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  1. #81
    DinoHunter's Avatar
    DinoHunter is offline Senior Member
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    Personally I dont give my dogs rawhide and would say if you do, DO NOT give it when your not right there with him, Ive had 2 clients that lost there dog due to rawhide and a couple more that have had close calls. The rawhide becomes very soft & pliable with chewing and then gets stuck in the throat when they try to swallow it.
    Theres also the problem with rawhides coming from china that have some nasty chemicals used in the processing so if you do use them, make sure their not coming from China
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  2. #82
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    Great to hear he is doing better . The pigs ears good and antlers. Bully sticks too. No to rawhide though.
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  3. #83
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    Great to hear the yoghurt helped

    I keep a large bag of taste of the wild in case of emergencies, that and sojourn are probably the only kibble I would feed to the monsters. I find it more expensive than feeding raw though and their stools are a lot bigger, softer and smellier than on raw but still better than on standard dog food.
    Last edited by Misabi; 09-12-2013 at 01:17 AM.
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  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clymb View Post
    I'm using Taste of the Wild grain-free puppy food.

    I gave him some yogurt and his diarrhea is gone! I didn't leave him in the crate today, I left him in my room with the door open and bought a little gate to put at the end of the hallway. He was totally fine when I got home and didn't have any accidents. He even played in the yard with the other dog today! All of a sudden he's doing great, I don't know if it's because his diarrhea is over or what. I put one of his little beds in the kitchen and he actually will sleep there while I eat or do stuff on the computer. We took a nap together earlier too. Only bad thing is he seems to be getting even MORE skittish while on walks. He hunkers down in the middle of it and I have to pick him up and pull him to get going again. Once he gets going he doesn't pull or anything.

    I got him some rawhide. People are saying that's too dangerous for his stomach? I read into it and I guess it's a small risk. Are pig ears/feet or antlers a better options? He likes the ears.
    That is wonderful!

    Please no rawhide. It can become gooey and sticky and wadded into a ball which gets lodged into their throats or can cause blockage. I saw this first hand last summer with my own dog. A foster dog arrived with a rawhide and I stuck it in the garage on a box and forgot about it. My lab found it (of course). I found her choking in the back yard... she was able to barf up a baseball size wad of rawhide but not before scaring the crap out of me and herself. She was drooling and wide eyed and unable to breathe. ANTLERS all the way. US harvested or Canadian. Expensive, but worth it. Pig ears are smelly and often chemical laden, too. Raw grass fed femurs are good, too. You probably would need to really clean them out, though, because the fat could cause more diarrhea.

    The skittishness on the walk will take quite a while I can imagine. Remember, his entire life used to be a back yard. Try to avoid high traffic areas for now and keep the walks short if he gets too nervous.

    Sounds like a good boy.

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  5. #85
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    Thanks for the advice guys! I have a new question: Obie finally is playing and getting along with the other dogs. One of them is agressive about one thing--his rawhides that the roommate gives him. Well he snuck into my room and stole Obie's rawhide. Obie came near him and they got in a little tiff. Now when the dog comes near Obie at all, he gets scared and snaps and barks. Will they get along again, or is there a way I can teach Obie not to do this? My roommate doesn't discipline the other dog well. He has to be put in his crate all the time or he opens doors and the fridge and gets into stuff. He barks a lot too, really loudly.

    And I'll get rid of Obie's rawhides now, don't wanna risk that.

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clymb View Post
    Thanks for the advice guys! I have a new question: Obie finally is playing and getting along with the other dogs. One of them is agressive about one thing--his rawhides that the roommate gives him. Well he snuck into my room and stole Obie's rawhide. Obie came near him and they got in a little tiff. Now when the dog comes near Obie at all, he gets scared and snaps and barks. Will they get along again, or is there a way I can teach Obie not to do this? My roommate doesn't discipline the other dog well. He has to be put in his crate all the time or he opens doors and the fridge and gets into stuff. He barks a lot too, really loudly.

