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Thread: Hiking!!! page 2

  1. #11
    kathleen's Avatar
    kathleen is offline Senior Member
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    Hiking is pretty much my go-to exercise; I do it almost every week (I live in a mountainous area, lots of hikes). I am also very far from being a vegetarian, hah.
    Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

    Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
    Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
    Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
    F/23/5'9"

    26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

  2. #12
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    Hi just to say I use the Merrel barefoot shoes for hiking as well and actually find I am less prone to aches and pains, although I haven't used them in Winter and did get one niggle in my foot after having walked for three days on the Wales coastal path, which is pretty tough going in parts. Generally my view is that the minimalist shoes are the best option and you just have to acclimatise to them. Not sure what others think.

  3. #13
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    Jennifla is online now Senior Member
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    I walk as often as possible, about 4 x per week. (When does a walk become a hike?) I used to go for a 8-12 miler once per week but I have no one to go with anymore and it's too boring to go by myself for that long. And a little dangerous. Today I walked a paved multi-use trail for 5 miles. I have started wearing a weighted vest that I made from an old denim vest. I had been wearing a backpack, but it is bulky and throws off my balance.

    I am fortunate to live near a variety of public lands with trails. When I go on unpaved trails, I always go barefoot now, and I love it. Our soil is either beach sand or rarely, mud, with no rocks. We have no real elevation, though.

    I have walked more this summer than any in the past, in spite of the heat. One of the coolest things about being Primal is that I require very little water. Has anyone else experienced this?
    As God is my witness, I'll never be hungry again.

  4. #14
    jdmt's Avatar
    jdmt is online now Junior Member
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    I hike 3-4 times a week and about once a month do a long 8-12 mile hike. I live in MT near Yellowstone so have many options. Otherwise I walk just about every day. These are my go to exercises as I do not to run at all. I figure the push on a steep elevation climb or switchbacks is equivilant to sprinting because it sure gets your heart racing.

    Footwear - summer my Tevas, winter my Vasques (which are still available). You can resole your vasques. Send them back to the company runs about $75.

    Jeanne

    Sent from my SCH-I925 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

  5. #15
    spk's Avatar
    spk
    spk is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdmt View Post
    winter my Vasques (which are still available). You can resole your vasques. Send them back to the company runs about $75.

    Jeanne Sent from my SCH-I925 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
    They discontinued my model of Vasques (mens) and back a few years ago, they wouldn't resole. I'll have to try again, thanks for mentioning this Jeanne.

    “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

    Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

  6. #16
    skotcharu's Avatar
    skotcharu is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdmt View Post
    I hike 3-4 times a week and about once a month do a long 8-12 mile hike. I live in MT near Yellowstone so have many options. Otherwise I walk just about every day. These are my go to exercises as I do not to run at all. I figure the push on a steep elevation climb or switchbacks is equivilant to sprinting because it sure gets your heart racing.

    Footwear - summer my Tevas, winter my Vasques (which are still available). You can resole your vasques. Send them back to the company runs about $75.

    Jeanne

    Sent from my SCH-I925 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
    I love my Vasques, best hiking boots i ever bought. My wife and I hike almost every other week. We hit up Harriman State Park in NY. Soooooo many trails. We also snowshoe when we get the chance.

  7. #17
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    sbhikes is offline Senior Member
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    I hike a lot. But hiking is what ultimately ruined me and set me toward a paleo lifestyle to cure what broke. I hiked too much. Long distance backpacking is what really floats my boat. I hiked 3000+ miles in two summers on a poor diet and ended up here. I also ruined my feet hiking some of those miles in supportive trail running shoes. So hiking also led me to minimalist footwear. I now hike in New Balance Minimus 730 (really cheap, way more minimal than they appear). I also know many other long distance hikers who prefer minimalist hiking shoes (Altra Lone Peaks seem to be quite popular) and several who also adhere to a primal or close-to-primal diet. I just came back from a two-week traverse of Glacier National park. A short hike of 120 miles or so. I think a backpack trip needs to be about 500 miles to feel like I'm really settling into the swing of things. 1000 miles is about long enough. Some day I'll try to do a full 2500 or so and see if I can hack it.



    In all honesty, most hikers end up sort of doughy and flabby the more they hike, especially the long distance hikers. You might find this article interesting. It was part of what helped me figure out why so much hiking ruined me. Not that it's 100% the right reason or cure, but it was a clue that got me here.
    Why Hikers Get Fat
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

  8. #18
    moluv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    I hike a lot. But hiking is what ultimately ruined me and set me toward a paleo lifestyle to cure what broke. I hiked too much. Long distance backpacking is what really floats my boat. I hiked 3000+ miles in two summers on a poor diet and ended up here. I also ruined my feet hiking some of those miles in supportive trail running shoes. So hiking also led me to minimalist footwear. I now hike in New Balance Minimus 730 (really cheap, way more minimal than they appear). I also know many other long distance hikers who prefer minimalist hiking shoes (Altra Lone Peaks seem to be quite popular) and several who also adhere to a primal or close-to-primal diet. I just came back from a two-week traverse of Glacier National park. A short hike of 120 miles or so. I think a backpack trip needs to be about 500 miles to feel like I'm really settling into the swing of things. 1000 miles is about long enough. Some day I'll try to do a full 2500 or so and see if I can hack it.



    In all honesty, most hikers end up sort of doughy and flabby the more they hike, especially the long distance hikers. You might find this article interesting. It was part of what helped me figure out why so much hiking ruined me. Not that it's 100% the right reason or cure, but it was a clue that got me here.
    Why Hikers Get Fat
    My husband wants me to do long backpacking trips like this with him. I've never made it past a treeline by much!

  9. #19
    sbhikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moluv View Post
    My husband wants me to do long backpacking trips like this with him. I've never made it past a treeline by much!
    The nice thing about Glacier (also about the Pacific Northwest in general) is that you can get above treeline around 6000 feet or so. You won't be struggling with altitude at such a low elevation. In California you have to get to about 11,000 feet to get above the trees.

    You ought to give backpacking a try sometime. You might just find out that you like it. To make it more enjoyable, go to Backpacking Light and learn how to lighten the load. Having a heavy pack and boots giving you blisters takes all the fun out of it. You don't have to go to all the extremes people discuss there, but every little bit helps.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

  10. #20
    spk's Avatar
    spk
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Great info and enjoying the article sbhikes. I wondered how your Glacier trek went; looks like your back held up

    LOVE THE FANTASTIC PIC -

    “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

    Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

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