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Thread: Old Schools ' NO Bull$hit ' Training Discussion Thread ! page 5

  1. #41
    not on the rug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
    I've got a janky shoulder, and normal OHP really hurts most of the time. The best thing I've done is to do presses using a barbell that I ram into a corner, then add weight to the end I'm holding, then press that. This changes the angle a little but gives you all of the benefits with much less impingement. You're leaning forward a bit and it also protects the lower back. I do most of my pressing this way, with great results.

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    Great idea. I used to do those all the time actually. I stuck the end of a bb in an old glove to protect the walls. Maybe I will give those a whirl again
    I have a lot of hard miles on my body from before I realized I'm not 100% invulnerable. Now I just think I'm 75% invulnerable. -Mr. Anthony

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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by not on the rug View Post
    Great idea. I used to do those all the time actually. I stuck the end of a bb in an old glove to protect the walls. Maybe I will give those a whirl again
    I actually use this method for my one arm bent over rows, far more control than using a Dumbbell.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldSchhool View Post
    I actually use this method for my one arm bent over rows, far more control than using a Dumbbell.
    Do you kneel on a bench like you would with a db?
    I have a lot of hard miles on my body from before I realized I'm not 100% invulnerable. Now I just think I'm 75% invulnerable. -Mr. Anthony

    Give me a spouse/life-partner who I don't want to punch in the throat when she talks. -Canio6

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldSchhool View Post
    I've heard others mention that the landmine type presses work for them as well !

    Here is an interesting article about the downside to presses, I don't always agree with everything this guy says but he does make a few good points here.

    Contention in the Overhead Press Arena | Doug Brignole - Exercise and Biomechanics
    Here are two by Bill Starr talking about the press. The first one even talks about Doug Brignole specifically:

    The Olympic-Style Press

    The Quest for a Stronger Overhead Press

  5. #45
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    Overhead pressing is a bit overrated for general fitness goals IMO, because front deltoids, triceps and core get plenty of stimuli from other movements such as benching, curling and squats. A better solution could be high pulls or upright rowing with a vide grip, that develop strength in lateral deltoids much better than OHP. Most people are getting plenty of strength in their anterior and posterior delts from pushing and pulling, and the weak link is usually the lateral movement of the arm. I still do overhead press behind neck though, but they are probably overkill since I also do a lot of other pressing…
    "When a person is poor in knowledge then he is rich in ignorance and stubbornness, carefully heeding around the little that he knows ..."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbag View Post
    I still do overhead press behind neck though, but they are probably overkill since I also do a lot of other pressing…
    It's odd that you choose not to do overhead presses, but do behind the neck overhead presses. Behind the neck presses are the ones considered harmful to shoulders.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    It's odd that you choose not to do overhead presses, but do behind the neck overhead presses. Behind the neck presses are the ones considered harmful to shoulders.

    I don't think it's odd at all, considering the source

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    It's odd that you choose not to do overhead presses, but do behind the neck overhead presses. Behind the neck presses are the ones considered harmful to shoulders.
    Not if you have the sufficient flexiblity, and I have no problems in that aspect. Front press involves more front deltoids and I got plenty of that doing close arm bench press, flat or on a incline, and also all the front delt work from heavy curling and normal flat bench press...
    "When a person is poor in knowledge then he is rich in ignorance and stubbornness, carefully heeding around the little that he knows ..."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbag View Post
    Not if you have the sufficient flexiblity, and I have no problems in that aspect.
    You should look at what happens between your humerus and your AC joint when performing these.

  10. #50
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    If you guys have an adjustable bench that goes from horizontal to vertical you could put a slight angle on the back rest (say 11 o'clock) and do shoulder presses like that. At the top position the bar would be above your face and collar bones.

    I started bodybuilding when I was 19. I'm now 56. When I discovered how effective HIT was I never really looked back. I can see the value in stamina training (P90X style stuff) if that's a person's goal. In that time span by far the single most brutal HIT exercise I ever did was team-tug-of-war with pits dug in the dirt for solid footing (no slipping on grass). If you're putting out it can make you complete hypoglycemic in maybe 5 minutes...under 10 minutes for sure. I think it'd be insane to do that more than a few times per month.

    All through my 20s and 30s I could never get my bench better than 305lb. Then In my late 40s (47) I cut back to a 3-day/week split bodywork routine. I'd do chest, shoulders and triceps on Monday. Legs on Wednesday, Back and biceps on Friday. My bench press max went to 365lbs. I was warming up with 300. My problem was that I thought the body needed 2 times/week per body part; conventional wisdom

    I think once every 5-10 days is enough if the workout is HIT. When you start thinking of far more extra days of rest it opens the door to more experimenting in the routine...esp if you see the workout as a means to stimulate (max cortisol) an adaptive response (followed by a maximize anabolic phase). So I can see experimenting doing a full-body workout on Monday using heavy compound exercises (squats, bench, rows, deadlifts, pullups, military, that sort of stuff) and then following it up on Tuesday with maybe isolation exercise (leg curls, bicep curls, triceps extensions/push downs, shurgs, core, etc). Then give yourself the needed days off from weights to recover and adapt. The time in between is active recovery (however long that takes) involving walking, play, tossing the football/Frisbee, stretching, maybe a day of Tabata sprints (takes all of 4 minutes).

    the first Ms Universe, Rachael McLish, had what I think was good build for a women's bodybuild when not in comp shape
    https://www.google.com/search?q=rach...w=1280&bih=651 Cory Everson, too, Redirect Notice


    IIRC Steve Reeves trained for 1 hour 3 days per week and did not train his abs. In those days bodybuilders wouldn't train their abs because they wanted as small a waist as possible. Steve Reeve's Beginning Workout Routine for Building A Classic Physique - YouTube
    Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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