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Thread: What about mushrooms? page 3

  1. #21
    MEversbergII's Avatar
    MEversbergII is offline Senior Member
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    Ah, one quirk of this forum you'll get used to is attaching images - everything you attach has to be moderator approved. It takes forever. Most of use use imgur: the simple image sharer instead!

    M.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by natashik85 View Post
    So here they are. The mushrooms I got from the forest. I was able to find English names for some of them. And the photos are not mine this time because now there is nothing left to take a picture from. Next time I will
    The first one (Russule) I'm not familiar with, Russules are supposedly good to eat. We have one in my area called Fly Agaric that is deadly poison and looks very similar. Not sure if we have Russules also. This is the poison one:

    234px-Amanita_muscaria_UK.jpg

    The two unnamed ones are also boletes--the big brown one we call Birch Bolete and it's Ok to eat. The one in the picture is way past it's prime, though. The red color one on the bottom row is a red bolete, also called slimy bolete--they are also OK to eat. The ones you called brown caps, are also known as King Boletes and are the best to eat. Sometimes called Porcini, the pig, they are a delicacy wherever they are found. Chanterelles--one of the best mushrooms in the world!

    I'm jealous of your finds!
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by natashik85 View Post
    As to pollution or radiation – I really don’t know what is the fuss about. Here in Estonia we are not concerned with it at all. I was surprised to find posts about it. I guess it’s a big issue in US? I really don’t know though – so can’t really say for sure. But just so you know – more than a half of Estonia is pure forest. And I was gathering my mushrooms in a forest that is quite far from a nearest city. So I think I am good here.

    Thank you all once again.
    I would be concerned with cesium-134 and cesium-137. These isotopes are particularly of concern in certain species of wild mushrooms. Of course, no one talks about it.
    Do you have access to any governmental authority in Estonia that can verify on the status of radionuclides in wild mushrooms gathered in Estonian forests. You need to do your own research, no one is going to tell you this information openly.

    I am not in US so I don't know if it's a concern there.
    Last edited by KathyH; 09-04-2013 at 06:11 PM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by inesenite View Post
    Radiation is the last thing you should be worried about - and Chernobyl was very long ago I remember horror stories from my childhood about radioactive mushrooms in the aftermath of Chernobyl but we still ate them all the time. Besides, if radiation was a concern, even farmed mushrooms and other veggies would be affected.
    Enjoy your mushrooms! I am so jealous - it's been a while since I was back home in autumn for proper mushroom hunting...
    Do you understand the radioactive decay of all of the isotopes released during Chernobyl accident and its long lasting effects?
    Farming disperses isotopes and in undisturbed forest soil isotopes are being sponged out by certain species of wild mushrooms. Certain mushrooms bioaccumulate isotopes. Look at the Germans still testing wild boar meat every time it's being sold at the market and they are still finding that the amount of cesium-137 in their tissue often registers dozens of times beyond the recommended limit for consumption. And wild boars are known for consuming large quantities of mushrooms.
    You can choose to eat them but the concern is there.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    The first one (Russule) I'm not familiar with, Russules are supposedly good to eat. We have one in my area called Fly Agaric that is deadly poison and looks very similar. Not sure if we have Russules also. This is the poison one:

    234px-Amanita_muscaria_UK.jpg
    Hey, I know this one - the Fly-Agaric (the other translation I found is Amanita). If translate it from Russian is should be something like Fly-Plague
    I really am used to gather russules since the childhood and this is why I have no concern about them. There are indeed some poisonous variations of them and if you don't know - better not to take

    I think the one you see as past its prime is actually something else - I really struggled with finding proper English name for this one (maybe because I know it under a wrong name my grandma gave it). The way I call it if translated from Russian is Moss-mushroom. and It is actually supposed to look that way. The way to ID this one is fairly easy - you have to cut its leg and if the cut will turn blue-ish color in couple of minutes - that is the right mushroom
    Here is the link to photo from internet: http://files.germany.ru/wwwthreads/f...8-_____102.jpg

    Chanterelles-- ARE one of the best mushrooms in the world! My favorite ways to prepare them are:
    1. Fry some onions, add chanterelles, minced meat and cook until meat seems ready. Add spices and a bit of salt. Then add some sour cream and stir. Yummy.
    2. Fry onions, carrots, then add chanterelles and white or green cabbage (sliced to about the same pieces as mushrooms). Cook on medium heat. Add spices and a bit of salt. Enjoy and try not eat all of it at once

    So yep. Mushrooms are cool. Can't wait for the weekend to get away from city, escape to the forest and gather some more :P

  6. #26
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    I am visiting in my home country Latvia at the moment and this is the time for mushrooms! Of course, there is always concern about contamination, but I choose to believe they are OK in moderation. Just like fish from the ocean. Otherwise we would be left with so few food choices and such life would be so sad. We just do our best and the rest is in the higher power's hands
    Yes, the mushroom gathering culture is so strong in the Baltic states that we just can't give it up easily!

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by IvyBaby View Post
    I am visiting in my home country Latvia at the moment and this is the time for mushrooms! Of course, there is always concern about contamination, but I choose to believe they are OK in moderation. Just like fish from the ocean. Otherwise we would be left with so few food choices and such life would be so sad. We just do our best and the rest is in the higher power's hands
    Yes, the mushroom gathering culture is so strong in the Baltic states that we just can't give it up easily!
    So true! And why should we!!! This is as primal as it gets for us, modern people

  8. #28
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natashik85 View Post
    So true! And why should we!!! This is as primal as it gets for us, modern people
    You seriously need to see if there is any Inonotus Obliquus, also called chaga, in your area. They grow on Birch trees only and look like a big black lump of charcoal. The most powerful medicinal mushroom in the world! Read more here:

    Inonotus obliquus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    If you find one, hack it off the tree, dry it and grind to a powder. Then use to make tea. Well-known in Russia and China but hard for them to find. Amazing health properties.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    You seriously need to see if there is any Inonotus Obliquus, also called chaga, in your area. They grow on Birch trees only and look like a big black lump of charcoal. The most powerful medicinal mushroom in the world! Read more here:

    Inonotus obliquus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    If you find one, hack it off the tree, dry it and grind to a powder. Then use to make tea. Well-known in Russia and China but hard for them to find. Amazing health properties.
    Hey, Yes I know this one. I even have few on a Birch that grows near my grandmother's house:
    chaga.jpg
    I was remotely aware of Chaga's powers, but never really experienced them myself I shall try them sometime

  10. #30
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by natashik85 View Post
    Hey, Yes I know this one. I even have few on a Birch that grows near my grandmother's house:
    chaga.jpg
    I was remotely aware of Chaga's powers, but never really experienced them myself I shall try them sometime
    That's not Chaga, but a Birch Polypore--it is used as a medicinal mushroom (ground into tea, usually) but not as potent as Chaga. If you have those, you will also have Chaga--Chaga is pretty rare, like one in 5000 trees or 1-2 per acre. It looks like a big lump of coal dug into the side of the tree.

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