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  1. #11
    picklepete's Avatar
    picklepete is online now Senior Member
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    Primal Fuel
    Skyr, ricotta, and paneer also contain a good whack of protein.
    34//6'3"/180

    Lots of: urban hiking, cycling, sprinting
    Lots of: fresh meat, seafood, eggs, organs, tubers, starch fruits, vegetables, meat fat, dairy fat, oil fruits
    Some: cured meat, dairy protein, sweet fruits, rice, pulses, tree nuts, oil seeds
    Minimal: soy, refined proteins, sugar, liquid carbohydrate, grains, refined oils, peanuts

  2. #12
    Knifegill's Avatar
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    I like raw cream from A2 cows. Good bang for the buck, too! Not for protein, though. Dairy is not for protein, it's for fat.
    Last edited by Knifegill; 08-18-2013 at 10:32 PM.


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  3. #13
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    Don't you live on a tropical island in Asia? For me, getting enough protein from cheese would mean sending my calories way out of whack from fat intake. If you have whole milk products available, try any of those. Cream is a good source of fat calories, but not a good source of protein.

  4. #14
    girlhk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    Amino acid ratios. American cows have higher tryptophan in their milk, but the calcium ratio helps convert excess to vitamin b3 instead of serotonin. Daisy brand cottage cheese has no gums or junk in it, btw, it's what I eat.
    I found Daisy brand cottage cheese for the first time here and got some. But I won't have a regular supply. We live on an island and only a few grocery stores import cheese. Most are cheddar, mozzarella, with tons of other ingredients in it.

  5. #15
    girlhk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by picklepete View Post
    Skyr, ricotta, and paneer also contain a good whack of protein.
    Ricotta cheese I've found here have a long ingredient list...

  6. #16
    girlhk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    Don't you live on a tropical island in Asia? For me, getting enough protein from cheese would mean sending my calories way out of whack from fat intake. If you have whole milk products available, try any of those. Cream is a good source of fat calories, but not a good source of protein.
    I don't need to get all protein from cheese, just some. I eat eggs and offal regularly, but large quantities are not appetizing for me. I'm looking for alternatives to meat. Some days I just don't feel like a lot of meat.

  7. #17
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    Well, i think!
    A dairy is a business enterprise established for the harvesting of animal milk – mostly from cows or goats, but also from buffalo, sheep, horses or camels – for human consumption.

  8. #18
    Allenete's Avatar
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    I meant to say something similar to what eKatherine said. Didn't mean to imply low-carb etc
    Milk - 50% sugar (lactose) and 30% protein. AS AN EXAMPLE. I realise cheeses and yoghurt have different (better) ratios.
    Not to say this wont work for you or is bad, I guess I'm actually trying to feel out some more information myself :P

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allenete View Post
    I meant to say something similar to what eKatherine said. Didn't mean to imply low-carb etc
    Milk - 50% sugar (lactose) and 30% protein. AS AN EXAMPLE. I realise cheeses and yoghurt have different (better) ratios.
    Not to say this wont work for you or is bad, I guess I'm actually trying to feel out some more information myself :P
    Lol, I'm not sure yet it'll work for me either. But it's fun to experiment. Anyway I like cheese and cream so cutting it out would be hard. I was happy to see that dairy can be part of a healthy diet. People used to talk about dairy as their 20%.

  10. #20
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    Aged, unpasteurised hard cheeses like Parmesan, Vintage Gruyere and some of the more artisan, aged, raw cheddars have zero lactose (so no worries if you are lactose intolerant) and also have a very impressive protein count. Whilst raw milk is hard to obtain (depending where you are) unpasteurised cheese shouldn't be and it is much more easily tolerated. Parmesan and Gruyere have appellation systems that require that they are made from raw milk so they are great. They are very calorific so that's something to be aware of but personally I find cheese very satiating so don't worry overly about that. A small piece of cheese takes me a long way. Parmesan is amazing for cooking. And when it's fresh enough ( newly opened into, or correctly stored) just for nibbling. Goes very nicely with that glass of red Mark is always mentioning.

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