    And I'll get rid of Obie's rawhides now, don't wanna risk that.
    In a multi-dog household I find it much safer to only give "high value" treats when dogs are separated and highly supervised. Any chance you could convince your roommate that he is setting up for a huge fight by giving his dog rawhide without supervising him the entire time he eats it?

    I normally find walking as a group to be a great way to get dogs back on track after a little disagreement. Not sure if that would work for your guy given how nervous he is. They should be fine with time as long as they are not put in the position to need to fight again.

    It must be hard to live with someone who doesn't take good care of his pet. I had a house mate who wasn't the greatest caretaker of his chickens and it about killed me! A couldn't handle that at all if it was a dog.
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  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clymb View Post
    Thanks for the advice guys! I have a new question: Obie finally is playing and getting along with the other dogs. One of them is agressive about one thing--his rawhides that the roommate gives him. Well he snuck into my room and stole Obie's rawhide. Obie came near him and they got in a little tiff. Now when the dog comes near Obie at all, he gets scared and snaps and barks. Will they get along again, or is there a way I can teach Obie not to do this? My roommate doesn't discipline the other dog well. He has to be put in his crate all the time or he opens doors and the fridge and gets into stuff. He barks a lot too, really loudly.

    And I'll get rid of Obie's rawhides now, don't wanna risk that.
    You might need to establish yourself as the leader over your roommate's dog if he/she isn't going to do any of the training or discipline. Keep the treats up and away for only supervised times like someone else said. I like the idea of the community walk to teach the dogs manners and pack order. It really is true that any time you have more than one dog in the house you have a hierarchy there that can sometimes be subtle and difficult to understand.

    Let's also hope Obie doesn't become a barker by listening to this other dog! That would drive me insane.

    This transition will take weeks, and actually could take months when you put another dog into the mix. It is nice to see that Obie is gaining some confidence and comfort. You are doing some good things. Keeping him mentally and physically busy will be the key to his happiness (and yours). Some people create games for dogs like this... hiding things around the house for them to find and retrieve can be fun for them. Do you have a frisbee? See if he is a natural. Enroll in agility class if you have the time. A puppy socialization class might be a great option for you two in several weeks. You could get some dog time, some training and some behavior tips all in one class.

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  8. #88
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    2 things to remember about dogs:

    1. Dogs are territorial, it's possible that the other dog sees Obie as invading his territory.

    2. They are pack animals, so as phaselow said it could be a pecking order issue. Just because the other dog isn't yours it doesn't mean that the dogs won't see then as being part of the same pack (if not now, but after a while) and you do need them both to see you as the pack leader.

    Just as importantly though is fire the dogs to know their place in the pack and unfortunately that can't be as equals. Generally dogs will work this out between themselves and that may include some scraps for one to assert their dominance over the other, but you can also do some things to help them along.


    I had real issues with my dog's which started when the youngest was around 5 months old. He came to us at 8 weeks old straight from his mum, the first to leave the litter (and as a result he imprinted on us very strongly) when our girl was around 1.5 yrs old. We got her at 5 months old, she was the last of her litter to find a home and had been away from her mum for a couple of months by then. While she had always been very loving she's also always been a lot more independent.

    For those first few months the boy was with us everything was fine, they played together lots and we treated them equally as you would with children. Little did we know the problems that this would cause down the road.

    After a few months it was like she realised that he was going to be bigger and stronger and she needed to dominate him while he was small enough to make sure he knew his place. Unfortunately, we were still treating them like or furkids instead of the pack animals they are. So we would make sure they both got cuddles and even though she would push him or if the way to get attention and he would walk away looking sad, we would bring him back and let them both. If she was hogging the toys, food or water same thing "share with your little brother, greedy".

    Then the fighting started. At first small scraps, usually over food or toys, or after a cuddle session. Some of her dominant behavior was cute or funny, like when we'd get to a road out in a walk and knew to sit and he was still learning. I'd tell him to sit and then wait until he did so to reward him, but if he didn't listen she would pay his bum with her paw to make him sit just like how I'd taught her to sit (seriously, I wouldn't have believed it if I hadn't seen it on multiple occasions). On other occasions not so cute, like a time he decided to try to get on the couch, which she knew want allowed and she attacked him to tell him "no".

