, either. It's not empty calories like something completely asinine like bulletproof coffee. It has some nutrient value, and while it isn't as nutritious as almonds calorie-per-calorie on paper, it also ranks nearly zero on the toxin and anti-nutrient scale. Almonds are loaded with phytate, lectins, irritating fiber, potentially toxic fats and allergens. White rice is clean. While almonds may have greater nutrient density, I do not believe the small amount of added nutrition outweighs the big downsides. Therefore, I consider white rice to be more healthful than nuts.


    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    I don't mind beans so much. They have far more to offer than rice does anyhow.

    And actually, I mean if you believe in evolutionary theory and all, then yeah.... paleo = good. That may not necessarily follow that neolithic = bad... but it does make neolithic items suspect and puts a burden of proof for safety on newly introduced items.

    Almonds are better than rice

    However, the serum protein thiol concentration increased following the almond meal (15 14 mmol/L), indicating less oxidative protein damage, and decreased after the control bread, rice, and potato meals (−10 8 mmol/L), when data from these 3 meals were pooled (P = 0.021). The change in protein thiols was also negatively related to the postprandial incremental peak glucose (r = −0.29, n = 60 observations, P = 0.026) and peak insulin responses (r = −0.26, n = 60 observations, P = 0.046). Therefore, lowering postprandial glucose excursions may decrease the risk of oxidative damage to proteins. Almonds are likely to lower this risk by decreasing the glycemic excursion and by providing antioxidants. These actions may relate to mechanisms by which nuts are associated with a decreased risk of CHD.
    I take a more nuanced approach. Paleo is a great starting point, but I prefer to dig in deeper and refine it down to what's optimal for myself and most others. I don't do beans, but I'm not vehemently against them. I think there are more delicious foods to fill my calories that offer a lot more health benefits, so I cut them out. They're bland poverty food, and yea, they do make me gassy so that's probably a negative somewhere. Although refried beans are pretty damn delicious. Ah well.

    Did you read this study?

    Protein thiol concentration, as a marker of protein oxidative damage and serum postprandial TAC, did not differ during or among the individual treatments as assessed by the response curves over the 4 h (data not shown).

    The change in the serum protein thiol concentration in response to the almond meal (15 14 mmol/L) was greater (P = 0.021) than that following the control bread, potato, and rice meals when the data from these 3 treatments were combined (−10 8 mmol/L). This suggests less postprandial protein damage after consuming almonds. The almond meal did not differ from the combined meals for TAC (data not shown)
    There is NO INFORMATION ON THE MEALS. We know the meal containing almond meal was "balanced for fat, protein, and total energy with the almond meal by the addition of fat (unsalted butter; Gay Lea, Gay Lea Foods) and protein (medium cheddar cheese; Black Diamond, Parmalat)."

    So, the meal containing almond meal was some unknown caloric content of almond meal, unsalted butter and cheddar cheese. The meal you're comparing that to is some unknown caloric content of "parboiled rice (Uncle Bens Converted, Mars); and instant mashed potatoes (McCain, McCain Foods)."

    And your conclusion is that almond meal is healthier than white rice? White rice was never consumed, only a mixture of (potentially flavored) parboiled rice and instant mashed potatoes against a meal of ground almonds, butter and cheese. Maybe this study shows that real cheddar cheese is better than boxed powdered potatoes with 20 ingredients on the label? Maybe this shows that the milkfat in the butter and cheese helped mitigate the unhealthy fats from the almonds and gave it a leg up over fake potatoes and Wonder Bread? Huh?

    You have to try harder than that.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 09-16-2013 at 09:19 PM.
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    This is how I do paleo cause I prefer those foods. I prefer grilling chunks of meat and eating straight veggies and fruits and such in a way that I can recognize those items. I like food best this way.

    My wife on the other hand is the baker. She likes to bake so she has the almond, coconut, tapioca flours and all that crap. I eat it once in a while. Especially the almond cookies, but really you have a point. It really shouldn't make up the majority of your diet for sure.
    This is pretty much exactly how it is for me and my wife. I won't bake these goodies all by myself but she will on occasion and it's hard to pass up.
    "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

    People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

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