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Thread: Yes, another running question page

  1. #1
    running_mum's Avatar
    running_mum is offline Junior Member
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    Yes, another running question

    Primal Fuel
    Hi Everyone

    A bit of background: I started running last year in September, so I am a beginner runner. Went from struggling to run for 30 seconds to running 8kms (I am training for a 10k race). I know it is not impressive, but for me, this is a huge achievement.

    I started PB 3 weeks ago but I only ran twice in the past three weeks. I have been reading a lot and got a bit confused to what ‘chronic cardio’ means, I run for about 50 minutes at the moment and I still find it takes a lot of willpower to finish my training. BUT in saying that, I feel like it’s something I have to do, because for the first time in my life I am achieving something I thought it was impossible. But the question is, is this classified as chronic cardio?

    And also, eat carbs not eat carbs? Totally confused! I lift weights twice, maybe three times week too. I am not too worried about the exact number. I have been eating low carb generally but I have no idea of how many grams that is, if it is too low or too much?

    Any feedback is much appreciated 

  2. #2
    laurathegoth's Avatar
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    I've only been running 2 years and I generally stick at 5k but have been known to do the odd 10k. I am only recently back following pb but last time I found that carbs from veg were more than enough, especially if eating sweet potatoes regularly. I wouldn't class it as chronic cardio personally at these distances (though I suppose some might disagree), try not to be going too hard though-general rule of thumb is to be able to hold a conversation. Oh and sprint occasionally between lamp-posts is good if you're a road runner (and in the uk possibly)

  3. #3
    Huarache Gal's Avatar
    Huarache Gal is offline Senior Member
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    I run 3x a week myself, a couple of 3 milers and a 5 or 6 miler on the weekend. I just do it because I enjoy it and its good exercise for me and my running buddy (see avatar). I don't consider it chronic cardio, especially at my snail-like pace.

    As far as carbs, I run fasted and stay fairly low carb during the week. I do eat sweet potatoes here and there and fruit from time to time. The carb part is really an experiment of one in my opinion. I don't specifically restrict carbs and do tend to have sweet potatoes at the end of the week, closer to my longer run. For me, I think a little extra in the carb category is good for the longer run. YMMV
    Last edited by Huarache Gal; 08-20-2013 at 01:50 PM.

  4. #4
    Graycat's Avatar
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    I started running year and a half ago and after I got used to it, which took about a month, I was running 30 -35 mi. a week. To tell you the truth, it didn't do much for me weight loss-wise, and I kept my calories in check as well at the time. You say it sometimes takes a lot of willpower to complete your workout, which could mean you could have electrolyte (sodium, potassium and maybe magnesium) imbalance, dehydration, or most likely fatigue due to low-carbing.
    As to chronic-cardio, the way I look at it - if it is no longer fun and your running feels really exerting, than yes you are in chronic-cardio territory.
    Personally, I couldn't run on less than 100g. carbs daily and now usually consume at least twice that number and feel great.

    Several months ago I switched to a more well rounded workout routine where I incorporate HIIT exercises and weights as well as running and I think that has worked better for me in terms of achieving my weight and body comp goals.

  5. #5
    BenP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by running_mum View Post
    Hi Everyone

    A bit of background: I started running last year in September, so I am a beginner runner. Went from struggling to run for 30 seconds to running 8kms (I am training for a 10k race). I know it is not impressive, but for me, this is a huge achievement.

    I started PB 3 weeks ago but I only ran twice in the past three weeks. I have been reading a lot and got a bit confused to what ‘chronic cardio’ means, I run for about 50 minutes at the moment and I still find it takes a lot of willpower to finish my training. BUT in saying that, I feel like it’s something I have to do, because for the first time in my life I am achieving something I thought it was impossible. But the question is, is this classified as chronic cardio?

    And also, eat carbs not eat carbs? Totally confused! I lift weights twice, maybe three times week too. I am not too worried about the exact number. I have been eating low carb generally but I have no idea of how many grams that is, if it is too low or too much?

    Any feedback is much appreciated 
    I'll explain as I understand things:

    If you wear a heart rate monitor while running, you'll see it going up the harder you work out (obvious). The heart rate will fall into different zones (which you can google if of interest). These depend a bit on your age, your fitness and your genetics. But let's work on an example (me), if I exercise at a heart rate of 130-145 (could be called zone 2) this would be classed as low intensity; 150-170 could probably be classed as zone 3; and above 170 zone 4.

    Zone 3 would be classed as chronic cardio and basically the benefits from working at this intensity aren't great and cause stress to your body/heart/system. However many people just train and run without measuring and as a result train in the chronic cardio zone.

    You're far better doing something like this: 80% of your training at low intensity (zone 2) and 20% at high intensity (zone 4). Both develop your fitness and aerobic and anaerobic systems well. You can't just work out at the high intensity level as you'll break yourself.

    Mark Sisson and also Ben Greenfield follow this approach (to slightly different levels).

    Hope that helps.

    Running at low intensity is actually quite hard work as you'll be slow and the temptation is to run faster, but resist and you'll develop your fitness much better!

  6. #6
    BenP's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Forgot to mention the carb thing. I'm a low carb guy and training at a low intensity trains your body to use fat as its energy source, so another benefit.

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