    These scuffles are all part of the natural learning and pack order orientation that would take place in a pack or even a litter if pups stayed with their family, but how we react to them and behave afterwards influences their future behaviour and the pack structure.

    It wasn't until they had a major fight one day while I was at work, which lasted for about an hour according to the neighbours who called the dog patrol, that I took a serious look into dog behaviour and realised all of the mistakes we'd been making. 1st thing we had to do was reassert ourselves as the alphas, which we did in a number of ways such as; making sure we always ate first and they could see us (even if this was just dishing up their food and putting a cookie in a plate next to their bowls and me eating that while the day and watched then putting their bowls down, only giving affection when we decided and not when they demanded it, (and probably the oddest one) sutting in their favorite spot and not moving for them, or making them move so you could sit there.

    This worked pretty quickly, so next we also had to establish their order in the pack.There are a number of queues to look for to help with this, sometimes they all make sense, sometimes they don't. For instance, if two dogs at walking towards the doorway the one that gives away is said to be the submissive. But my girls always gives way to everyone and anyone, whereas the boy just charges around the house without a care unless you tell him to slowdown then he thinks about it and gives way to you. So from that you would think he was the dominant of the 2, but another example is if he's getting cuddles and she walked in the room he would get uncomfortable and want to walk away or she would barge him out of the way, or whenever they would play (or really) fight, he would submit quickly, this was real dominance. The only exception was the big brawl, whet the kids next door said she wouldn't leave him alone even though he kept submitting and it looked like he eventually just decided that he was bigger and stronger and didn't need to take her crap anymore. Unfortunately, she is just so strong willed that they would fight until she was exhausted at which point he would walk away to luck his wounds, but as soon as she'd rated a little she would go at him again!

    It was apparent that my boy was not to dog out of the two, so we had to make sure we reinforced that instead of treating hin add higher or even equal in the pack. She would be fed first after we'd eaten, she would get cuddles first, drink as much add she wanted and he'd have to wait, etc.


    Things changed within a week or two of us doing this. He was so more relaxed and not in edge because he didn't have to keep an eye or for when she was going to unleash her next beating for some perceived pecking order violation (even though we'd caused him to do it) and she relaxed too, like she no longer felt the responsibility to have to tell him off all the time.

    The new behaviours need tobe performed consistently, which is the key. Everyone in the house will need to be consistent, or they may behave five when you're around and completely different when you're not. Pack structure is not static though, even when you are consistent. As dogs age, get sick of injured, you go on holiday or have visitors come to stay, these can all affect where the dogs see themselves in the pack.

    My dog's are big powerful animals, so if there is any aggression it can get messy fast, and some will say that it is therefore more important for me to maintain the oak structure, but I think it's important with any dog. It will make them easier to train, more relaxed dogs.

    9 times out 10 fights are for show, lots of growling and gnashing of yeah until one backs down or the dominant one mounts the other, but that one in ten will be a doozy. I think it's important to learn how to break up a fight safely even if your dog is the cutest least aggressive dog on the planet, as you never know what another dog is going to do. That is something I wish we'd learnt early on as it would have saved pain and money for both the dogs and us. We've both been unintentionally injured trying to break them up when they were young (they are now 7 and 8.5 yo and the big brawl was 5 or 6 years ago) and of course they've both had more than a few stitches.

    Wow, sorry for the long post! I'd only meant to highlight those two points about pack structure and territory :-)
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  9. #89
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    Thanks for the post, Misabi! I figured Obie was just getting aggressive because I give him so much attention and he's not fixed yet. He's also getting a little possessive of me--for instance, we're sitting alone on the couch together, another dog comes up and he snarls and snaps at them. I've been trying to get him to stop this but it's not working well. I had been trying to show him that I like the other dogs so he doesn't see them as a threat to me, but I suppose this is wrong, according to the above post?

  10. #90
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    Any advice on Obie now being a bit possessive abotu food?? Just with the other dogs. He's fine with people with everything, just not dogs.

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