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    Today's Fiber Blog

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    Loved today's blog on fiber--Mark got it mostly right and at least trivialized the crap Konny was spreading last week. Did you notice his recommendation of raw plantains and green bananas? What do you supposed that was about?

    I posted this comment, but it went straight to mod, probably because of the link:

    Yep, to deny that our gut flora need proper care and feeding puts one in the dark ages.

    The only problem I have with your post, Mark, are the terms ‘soluble’ and ‘insoluble’ as descriptors for ‘fermentable’ and ‘non-fermentable’. There is soluble fiber that are non-fermentable, and insoluble fiber that is fermentable. Also, some soluble, fermentable fiber is targeted more by pathogenic bacteria.

    If we look at the FODMAPs, some of them are good ‘gut-bug’ food, and some are not.

    Better descriptors for fiber recommendations would probably be ‘bifidogenic’, ‘butyrogenic’, or just ‘prebiotic’ fiber. These terms all relate to how beneficial gut microbes react to the food source.

    Termed as I described, it would be clearer to see that the most important fibers probably are inulin, pectin, oligosaccharides, gums, mucins, and resistant starch.

    Your recommendation of: “stuff like raw onion and garlic, leeks, jerusalem artichokes, dandelion greens, raw plantains and green bananas” gets us inulin and resistant starch. I’d like to give a shout-out here for properly prepared (fermented) legumes, raw potato and tapioca starch, parbroiled/converted rice, and…a daily apple — see Friendly bacteria love the humble apple


    Read more: Dear Mark: What’s the Deal with Fiber? | Mark's Daily Apple

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    way to go

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    I am very interested in the discussion! I am trying to optimize the digestion, and I gotta say that I am not a fan of raw green veggies eating in public. And I rarely like salads, particularly without tubers.

    I am also wondering if one needs to eat all prepared grains cold to get the resistant starch benefit, not just rice (I mean buckwheat and millet).
    Last edited by Leida; 09-09-2013 at 09:11 AM.
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    Nice dude, I hope it gets approved.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    I am very interested in the discussion! I am trying to optimize the digestion, and I gotta say that I am not a fan of raw green veggies eating in public. And I rarely like salads, particularly without tubers.

    I am also wondering if one needs to eat all prepared grains cold to get the resistant starch benefit, not just rice (I mean buckwheat and millet).
    Leida - Here is a link to a Master RS List: RS Contents in Food


    You will probably be surprised at the paltry amounts in most foods, and by surprisingly high amounts in others. One incredibly rich source is raw, green plantains. The only way I have found to make them edible, however, is to cut into thin slices and dehydrate or air dry. They can be salted or spiced to taste while still moist, hot pepper, cinnamon, whatever, they have the texture and consistency of Saltine crackers when dried. 1 large plantain will yield about 40g of RS, so eating 1/4 to 1/2 a plantain a day gives you all the RS you'd ever need.

    Legumes are another great source of RS and fermentable fibers. If you soak them for 24 hours, then bring to a hard boil for 10 minutes and then simmer on low heat for 2-3 hours, all the bad stuff is gone, leaving good fibers and RS behind. Cook them like this, then freezing and reheating will double the available RS.

    If these don't suit you, boil and chill potatoes for some RS, but it would be hard to get 5g/day doing this. Also, bananas as green as you can stand have great RS. Fully green, they have about 30g--it disappears completely when fully ripe, so stages inbetween fully green and fully ripe have diminishing RS returns.

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    Hey Otzi. Great and interesting post. Not to throw a curve in here, but did the dispute about whether or not the butyrate in butter reaches the colon ever get resolved?

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    Quote Originally Posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
    Hey Otzi. Great and interesting post. Not to throw a curve in here, but did the dispute about whether or not the butyrate in butter reaches the colon ever get resolved?
    That dispute will never get resolved. The VLC crowd will say you don't need butyrate from gut bacteria, the gut bacteria loving crowd will say you do need it. They will point to Inuits, we will point to published studies. It's an impossible debate. I've learned to live with it and won't argue about it.

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    Thank you, Otzi. I am mostly wondering about millet and buckwheat, rather than the exotics like plantains but it could be interesting to try them in dehydrator (cheaper atm than the yum). I gave up on soaking and cooking legumes a while back for the lack of time. I might try again.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    Thank you, Otzi. I am mostly wondering about millet and buckwheat, rather than the exotics like plantains but it could be interesting to try them in dehydrator (cheaper atm than the yum). I gave up on soaking and cooking legumes a while back for the lack of time. I might try again.
    Almost all nuts, grains, and seeds contain 5-10g of RS per 100g of dried product. 100g of buckwheat is about 1/2 cup before cooking and contains about 350 calories for 5-10g of RS. A large banana has about 120 calories when fully ripe. Eat it when it is still green and you will get 10-30g of RS depending on ripeness.

    That's kind of always been the problem with RS. It's hard to get in meaningful quantities from regular foods without a high calorie cost. Thinking outside the box a bit can easily quadruple your rewards.

    The average RS intake in the westernized world is 3-5g per day, mostly from cereal grains. An LC paleo diet typically yields even less than the SAD, but with the inclusion of green bananas, dried plantains, legumes, cold rice and potatoes, this can easily be up to 30g per day without many extra calories. In fact, many are using raw potato starch and tapioca starch to provide measured doses of RS. These starches have about 8g per TBS, but must be consumed in raw state as in added to a smoothie, milk, kefir, or yogurt etc...

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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    That dispute will never get resolved. The VLC crowd will say you don't need butyrate from gut bacteria, the gut bacteria loving crowd will say you do need it. They will point to Inuits, we will point to published studies. It's an impossible debate. I've learned to live with it and won't argue about it.
    Thanks. I will live with the ambiguity too. Maybe take the belts and suspenders approach, which means adding some resistant starch in some form.

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